Skip to content

Software Development News: .NET, Java, PHP, Ruby, Agile, Databases, SOA, JavaScript, Open Source

Methods & Tools

Subscribe to Methods & Tools
if you are not afraid to read more than one page to be a smarter software developer, software tester or project manager!

Feed aggregator

Intel Unveils Upcoming Xeon Phi Chip for AI Workloads

eWeek - Application Development - Wed, 08/17/2016 - 22:15
"Knights Mill," due next year, is part of the chip maker's effort to expand its capabilities in AI and machine learning.
Categories: Media

Honor Delivers First Flagship Smartphone for the U.S.

eWeek - Application Development - Wed, 08/17/2016 - 21:35
Priced from $400 to $450 and available for preorder, the Honor 8 has dual rear cameras and comes with 32GB or 64GB of on-board storage.
Categories: Media

New Test Shows Nearly a Third of Users Fall for Phishing

eWeek - Application Development - Wed, 08/17/2016 - 21:20
About 400 organizations tested 11,542 employees to see how many would click on phishing emails; nearly a third did, Duo Security's new tool showed.
Categories: Media

Ixia’s ThreatARMOR Delivers Zero-Day Malware Immunity | @CloudExpo @IXIAcom #IoT #Cloud #Security

Latest News from AJAX & RIA Journal - Wed, 08/17/2016 - 21:15
Ixia has announced that the company’s ThreatARMOR™ solution, a key component of Ixia’s Security Fabric™, adds Zero-Day Malware Immunity™ (ZDMI), which blocks mutated versions of malware that use sophisticated obfuscation techniques to evade detection by signature-based security engines. The Ixia Security Fabric provides robust resilience, context-aware intelligent data handling, and security intelligence, ensuring the right data gets to the right tools every time even when encrypted, and enhancing the performance of existing security tools.

read more

Categories: Media, RIA

Hackers Claim Theft of NSA Equation Group Cyber Tools

eWeek - Application Development - Wed, 08/17/2016 - 21:10
DAILY VIDEO: Shadow Brokers allegedly hack NSA's Equation Group; Google begins development of Fuchsia open-source OS; Salesforce Inbox to include Calendar feature for smarter scheduling; and there's more.
Categories: Media

LinkedIn Open-Sources Its Python Plug-In for Gradle

eWeek - Application Development - Wed, 08/17/2016 - 21:00
LinkedIn announced that it has open-sourced its {py}gradle Python plug-in for the Gradle build automation system.
Categories: Media

Cobalt Labs Raises $1.5M for Crowdsourced Security Platform

eWeek - Application Development - Wed, 08/17/2016 - 20:20
Crowdsourced bug bounties are not unusual, but startup Cobalt Labs also is crowdsourcing penetration testing.
Categories: Media

An Introduction to RESTful APIs | @CloudExpo #API #Cloud #RESTful

Latest News from AJAX & RIA Journal - Wed, 08/17/2016 - 20:15
Imagine if every PhD dissertation resulted in something that changed the world? That's what happened when Roy Fielding presented his doctoral dissertation on the "representational state transfer" at University of California-Irvine in 2000. This dissertation laid the groundwork for the staggering growth of RESTful web services, which have reshaped how organizations deploy and utilize APIs. In fact, today 70% of public APIs depend on REST services.

read more

Categories: Media, RIA

From Google Summer of Code to Game of Thrones on the Back of a JavaScript Dragon (Part 2)

Google Open Source Blog - Wed, 08/17/2016 - 20:08
This guest post is a part of a short series about Guy Yachdav, Tatyana Goldberg and Christian Dallago and the journey that was inspired by their participation as Google Summer of Code mentors for the BioJS project. Don’t miss the first post in the series. Heads up, this post contains spoilers for Game of Thrones seasons 5 and 6!

We built on the Google Summer of Code (GSoC) philosophy and the lessons we learned from participating in 2014 by starting a JavaScript Technology class at the Technical University of Munich (TUM).
We began with two dozen students who worked on expanding the BioJS visualization library. Our class became popular quickly and the number of applicants doubled each semester (nearly 180 applicants for 40 seats in the 2016 summer term).
In 2016 our team grew to include Christian Dallago, who had joined as a GSoC mentor. Together we decided to break with tradition of our course’s previous semesters. Instead of focusing on data visualization, we wanted to introduce students to data science with JavaScript. To get our students fully engaged, we decided the project would center on data from the hit TV show, Game of Thrones.
Our aim was to create an online portal for Game of Thrones fans which would:
  1. Provide the most comprehensive, structured and open data set about the Game of Thrones world accessible via API.
  2. Present an interactive map based on JavaScript.
  3. Listen to what people are saying on Twitter about each of the show’s characters.
  4. Use machine learning algorithms to predict the likelihood of each character’s death.
Our plan worked — the students were engaged. It was a beautiful sight to see: GitHub repos humming with activity as each dev team delved deeper into their projects. As a project manager, you know you’ve got something good when issues are being opened and closed at 4:00 AM!
The results were mind blowing. In 50 days of programming, 36 students opened over 1,200 issues and pull requests, pushed 3,300 commits, released four apps to NPM, and, of course, produced one absolutely amazing website.
The website amasses data from 2,028 characters. Our map shows 240 landmarks and the paths traveled by 28 characters. Our Twitter sentiment analysis tool analyzed over 3 million tweets. And we launched the first ever machine learning-based prediction algorithm that predicts the likelihood of dying for the 1,451 characters in the show that are still alive.
image02fix.pngVisualization of Twitter sentiment analysis data for Jon Snow during season 5 of Game of Thrones. The X axis shows the timeline and the Y axis shows the number of positive (green) and negative (red) tweets. Each tweet is analyzed by an algorithm using a neural network to determine whether the tweet’s writer has a positive, negative or neutral attitude toward the character. Since launch, the site’s popularity has skyrocketed. Following our press release, we were covered by over 1,500 media outlets, most notably Time, The GuardianRolling Stone, Daily Mail, BBC, Reuters, The Telegraph, CNET and many more. HowStuffWorks, The Vulture and others produced videos about the site and Chris Hardwick’s Comedy Central show did a segment about us. We've also given countless interviews to TV, radio and newspapers.
Blog2_Figure1_v3.pngGoogle Analytics for the website. Left chart shows the number of visitors to the website during the first week after launch, reaching over 73K visitors on April 25th. Right chart shows the number of visitors at a given time point during the same week.The most exciting part of the project was predicting the likelihood that any given character would die using machine learning. Machine learning algorithms find rules and patterns in the data, things that humans cannot obviously and simply detect. Once the rules and patterns are identified, we apply machine learning to make inferences or predictions from novel, previously unseen, data sets.
Warning: The next paragraphs contain spoilers for seasons 5 and 6 of Game of Thrones!
In order to predict the likelihood of a character’s death, we collected information about all of the characters that appeared in books 1 to 5 and analyzed over 30 features, including age, gender, marital status and others. Then we used a support vector machine (SVM) to statistically compare the features of characters, both dead and alive, to predict who would get the axe next. Our prediction was correct for 74% of all cases and surprised us by placing a number of characters thought to be relatively safe in grave danger.
According to our predictions, Jon Snow, who was seemingly betrayed and murdered by fellow members of the Night’s Watch at the end of season 5, had only an 11% chance of dying. Indeed, Jon has risen from the dead in the second episode of season 6! We also predicted that the rulers of Dorn (Doran and Trystane) Martell are at a high likelihood of death and, as predicted, they were taken out in the first episode of the new season.
Of course, as is always the case with predictions, there were also misses. We didn’t expect Roose Bolton to be killed off nor did we see Hodor’s departure coming.
This experience was an amazing ride for our team and it all started with Google Summer of Code! In the next post we’ll share what followed and where we see ourselves heading in the future.
By Guy Yachdav, Tatyana Goldberg and Christian Dallago, BioJS
Categories: Open Source

From Google Summer of Code to Game of Thrones on the Back of a JavaScript Dragon (Part 1)

Google Open Source Blog - Wed, 08/17/2016 - 20:08
This guest post is a part of a short series about Tatyana Goldberg and Guy Yachdav, instructors at Technical University of Munich, and the journey that was inspired by their participation as Google Summer of Code mentors for the BioJS project.

Hello there! We are from the BioJavaScript (BioJS) project which first joined Google Summer of Code (GSoC) in 2014. Our experience in the program set us on a grand open source adventure that we’ll be sharing with you in a series of blog posts. We hope you enjoy our story and, more importantly, hope it inspires you to pursue your own open source adventure.
Tatyana Goldberg and Guy Yachdav, GSoC mentors and open source enthusiasts. Photo taken at the MorpheusCup competition Luxembourg, May 2016.We came together around the BioJS community, an open source project for creating beautiful and interactive open source visualizations of biological data on the web. BioJS visualizations are made up of components which have a modular design. This modular design enables several things: they can be used by non-programmers, they can be combined to make more complex visualizations, and they can be easily integrated into existing web applications. Despite being a young community, BioJS already has traction in industry and academia.
In early 2014 we decided to apply for GSoC and we were fortunate to have our application accepted on our first try. The experience was extremely positive — the five students we accepted delivered great software and they had a big impact on the BioJS community:
  • The number of mailing list subscribers doubled in less than a month.
  • All five of our accepted students from 2014 became core developers.
  • Students were invited to six international conferences to share their work.
  • Students helped organize the first BioJS conference held July 2015.
  • Most importantly, the students have independently designed BioJS version 2.0 which positioned BioJS as the leading open source visualization library for biological data. 
You can see three examples of the work GSoC students did on BioJS below:

MSAViewer is a visualization and analysis of multiple sequence alignments and was developed by Sebastian Wilzbach. Proteome Viewer is a multilevel visualization of proteomes in the UniProt database and was developed by Jose Villaveces. Genetic Variation Viewer is visualization of the number and type of mutations at each position in a biological sequence and was developed by Saket Choudhary.
We learned a lot in the first year we participated in Google Summer of Code. Here are some of the takeaways that are especially relevant to mentors and organizations that are considering joining the program:
  1. GSoC is a great source of dedicated and enthusiastic young developers.
  2. Mentors need to carefully manage students, listen to them and let them lead initiatives when it makes sense.
  3. Org admins should leverage success in GSoC beyond the program.
  4. Orgs need to find the most motivated students and make sure their projects are feasible.
  5. People want to share in your success, so participation in GSoC can start a positive feedback loop attracting new contributors and users.
  6. Most importantly: the ideas behind GSoC - the love for open source and coding - are contagious and spread easily to larger audiences, especially to students and other people who work in academia. Just try it! 
Our positive experience spurred us to seek out and conquer new challenges. Stay tuned for our next post where we explain how GSoC inspired us to create a popular new class and how we applied data science to Game of Thrones.
By Tatyana Goldberg and Guy Yachdav, BioJS and TU Munich
Categories: Open Source

Gold-Medal Tech, Your Cloud Shopping List | @CloudExpo #IaaS #Cloud #DataCenter

Latest News from AJAX & RIA Journal - Wed, 08/17/2016 - 19:15
I just had to write an Olympic-themed headline, since today is the first day of the 2016 Summer Games! I love the Olympics. It's so much fun watching athletes do what they're best at. Plus, they have the extra challenge this year of swimming or boating in polluted, mucky water-so it's even more impressive for the winners, I suppose. Technology is charging forward in sports, like everywhere else. New at this year's Olympic Games are underwater lap counters for swimmers and an infrastructure powered by cloud computing, with a full disaster recovery center ready off-site. Keep an eye on network traffic these next few weeks when employees are streaming Olympic events during lunch.

read more

Categories: Media, RIA

Apple Promises R&D Facility in China This Year

eWeek - Application Development - Wed, 08/17/2016 - 18:45
Tim Cook, during his ninth visit to China, confirmed that Apple will open an R&D facility there this year. He said China still holds potential for Apple.
Categories: Media

Kyocera DuraForce Pro Phone Features Wide-View HD Action Camera

eWeek - Application Development - Wed, 08/17/2016 - 18:42
Kyocera's DuraForce Pro is a ruggedized smartphone designed to withstand tough conditions and offer wide images. Here's a look at its key features.
Categories: Media

A Google Santa Tracker update from Santa's Elves

Google Open Source Blog - Wed, 08/17/2016 - 18:00

Originally posted on the Google Developers Blog

By Sam Thorogood, Developer Programs Engineer


Today, we're announcing that the open source version of Google's Santa Tracker has been updated with the Android and web experiences that ran in December 2015. We extended, enhanced and upgraded our code, and you can see how we used our developer products - including Firebase and Polymer - to build a fun, educational and engaging experience.


To get started, you can check out the code on GitHub at google/santa-tracker-weband google/santa-tracker-android. Both repositories include instructions so you can build your own version.
Santa Tracker isn’t just about watching Santa’s progress as he delivers presents on December 24. Visitors can also have fun with the winter-inspired experiences, games and educational content by exploring Santa's Village while Santa prepares for his big journey throughout the holidays.
Below is a summary of what we’ve released as open source.
Android app
  • The Santa Tracker Android app is a single APK, supporting all devices, such as phones, tablets and TVs, running Ice Cream Sandwich (4.0) and up. The source code for the app can be found here.
  • Santa Tracker leverages Firebase features, including Remote Config API, App Invites to invite your friends to play along, and Firebase Analytics to help our elves better understand users of the app.
  • Santa’s Village is a launcher for videos, games and the tracker that responds well to multiple devices such as phones and tablets. There's even an alternative launcher based on the Leanback user interface for Android TVs.


  • Games on Santa Tracker Android are built using many technologies such as JBox2D (gumball game), Android view hierarchy (memory match game) and OpenGL with special rendering engine (jetpack game). We've also included a holiday-themed variation of Pie Noon, a fun game that works on Android TV, your phone, and inside Google Cardboard's VR.
Android Wear

  • The custom watch faces on Android Wear provide a personalized touch. Having Santa or one of his friendly elves tell the time brings a smile to all. Building custom watch faces is a lot of fun but providing a performant, battery friendly watch face requires certain considerations. The watch face source code can be found here.
  • Santa Tracker uses notifications to let users know when Santa has started his journey. The notifications are further enhanced to provide a great experience on wearables using custom backgrounds and actions that deep link into the app.
On the web

  • Santa Tracker is mobile-first: this year's experience was built for the mobile web, including an amazing brand new, interactive - yet fully responsive, village: with three breakpoints, touch gesture support and support for the Web App Manifest.
  • To help us develop Santa at scale, we've upgraded to Polymer 1.0+. Santa Tracker's use of Polymer demonstrates how easy it is to package code into reusable components. Every housein Santa's Village is a custom element, only loaded when needed, minimizing the startup cost of Santa Tracker.


  • Many of the amazing new games (like Present Bounce) were built with the latest JavaScript standards (ES6) and are compiled to support older browsers via the Google Closure Compiler.
  • Santa Tracker's interactive and fun experience is enhanced using the Web Animations API, a standardized JavaScript APIfor unifying animated content.
  • We simplified the Chromecast support this year, focusing on a great screensaver that would countdown to the big event on December 24th - and occasionally autoplay some of the great video content from around Santa's Village.
We hope that this update inspires you to make your own magical experiences based on all the interesting and exciting components that came together to make Santa Tracker!
Categories: Open Source

Key Features That Give Lenovo Y710, Y910 Desktops High-End Performance

eWeek - Application Development - Wed, 08/17/2016 - 17:33
Lenovo's Y710 Cube and Y910 desktops deliver high-end performance and compelling features that might help distinguish them in a saturated PC market.
Categories: Media

Intel CEO: PCs Powered by 'Kaby Lake' Chips Coming This Year

eWeek - Application Development - Wed, 08/17/2016 - 16:45
CEO Brian Krzanich at IDF showed off the new graphics capabilities in the company's 7th-Generation 14nm Core processors for PCs.
Categories: Media

Google Cloud Databases Now Generally Available

Devx: Latest Published Articles - Wed, 08/17/2016 - 16:20
Cloud SQL Second Generation, Cloud Datastore and Cloud Bigtable are ready for enterprise use.
Categories: Media

Eclipse Newsletter - Eclipse Che: A New Eclipse IDE

Eclipse News - Wed, 08/17/2016 - 16:07
Read this month's newsletter to learn all about Eclipse Che!
Categories: Open Source

Keys to Facilitation Success | @BigDataExpo #IoT #BigData #Analytics

Latest News from AJAX & RIA Journal - Wed, 08/17/2016 - 14:45
This is an unusual blog for me. Usually I talk about how organizations can more effectively leverage data and analytics to power their business. However, as I conduct more Big Data Vision Workshops, I have come to realize that a big part of the success of these engagements is the ability to “listen and comprehend.” Here are some observations and tips for “listening and comprehending” more effectively. I’ve classified this as “facilitation” because I seek to “facilitate” a dialogue with the client where I can learn enough about the client’s business to help them build the right Big Data business strategy.

read more

Categories: Media, RIA

Why Apps Should Be Built Like Planes | @DevOpsSummit #APM #DevOps #DigitalTransformation

Latest News from AJAX & RIA Journal - Wed, 08/17/2016 - 14:30
I’ve been flying quite a bit lately and I started thinking about why apps should be built more like planes. This is not meant to be a deep and insightful blog but rather amusing so I hope you enjoy my perspective!

read more

Categories: Media, RIA