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Community Choice Project of the Month Vote for May 2014

Wed, 04/23/2014 - 20:28

The vote for May 2014 Community Choice SourceForge Project of the Month is now available, and will run until 2014-05-07 00:00 UTC:

Vote here for the Community Choice SourceForge Project of the Month for May 2014

The candidates (in random order) are as follows:

SleepyHead

Open-source, cross platform, sleep tracking software with a focus on monitoring CPAP treatment.

[ Download SleepyHead ]

FTLEditor

A 3rd-party tool to edit user files for the game FasterThanLight. With this, you can unlock any or all ships and achievements in your user profile, or tweak most aspects of saved games: crew, systems, weapons, fires, breaches, etc.

[ Download FTLEditor ]

The FreeType Project

The FreeType project develops free, portable and high-quality software solutions for digital typography. We focus on bringing small, efficient and ubiquitous products.

[ Download The FreeType Project ]

D-Fend Reloaded

D-Fend Reloaded is a graphical environment for DOSBox. D-Fend Reloaded is a successor of the discontinued D-Fend. Both environments look alike and D-Fend Reloaded contains all features of D-Fend. Even the D-Fend config files can be used.

[ Download D-Fend Reloaded ]

ApexDC++

ApexDC™ is an innovative DC++ client based on StrongDC++. It features external plugins and scripting through LUA and much more. Both operators and users alike should find ApexDC++ a pleasant experience.

[ Download ApexDC++ ]

NAS4Free

NAS4Free is an embedded Open Source Storage distribution and supports sharing across Windows, Apple, and UNIX-like systems. It includes ZFS, Software RAID (0,1,5), disk encryption, S.M.A.R.T / email reports etc. with following protocols: CIFS (samba), FTP, NFS, TFTP, AFP, RSYNC, Unison, iSCSI, UPnP, Bittorent (initiator and target), Bridge, CARP (Common Address Redundancy Protocol) and HAST (Highly Available Storage). All this can easy be setup by it’s highly configurable WEB interface. NAS4Free can be installed on Compact Flash/USB/SSD media, Hard disk or booted of from a LiveCD with a usb stick.

[ Download NAS4Free ]

JSToolNpp

A javascript plugin for Notepad++. Douglas Crockford’s JSMin algorithm to minimize javascript code. My own algorithm to format javascript code. A JSON data viewer. Really helpful to javascript coder on Notepad++ and really easy to use it.

[ Download JSToolNpp ]

PostInstallerF

PostInstallerF will install all the software that Fedora doesn’t include by default, after running Fedora for the first time. Its easy for a new user. PostInstallerF contains everything that you need for your daily computing.

[ Download PostInstallerF ]

devkitPro

This project is for homebrew console development tools based on the gnu compiler collection with additional tools and libraries to aid programming each supported console. The windows variants are built with MinGW.

[ Download devkitPro ]

Categories: Open Source

Projects of the Week, April 21, 2014

Mon, 04/21/2014 - 21:17

Here’s the projects that we’re featuring this week on the front page of SourceForge.net:

AkelPad

A simple notepad-like text editor with many features. It is designed to be a small and fast.

[ Download AkelPad ]

packfilemanager

This is the Total War pack file manager project, starting from version 1.7. A short introduction into Warscape modding: http://www.twcenter.net/forums/showthread.php?620537-Warscape-Modding-Primer Join the PFM user group on Steam to receive update notifications: http://steamcommunity.com/groups/pfm_users

[ Download packfilemanager ]

^C
metalmark sfcomtools-code $ perl project_description -r -f ~/sourceforge/featured/featured_2014-04-21
Emgu CV

Emgu CV is a cross platform .Net wrapper to the OpenCV image processing library. Allowing OpenCV functions to be called from .NET compatible languages such as C#, VB, VC++, IronPython etc. The wrapper can be compiled in Mono and run on Windows, Linux, Mac OS X, iPhone, iPad and Android devices.

[ Download Emgu CV ]

NAS4Free

NAS4Free is an embedded Open Source Storage distribution and supports sharing across Windows, Apple, and UNIX-like systems. It includes ZFS, Software RAID (0,1,5), disk encryption, S.M.A.R.T / email reports etc. with following protocols: CIFS (samba), FTP, NFS, TFTP, AFP, RSYNC, Unison, iSCSI, UPnP, Bittorent (initiator and target), Bridge, CARP (Common Address Redundancy Protocol) and HAST (Highly Available Storage). All this can easy be setup by it’s highly configurable WEB interface. NAS4Free can be installed on Compact Flash/USB/SSD media, Hard disk or booted of from a LiveCD with a usb stick.

[ Download NAS4Free ]

phpList

phpList is the world’s most popular Open Source email campaign manager. With a powerful set of features, personalisation, segmentation, open and click metrics, throttling and an API. Download and install on your own server or get a free trial of the hosted version @ http://phplist.com/hosted Available in more than 20 translations, provided by the phpList community.

[ Download phpList ]

AkelPad

A simple notepad-like text editor with many features. It is designed to be a small and fast.

[ Download AkelPad ]

Diskless Remote Boot in Linux (DRBL)

DRBL provides diskless or systemless environment. It uses distributed hardware resources and makes it possible for clients to fully access local hardware. It also includes Clonezilla, a partition and disk cloning utility similar to Ghost.

[ Download Diskless Remote Boot in Linux (DRBL) ]

CoCEd

CoCed allows you to edit your saves from the game “Corruption of Champions”. You can edit your stats, items, perks, appearance and body. INSTALLATION: 1) Download and extract the files anywhere you want. No installation required. 2) WindowsXP users must install the Microsoft dotnet framework 4.0: http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=17113 COMPATIBILITY * Requires at least Windows XP (which means it also work with Vista, Seven and W8 of course). * Not compatible with OSX and Linux, even with Wine and Mono. Sorry. HAVE A QUESTION? FOUND A BUG? WANT TO CONTRIBUTE? http://forum.fenoxo.com/thread-6324.html CONTRIBUTORS Perdev (creator) Bobbaganoosh TheMadExile

[ Download CoCEd ]

Wings 3D

Wings 3D is an advanced subdivision modeler that is both powerful and easy to use (inspired by Nendo and Mirai from Izware).

[ Download Wings 3D ]

packfilemanager

This is the Total War pack file manager project, starting from version 1.7. A short introduction into Warscape modding: http://www.twcenter.net/forums/showthread.php?620537-Warscape-Modding-Primer Join the PFM user group on Steam to receive update notifications: http://steamcommunity.com/groups/pfm_users

[ Download packfilemanager ]

MP4Joiner

MP4Joiner allows joining of multiple MP4 files into a single one without reencoding and without quality loss.

[ Download MP4Joiner ]

Categories: Open Source

Apache OpenOffice hits the 100 Million Downloads Mark!

Thu, 04/17/2014 - 11:39

Apache OpenOffice 100 Million Mark logoThe Apache Software Foundation just announced 100 Million Downloads of Apache™ OpenOffice™.

We are thrilled to be part of this wonderful community, and glad to quote the statement of continued support by our General Manager, Gaurav Kuchhal.

By continuously improving Apache OpenOffice Extensions and Templates sites we show how committed we are about providing projects with what they need most,” said Gaurav Kuchhal, General Manager for Slashdot and SourceForge. “We are happy to help open source projects to grow, no matter where they are hosted or developed. We have been serving over 122 Million downloads for the Apache OpenOffice project, with daily peaks of about 250,000 and we are committed to providing products and services that demonstrate our dedication to technical excellence.

Read the full press-release at the Apache blog.

Categories: Open Source

Apache OpenOffice Extensions Site Gets Social!

Tue, 04/15/2014 - 16:00

Apache OpenOffice Extensions logo

We’re excited to announce that we just released a new Apache OpenOffice Extensions website. This is the fourth time we improve Apache OpenOffice distribution platforms since we started hosting Apache OpenOffice Extensions and Templates sites back in March 2012 (official timeline). Read below to know more about what’s new.

1) Login with your Facebook or Google account.

Finally Apache OpenOffice Extensions website got social, and allows people to login using their Facebook or Google accounts. This would avoid end-users the annoyance of registering and make possible for them to upload a new extension or template from the very first moment. Check it out at http://extensions.openoffice.org/user

The feature has been already tested over the last few weeks and we observed that about 30% of new users are coming this way.

2) OpenOffice 4 Compatibility Information

You can now see at a glance if an extension is OpenOffice 4 compatible (e.g. English dictionaries for Apache OpenOffice). For extensions that do not provide compatibility data we welcome end-users feedback, by casting a vote to “User feedback: Compatible with OpenOffice 4.x?” you can help us to update the compatibility information for extensions that do not have it yet.

3) OS Automatic Detection

Since some extensions have different versions for the different operating systems – e.g. MySQL Driver for Apache OpenOffice – the “Download now” button automatically provides the right version, with a link to “All releases” to download versions for other platforms.

4) Co-maintainers

Now Extensions authors can enable “co-maintainers” to manage their extensions. Co-maintainers are allowed to create new releases and to modify extensions’ descriptions.

Categories: Open Source

April 2014 Project of the Month, Free Pascal

Tue, 04/15/2014 - 10:00

For our April Community Choice Project of the Month, our community has selected Free Pascal, an advanced open source compiler for Pascal and Object Pascal. The project founder, Florian Klaempfl, tells us about the project’s history, purpose, and direction.

SourceForge: Tell us about the Free Pascal project please…
Florian Klaempfl: Free Pascal is an OSS pascal compiler supporting different pascal dialects including modern Object Pascal (for more details see theFree Pascal Homepage). It is written itself in Object Pascal, so users do not have to learn another language if they want to improve their compiler.

SF: What made you start this?
FK: In the early nineties, I wrote chess programs using Turbo Pascal. TP was a 16 bit compiler so it didn’t take advantage of the i386 getting popular at this time. After trying some alternatives, none of them made me happy, I decided to write my own compiler. This was in 1992. The current code base
of FPC was started in 1993. Sounds like Linux at the beginning of Linux, right :) ?

SF: Has the original vision been achieved?
FK: In the sense having a 32 bit compiler pascal compiler yes, in the sense to use it for my chess programs, no. I never ported my chess programs to FPC.

SF: Who can benefit the most from your project?
FK: I think there are multiple groups who can benefit from it:

- People who want to learn only one programming language which allows them to use it for almost everything: FPC can be used to do big database applications but it can be also used to program embedded devices. It can used to write numerical applications but also to code for mobile devices.
- People who have a large Pascal/Object Pascal code base
- People who are interested in a programming language which offers a compromise between high
productivity and the advantages of native code.

Obviously, the most can benefit people who are part of all three groups.

SF: What is the need for this particular programming language?
FK: Modern Object Pascal supports most language features which are expected from an OOP language. In combination with its good readability it is a very powerful language.

Further, the concept of modern pascal allows very fast turn around times. While some people might say this does not matter with today’s machines, I still think it makes a difference: FPC rebuilds its own compiler sources (i386: ~330k lines) on an i7-4770 in 4.2 s. So no need for a cup of coffee while compiling a project.

SF: What’s the best way to get the most out of using Free Pascal?
FK: Using it in combination with Lazarus: a RAD built on top of FPC.

SF: What has your project team done to help build and nurture your community?
FK: I think the most important thing which helps to build and nurture the community is stability in
different aspects:
- we try to break never people’s code, so backward compatibility is an important thing
- we do heavy automated regression testing to avoid bugs being reintroduced, every night, regression tests are run with >100 different configurations and the results are collected in a central database. Developers get a daily summary of the
tests with information if regressions appeared.

Further, FPC tries to give everybody being interested in an working on an OSS pascal compiler a “home”. So the development directions are mainly driven by the contributors as long as two basic rules are obeyed: FPC is a pascal* compiler and other people’s code may not be broken**. Recent example: revived m68k support. It makes little sense to do so to get a lot of new users of FPC, but if somebody implements it, he is free to do so.

*This is subject to be discussed, “wirthian language” compiler might be also ok.
**Of course, sometimes this cannot be avoided.

SF: Have you all found that more frequent releases helps build up your community of users?
FK: FPC has a very slow release cycle: during the last years it is approx. one release per year. There are multiple reasons for this:
- FPC is almost 21 years old, so it has a certain maturity
- Building FPC from development head is not hard and normally done, see above, within a few minutes
- Due to its maturity and a development model grown over years, the development head is normally also very stable.
- We normally prepare binary releases and these binary are not just compiled, packed and uploaded but also tested. Due to the amount of platforms this takes considerable time so each release cycle eats also time which could be spent in other things.

SF: What was the first big thing that happened for your project?
FK: For me it was when the compiler was able to build its own sources, this was in 1995 after almost two years of work.

SF: What is the next big thing for Free Pascal (and/or feel free to talk more in depth about the “write once, compile anywhere” concept, sounds interesting)?
FK:The next big thing for FPC will be the 3.0 release: Besides a lot of new language features, bug fixes and improvements, 3.0 will extend the compile anywhere concept further. It is expected to be the first FPC release version which can output jvm code as well as i8086 code and maybe also the avr port will be in a usable shape.

SF: How long do you think that will take?
FK: We expect to release 3.0 in 2015.

SF: Do you have the resources you need to make that happen?
FK: Normally yes, the only question is what will be in 3.0.

SF: If you had it to do over again, what would you do differently for Free Pascal?
FK: Actually not much.

SF: Is there anything else we should know?
FK: I think the most interesting aspect is that FPC has no company in the background: it is developed by a community of people having either a need for it or having just fun working on it as their hobby.

Categories: Open Source

Feature Enhancement: Including Repository Content into Wiki

Mon, 04/14/2014 - 21:07

We’ve just rolled out a new feature which enhances the [[include]] wiki macro in Apache Allura (which powers SourceForge projects). Before this addition, the macro has typically used to include the contents of a different wiki page into the current page. This has now been expanded to to allow a file in a (SVN, Git, or Mercurial) repository to be the import source. We expect this will particularly useful for projects that like to keep their documentation in their repository, but also want it to be easily accessible from the web in a wiki.

Here’s an example of how this might work:

Let’s say I want to include this example document written in Markdown into a wiki page.

I go to the edit mode for the wiki page, and enter this macro:

[[include repo=git path=example-documentation.md]]

include_demo

Note: for the “repo”, you need to specify the name (ie., mount point) of the repository, not the type. In my example, the name of the repository is “git”.

And that’s it! You can now see the contents on the wiki page: https://sourceforge.net/p/uberproject/wiki/include_demo/

Of course, this feature works with SVN, Git, and Mercurial repositories on the SourceForge site. Another benefit of this feature, is that the import module supports a variety of formatting languages, so you’re no longer limited to just Markdown.

The format is detected by the file extension, we support the following:

Markdown: .md, .mkd, .mkdn, .mdown, .markdown
Textile: .textile
Creole: .creole
ReST: .rst, .rest, .rst.txt, .rest.txt

Source code file extensions (eg., .c and .py) will be syntax highlighted, but will otherwise be unformatted. All other file extensions will be rendered as plain-text. Binary files, of course, can’t be displayed.

Categories: Open Source

Projects of the Week, April 14, 2014

Mon, 04/14/2014 - 15:02

Here’s the projects that we’re featuring this week on the front page of SourceForge.net:

Dungeon Crawl Reference

Dungeon Crawl Stone Soup is a free rogue-like game of exploration and treasure-hunting. Stone Soup is a continuation of Linley’s Dungeon Crawl. It is openly developed and invites participation from the Crawl community. See http://crawl.develz.org !

[ Download Dungeon Crawl Reference ]

Eric Integrated Development Environment

Eric is a Python IDE written using PyQt and QScintilla. It provides various features such as any number of open editors, an integrated (remote) debugger, project management facilities, unit test, refactoring and much more.

[ Download Eric Integrated Development Environment ]

rasplex

This is a community driven port of Plex Home Theater for the raspberry pi. The port is lead by Dale Hamel, with help from various members of the plex community. Plex has also been helpful in the creation of rasplex, and has supported the effort.

[ Download rasplex ]

Kiwix

Kiwix is an offline reader for Web content. It’s especially intended to make Wikipedia available offline. With Kiwix, you can enjoy Wikipedia on a boat, in the middle of nowhere… or in Jail. Kiwix manages to do that by reading ZIM files, a highly compressed open format with additional meta-data.

[ Download Kiwix ]

multibootusb

Multi Boot USB / MultiBoot USB / MultiBootUSB is a software / installer which allows user to install multiple Live Linux Distros in to a single USB drive / Pendrive / Flash drive and able to boot from it. USB can be tested without reboot using inbuilt QEMU.

[ Download multibootusb ]

Wake On Lan

Wake On LAN, WakeOnLAN, shutdown software for Windows. A powerful WOL, ping, shutdown, GUI application.

[ Download Wake On Lan ]

ApexDC++

ApexDC™ is an innovative DC++ client based on StrongDC++. It features external plugins and scripting through LUA and much more. Both operators and users alike should find ApexDC++ a pleasant experience.

[ Download ApexDC++ ]

FTLEditor

A 3rd-party tool to edit user files for the game FasterThanLight. With this, you can unlock any or all ships and achievements in your user profile, or tweak most aspects of saved games: crew, systems, weapons, fires, breaches, etc.

[ Download FTLEditor ]

SleepyHead

Open-source, cross platform, sleep tracking software with a focus on monitoring CPAP treatment.

[ Download SleepyHead ]

Categories: Open Source

SourceForge response to Heartbleed

Thu, 04/10/2014 - 15:35

Hello,

A vulnerability is something susceptible to attack (regardless of whether attack actually occurs using that weakness), and a compromise is something that has been successfully attacked.

Sites and services across the internet have been impacted by a recent vulnerability in OpenSSL, CVE-2014-0160, known as “Heartbleed”. More information on this vulnerability may be found at http://heartbleed.com

Upon disclosure of this vulnerability, SourceForge’s operations team expeditiously reviewed all of our services and confirmed that the only vulnerable service was SourceForge’s Subversion over HTTPS on Allura (svn.code.sourceforge.net).

We are aware of no compromise of our systems. On Tuesday, vulnerable systems were updated to new versions of OpenSSL, and the related SSL certificates were revoked and re-issued with new private keys.

A mailing will be sent to those users who accessed the vulnerable service (svn.code.sourceforge.net) during the window of vulnerability. While we are aware of no compromise of data resulting from this vulnerability, to further reduce risk we are asking certain users to change their SourceForge password.

To change your SourceForge password:

  1. Go to https://sourceforge.net/account/
  2. Login with your username and current password
  3. Click the “Change Password” link on the resulting page
  4. Enter your current and new password in to the form and submit

Passwords may also be reset using the account recovery facility at https://sourceforge.net/account/registration/recover.php

If you do not already make use of a secure password manager, such as KeePass, Password Safe, Mac OS X Keyring, LastPass, etc. you may wish to begin using such a tool, which makes it easy to manage unique and long passwords for every site you access.

Questions and concerns may be directed to the SourceForge.net support team at sfnet_ops@slashdotmedia.com

Thank you,

SourceForge.net Support

Categories: Open Source

Projects of the Week, April 7, 2014

Mon, 04/07/2014 - 20:55

Here’s the projects that we’re featuring this week on the front page of SourceForge.net:

devkitPro

This project is for homebrew console development tools based on the gnu compiler collection with additional tools and libraries to aid programming each supported console. The windows variants are built with MinGW.

[ Download devkitPro ]

calibre

calibre – Ebook management

[ Download calibre ]

digiCamControl

digiCamControl is an free and open source (GPL) software. This allows you to save time by transferring images directly from your camera to your computer as you take each shot and allow to control camera shooting parameters.

[ Download digiCamControl ]

D-Fend Reloaded

D-Fend Reloaded is a graphical environment for DOSBox. D-Fend Reloaded is a successor of the discontinued D-Fend. Both environments look alike and D-Fend Reloaded contains all features of D-Fend. Even the D-Fend config files can be used.

[ Download D-Fend Reloaded ]

Grisbi

Grisbi is a very functional personal financial management program with a reasonable set of homefinance features.

[ Download Grisbi ]

Areca Backup

Areca-Backup is a file backup software that supports incremental, image and delta backup on local drives or FTP servers. Areca-Backup also allows you to browse your backups and navigate among different version of the files contained in your archives.

[ Download Areca Backup ]

Uniform Server

The Uniform Server is a lightweight server solution for running a web server under the WindowsOS. Less than 24MB! Modular design, includes the latest versions of Apache2, Perl5, PHP (switch between PHP53, PHP54, PHP55 or PHP56), MySQL5 or MariaDB5, phpMyAdmin or Adminer4. Run from either hard drive or USB memory stick… NO INSTALLATION REQUIRED! NO REGISTRY DUST! Just UNPACK and FIRE UP!

[ Download Uniform Server ]

Maxima — GPL CAS based on DOE-MACSYMA

Maxima is a fairly complete computer algebra system written in Common Lisp with an emphasis on symbolic computation. It is based on DOE-MACSYMA and licensed under the GPL. Its abilities include symbolic integration, 3D plotting, and an ODE solver.

[ Download Maxima -- GPL CAS based on DOE-MACSYMA ]

FOG – A Free Cloning Solution

FOG is a free open-source cloning/imaging solution/rescue suite. A alt. solution used to image Windows XP, Vista PCs using PXE, PartImage, and a Web GUI to tie it together. Includes featues like memory and disk test, disk wipe, av scan & task scheduling.

[ Download FOG - A Free Cloning Solution ]

Categories: Open Source

Apache Allura Becomes Top-Level Project!

Tue, 04/01/2014 - 12:53

feather-smallThe Apache Software Foundation just announced Apache™ Allura™ as a Top-Level Project.

We are excited to see Allura finally put in the Olympus of Apache Top-Level projects. It has been an amazing journey, we launched the Allura project four years ago and just two years ago Allura was incubated at the ASF.

It has been an honor and a great pleasure to work with the Apache community, and we look forward to engage more and more with all developers interested in using and enhancing Apache Allura! Below a collection of quotes from people who have been participating, sponsoring and supporting the graduation process.

“The journey through the Apache Incubator made Allura a project for the community by the community,” said Dave Brondsema, Vice President of Apache Allura. “I can’t wait to see other Apache projects start using Allura, and hope to catch up with other Apache projects at the upcoming ApacheCon 2014 in Denver!”

“SourceForge has demonstrated their dedication to Open Source by putting their crown jewels into the custodianship of the Apache Software Foundation, and I’m excited to see where the project goes next as it embraces a larger community of users and developers,” said Rich Bowen, Executive Vice President, Apache Software Foundation.

“BerliOS recommends the SourceForge platform for migrating projects currently hosted on BerliOS. We value the fact that the SourceForge platform was first accepted as an Apache Incubator project and we are glad to see it now graduated,” said Lutz Henckel, berliOS project leader. “This achievement means SourceForge platform –now known as Apache Allura– is backed by a diverse and well-structured community. For projects hosted on SourceForge it also reduces the risk of vendor lock-in, as developing projects can get their data and software directly from the platform.”

“Apache Allura is an Open Source modular forge platform using a scalable architecture and with well-known technologies around Python,” says Alvaro del Castillo, Apache Allura committer and CTO of Bitergia. “It is easy to install and configure, a good bet for the future of collaborative software development around forges.”

“We entered the Allura community to suggest the introduction of new functionalities to improve awareness of people and projects. We found that the community was open to our ideas,” said Elisabetta Di Nitto, Associate professor of the University of Milan. “As a researcher I think this was a very interesting experience. We are glad we could influence the development of the forge and that the Allura community found our suggestions useful.”

“SourceForge is very happy that Apache Allura, already used by 431,000 projects, will now be extended and available to an even wider developer community,” said Gaurav Kuchhal, General Manager of SourceForge and Slashdot. “We stay committed to promoting open source projects by providing free marketing and global distribution, no matter where projects are developed.”

Read the full press-release at the Apache blog. See you there!

Categories: Open Source

Projects of the Week, March 31, 2014

Mon, 03/31/2014 - 21:46

Here’s the projects that we’re featuring this week on the front page of SourceForge.net:

antiX-Linux

antiX is a fast, lightweight and easy to install linux live CD distribution based on Debian Testing for Intel-AMD x86 compatible systems.

[ Download antiX-Linux ]

The FreeType Project

The FreeType project develops free, portable and high-quality software solutions for digital typography. We focus on bringing small, efficient and ubiquitous products.

[ Download The FreeType Project ]

Double Commander

Double Commander is a cross platform open source file manager with two panels side by side. It is inspired by Total Commander and features some new ideas.

[ Download Double Commander ]

FreeImage

FreeImage is a library project for developers who would like to support popular graphics image formats (PNG, JPEG, TIFF, BMP and others). Some highlights are: extremely simple in use, not limited to the local PC (unique FreeImageIO) and Plugin driven!

[ Download FreeImage ]

mplayer-for-windows

MPlayer & MEncoder Builds for Windows

[ Download mplayer-for-windows ]

Notepad++ Python Script

A Python Scripting plugin for Notepad++ Complete easy script access to all of the editor’s features (including absolutely everything in Scintilla). Configurable menus and toolbar options, assign shortcuts to scripts.

[ Download Notepad++ Python Script ]

Launch4j Executable Wrapper

Cross-platform Java executable wrapper for creating lightweight Windows native EXEs. Provides advanced JRE search, application startup configuration and better user experience.

[ Download Launch4j Executable Wrapper ]

PostInstallerF

PostInstallerF will install all the software that Fedora doesn’t include by default, after running Fedora for the first time. Its easy for a new user. PostInstallerF contains everything that you need for your daily computing.

[ Download PostInstallerF ]

Legacy OS

Legacy OS Linux is an Operating System for old Pentium 3 and 4 PC’s. With over 200 menu choices for users to choose from Legacy OS 2.1 LTS brings together a collection of extremely useful applications that could make a Pentium III PC far more useful then a user could imagine. Install once and use for years to come. Also check out our other releases like Legacy OS 2.1 Gamer and Legacy OS 4 Mini. Install and Live CD

[ Download Legacy OS ]

Categories: Open Source

Community Choice Project of the Month Vote for April 2014

Wed, 03/26/2014 - 15:31

The vote for April 2014 Community Choice SourceForge Project of the Month is now available, and will run until 2014-04-04 00:00 UTC:

Vote here for the Community Choice SourceForge Project of the Month for April 2014

The candidates (in random order) are as follows:

VoIP monitor

VoIPmonitor is open source network packet sniffer with commercial frontend for SIP SKINNY RTP and RTCP VoIP protocols running on linux. VoIPmonitor is designed to analyze quality of VoIP call based on network parameters – delay variation and packet loss according to ITU-T G.107 E-model which predicts quality on MOS scale. Calls with all relevant statistics are saved to MySQL or ODBC database. Optionally each call can be saved to pcap file with either only SIP / SKINNY protocol or SIP/RTP/RTCP/T.38/udptl protocols. VoIPmonitor can also decode audio.

[ Download VoIP monitor ]

Subversion for Windows

Win32 build of Subversion. These binaries are built using Visual C++ 6.0 Should work on all flavours of Windows from Win2000 to Win8 and 2008 Server including server variants (not all tested). (1.7.x does not work on NT4 due to APR using new functions). Modules for Apache 2.2.x and 2.4.x (1.7.6 and up) is included. Language bindings are NOT tested. Source code is found at the Apache Subversion site at http://subversion.apache.org/ Code in this project is just a “Build script” and patches for VC6

[ Download Subversion for Windows ]

gnuplot development

Famous scientific plotting package.

[ Download gnuplot development ]

SparkyLinux

SparkyLinux is a Live Linux distribution created on the “testing” branch of Debian GNU/Linux. Featuring customized light desktops, multimedia plugins and selected set of apps.

[ Download SparkyLinux ]

MeshLab

MeshLab, a mesh processing system, for user assisted editing, cleaning, filtering and rendering of large unstructured 3D triangular meshes (typical 3D scanning meshes). The system relies for mesh processing tasks on the gpl VCG library (vcg.sf.net).

[ Download MeshLab ]

Free Pascal Compiler

A 32/64/16-bit Pascal compiler for Win32/64/CE, Linux, Mac OS X/iOS, FreeBSD, OS/2, Game Boy Advance, Nintendo NDS and DOS; semantically compatible with Delphi, Borland Pascal and Mac Pascal (partially) with extra features, e.g. operator overloading.

[ Download Free Pascal Compiler ]

Vtiger CRM

Vtiger CRM enables sales, support, and marketing teams to organize and collaborate to measurably improve customer experiences and business outcomes. Vtiger CRM also includes email, inventory, project management, and other tools, providing a complete the business management suite. Download Vtiger CRM here or sign up for a free 15-day free trial of the cloud-based application with free updates and support at https://www.vtiger.com/

[ Download Vtiger CRM ]

SMPlayer

SMPlayer is a free media player for Windows and Linux with built-in codecs that can also play and download Youtube videos. One of the most interesting features of SMPlayer: it remembers the settings of all files you play. So you start to watch a movie but you have to leave… don’t worry, when you open that movie again it will be resumed at the same point you left it, and with the same settings: audio track, subtitles, volume… SMPlayer is a graphical user interface (GUI) for the award-winning MPlayer, which is capable of playing almost all known video and audio formats. But apart from providing access for the most common and useful options of MPlayer, SMPlayer adds other interesting features like the possibility to play Youtube videos or download subtitles.

[ Download SMPlayer ]

LibreCAD

LibreCAD is a 2D CAD drawing tool based on the community edition of QCad LibreCAD has been re-structured and ported to qt4 and works natively cross platform OSX, Windows and Linux

[ Download LibreCAD ]

Categories: Open Source

Projects of the Week, March 24, 2014

Mon, 03/24/2014 - 21:19

Here’s the projects that we’re featuring this week on the front page of SourceForge.net:

Pinguy OS

Pinguy OS an out-of-the-box working operating system for everyone, not just geeks.

[ Download Pinguy OS ]

Zentyal Linux Small Business Server

Zentyal Linux Small Business Server aims at offering small and medium businesses (SMBs) a native drop-in replacement for Windows\u00ae Small Business Server and Microsoft\u00ae Exchange Server, that can be set up in less than 30 minutes and is both easy-to-use and affordable.

[ Download Zentyal Linux Small Business Server ]

Pandora FMS: Flexible Monitoring System

Pandora FMS is a performance & availability monitoring system, ready for big environments. It uses agents for local monitoring and can do several kinds of remote network monitoring (SNMP v3, TCP checks, remote WMI probes…) Agents works on Linux, Windows, AIX, HP-UX, Solaris and BSD systems. Highly scalable (up to 2000 nodes with one single server), completely web-driven and a multitenant interface. It has a very flexible ACL system and a lot of graphical reports and user-defined control screens.

[ Download Pandora FMS: Flexible Monitoring System ]

Little cms color engine

Little cms is a color management library. Implements fast transforms between ICC profiles. It is focused on speed, and is portable across several platforms (MIT license)

[ Download Little cms color engine ]

JSToolNpp

A javascript plugin for Notepad++. Douglas Crockford’s JSMin algorithm to minimize javascript code. My own algorithm to format javascript code. A JSON data viewer. Really helpful to javascript coder on Notepad++ and really easy to use it. Made in China.

[ Download JSToolNpp ]

TigerVNC

TigerVNC is an advanced VNC implementation. It is based on the fourth generation of VNC. TigerVNC also includes features from the TightVNC and TurboVNC projects. This includes accelerated JPEG compression. TigerVNC supports the latest X.Org X server.

[ Download TigerVNC ]

OGRE (O-O Graphics Rendering Engine)

An efficient, object-oriented hardware accelerated 3D engine. It abstracts the differences between APIs and platforms and allows scene-oriented coding through an easy to use object model. Adaptable to multiple scene types (indoor, outdoor, whatever)

[ Download OGRE (O-O Graphics Rendering Engine) ]

PostBooks ERP, accounting, CRM by xTuple

World’s #1 Open Source ERP, Accounting, CRM for SMBs. Mac, Windows, Linux and Mobile. Rich API to connect third-party apps. FREE user registration, demos and trial offers, plus commercial editions and add-ons at http://www.xTuple.com.

[ Download PostBooks ERP, accounting, CRM by xTuple ]

Hydrogen

Hydrogen is an advanced drum machine for GNU/Linux, Windows and Mac OS X. It’s main goal is to bring professional yet simple and intuitive pattern-based drum programming.

[ Download Hydrogen ]

Categories: Open Source

Projects of the Week, March 17, 2014

Mon, 03/17/2014 - 21:06

Here’s the projects that we’re featuring this week on the front page of SourceForge.net:

Wireshark

Wireshark is a powerful network protocol analyzer developed by an international team of networking experts. It runs on UNIX, OS X and Windows. (Looking for Ethereal? You’re in the right place. We switched names in May 2006 due to trademark issues.)

[ Download Wireshark ]

Dolibarr ERP – CRM

Dolibarr ERP – CRM is an easy to use ERP and CRM open source software (run as web php or standalone) for small to mid-sized businesses, foundations or freelancers (inventory, warehouse, order, invoice, shipment, POS, members for foundations, bank accounts…). Dolibarr is also available with auto-installers for users with no technical knowledges to install Dolibarr and all its prerequisites (Apache, Mysql, PHP) with just one package. Available platforms for such packages are: Windows, Debian, Ubuntu, Mint, Redhat, Fedora, OpenSuse, Mandriva, Mageia. Other platform can use the generic distribution. This is a modular product, than can be enhanced with tons of external modules to provide you features not available by default.

[ Download Dolibarr ERP - CRM ]

slackel

Slackel is a Linux distribution based on Slackware and Salix. It is fully compatible with Slackware and Salix but the difference is that it includes the current version of Slackware. So Slackware users can benefit from Slackel repositories. It is available in two editions, KDE and Openbox. Slackel disc images are offered in two different forms, Installation disc image and Live disc image. Slackel developed in Greece by Dimitris Tzemos.

[ Download slackel ]

JabRef

JabRef is a graphical application for managing bibliographical databases. JabRef is designed specifically for BibTeX bases, but can import and export many other bibliographic formats. JabRef runs on all platforms and requires Java 1.6 or newer.

[ Download JabRef ]

SparkyLinux

SparkyLinux is a Live Linux distribution created on the “testing” branch of Debian GNU/Linux. Featuring customized light desktops, multimedia plugins and selected set of apps.

[ Download SparkyLinux ]

rEFInd

rEFInd is a fork of the rEFIt boot manager. Like rEFIt, rEFInd can auto-detect your installed EFI boot loaders and it presents a pretty GUI menu of boot options. rEFInd goes beyond rEFIt in that rEFInd better handles systems with many boot loaders, gives better control over the boot loader search process, and provides the ability for users to define their own boot loader entries.

[ Download rEFInd ]

Free Pascal Compiler

A 32/64/16-bit Pascal compiler for Win32/64/CE, Linux, Mac OS X/iOS, FreeBSD, OS/2, Game Boy Advance, Nintendo NDS and DOS; semantically compatible with Delphi, Borland Pascal and Mac Pascal (partially) with extra features, e.g. operator overloading.

[ Download Free Pascal Compiler ]

VBA-M

Our goal is to improve upon VisualBoyAdvance by integrating the best features from the various builds floating around. In order to uncompress the downloaded package, you need WinRAR or 7-Zip: http://7-zip.org/

[ Download VBA-M ]

Subversion for Windows

Win32 build of Subversion. These binaries are built using Visual C++ 6.0 Should work on all flavours of Windows from Win2000 to Win8 and 2008 Server including server variants (not all tested). (1.7.x does not work on NT4 due to APR using new functions). Modules for Apache 2.2.x and 2.4.x (1.7.6 and up) is included. Language bindings are NOT tested. Source code is found at the Apache Subversion site at http://subversion.apache.org/ Code in this project is just a “Build script” and patches for VC6

[ Download Subversion for Windows ]

Categories: Open Source

March 2014 Project of the Month, Universal Media Server

Sat, 03/15/2014 - 12:30

For our March Community Choice Project of the Month, our community has selected Universal Media Server, a Multi-OS DLNA-compliant UPnP Media Server for streaming videos and other media over a network. The project founder, SubJunk, tells us about the project’s history, purpose, and direction.

SourceForge: Tell me about the Universal Media Server project please…
SubJunk: Our program serves media (video, audio and images) to many devices like TVs, gaming consoles, smart phones and more.

SF: What made you start this?
SJ: I started this project when I was working on another project called PS3 Media Server, so just a quick background on that: I had used PS3MS for years, and the project founder and developer shagrath – who is not only a very talented programmer but also a very cool guy – eventually lost interest since he didn’t use the program himself anymore. I started to make builds of it for myself and published them on the forum, and SharkHunter did his own builds too. Our builds became popular and that led to me and another developer, chocolateboy, being added as official developers to keep the project going. We made some great progress and further down the line more developers were added. Unfortunately this introduced instability in the program and I was spending more time fixing new bugs than anything else, and after a few releases with major bugs I decided to branch the project off to create Universal Media Server (and was joined shortly after by SharkHunter) with more of a focus on stability, and as the name suggests, support for a wider range of devices. Now we have a core team of 6: SharkHunter, valib, skeptical, DeFlanko, Optimus_prime and myself, as well as other frequent contributors who help with code and translations.

SF: Has the original vision been achieved?
SJ: I think so. We’ve fixed a lot of old bugs and implemented better quality control methods into our process which results in better stability, we have manual and automatic tests that are run before new releases, and we have a great community who are generous enough to give us useful feedback when we make a mistake so we can fix it pretty quickly.

SF: Who can benefit the most from your project?
SJ: It’s a great tool for anyone who wants to just use a media server program with no hassle. Many competing programs require you to wait for a media library to be built, which can take hours for those with lots of videos, but UMS is ready to use straight away with no configuration needed. We have lots of advanced features as well for those who want to use them, but I think our biggest advantage is that it just works.

SF: What is the need for this particular media server?
SJ: Aside from the things mentioned above, we have so many advantages! We offer subtitle support on every device, whether it supports subtitles or not, and we even support adding subtitles on the fly so you don’t have to find and download them yourself. We can output full quality DTS audio, which most servers compress, we interface with iTunes and DVDs, and there are many more specific benefits on our comparison page.

SF: What’s the best way to get the most out of using Universal Media Server?
SJ: To take advantage of our ability to stream media at top quality, it helps to have an audio receiver that can take DTS. Having a wired network is also useful for the best stability and quality, since the highest quality videos can sometimes need to be compressed for smooth transfer over wireless networks.

SF: What has your project team done to help build and nurture your community?
SJ: We are very grateful for our community, and our project members use our forums and issue tracker a lot. We give credit where it’s due by featuring the names of community members who help us in our release threads and readme files.

SF: Have you all found that more frequent releases helps build up your community of users? (Please provide insights if this is the case)
SJ: We have definitely found this. There are a lot of media servers out there, and a lot of them have been abandoned or are inactive, so it’s important to us to keep releasing new versions regularly to show our community that we are very active and will therefore be a good investment of their time.

SF: What is the next big thing for Universal Media Server?
SJ: We have been working hard on a web interface, which will allow us to support devices even without DLNA support. There is really no excuse for a modern device to not have DLNA support, but sometimes companies cut corners and that’s not the user’s fault, so we want to remedy those situations. We also have lots of other things in the works!

SF: How long do you think that will take?
SJ: It is already working and we are working on making it better, and will hopefully release a new alpha version with the web interface in the next month.

SF: Do you have the resources you need to make that happen?
SJ: We are a free program and we all do this out of pure motivation to improve the program. Sometimes people show their generosity by donating and thanks so much to everyone who has, it helps to cover our hosting costs.

Categories: Open Source

March 2014 Staff Pick Project of the Month, Win32 Disk Imager

Thu, 03/13/2014 - 16:00

The Win32 Disk Imager project is a father (Tobin) / son (Justin) team, plus another developer, Jeff. Tobin is a regular in our IRC channel (Freenode: #sourceforge). This is a pretty cool story. Read on!

SF: Tell us what the Win32 Disk Imager project can do for folks…

Tobin:  Win32DiskImager is a tool to take filesystem images and raw files and write them to memory devices (USB memory sticks, SD/CF cards, etc).  It can also read from the device and save the image as a backup.

SF: What was the problem you were trying to solve with this effort?

Tobin:  This tool was originally developed for the Ubuntu 9.04 (Jaunty) Netbook release, targeting users of Netbooks with Windows preloaded.  At the time, Ubuntu only shipped CD ISO images and Netbooks don’t have a CD drive.  This was created as an easy to use solution for Windows users interested in trying the Ubuntu.  I should note that the program went from concept to working release in a weekend.  Justin can comment more on this.

Justin: Tobin simply called me up on a Thursday after school (Senior year of high school if I remember correctly), and needed a screenshot by the end of the weekend so they could do preliminary documentation. I sent a screenshot only a few minutes later (gotta love developing with Qt) and then had to learn the win32 API *shudder* and by Friday night I had a fully functional prototype.

SF: Has your original vision been achieved?

Tobin:  For the targeted release, it went quite well.  After it was released in April, 2009, Ubuntu changed the format of their ISO images and combined the Desktop and Netbook images, so the tool was no longer needed for this purpose.  At this time, it was all but abandoned.

Justin: My original vision for it was simply a temporary tool for a temporary problem, that had other uses as well. After being asked to allow Ubuntu to take over the project and turn it into an Ubuntu specific tool, I kindly refused since I wanted to keep it a generalized tool with a wide range of uses. I didn’t quite imagine that that decision is what would ultimately allow it to explode in popularity like it has done.

SF: Who can benefit the most from Win32 Disk Imager?

Tobin:  Anyone that is using Windows based systems to do development work on embedded systems or users that want to test the latest Cyanogenmod on their Android devices.  I have also heard from users that use it to just back up their SD cards from their cameras.

SF: What’s the best way to get the most out of using Win32 Disk Imager?

Tobin:  The program is very simple in design.  The first thing to remember is to backup any important data you may have on your memory device before writing to it.  And also, read the readme.txt file.  If you have questions, please ask.  We try to answer all questions that we can.

SF: What is the Win32 Disk Imager release philosophy; do you all use the release early, release often precept?

Tobin:  There are currently two people actively maintaining it (Justin is focusing on another project also hosted on SourceForge).  We also have received a few translations from other users, which is great. Unfortunately, we don’t spend nearly as much time on it as we probably should.  We try to outline what features or bugs we want to resolve in the next release, then work towards that goal.  My biggest issues are the constantly changing API’s in Windows, and having to find out how to integrate them in when something breaks.

SF: If not or if so, why?

Tobin:  Time and resources are the biggest factors here.

SF: What are the key features from your most current release?

Tobin: As of v0.9, we support generating MD5 checksums for image verification (helpful for downloaded images), Drag and Drop images from Windows Explorer, and the ability to define a default directory for images through an environment variable (defaults to the user’s Downloads directory).  This works quite well in Windows XP, but we have seen issues in newer Windows releases due to API changes.

SF: What did the project team do to make sure these were completed in a timely manner?

Tobin:  Timely???  Due to our sporadic release cycle, just getting an updated release out was challenging enough.  :P

Justin: As a side note here the first release was dubbed the “Truck Stop” release since one of the guys debugging it was doing so from a truck stop since we had very little time to get the project ready for the initial release.

SF: What was the first big thing that happened for your project?

Tobin:  It wasn’t until mid-2010 when I had bought a Nook Color from Barnes and Noble that I discovered other interests in this program.  The guy selling the Nooks was trying to also sell a book on using the Nook. I told him I was a Linux developer and could pretty much figure it out on my own.  Then he showed me the chapter on “Rooting your Nook”. Glancing through it, I saw a screenshot of our program along with a url to the Wiki page instructions that I had written.

I immediately ran a Google search and found an entire community of users, mainly in the Android Hacker community, but also developers of embedded Linux systems and other types of devices.  There were also a large amount of open bugs.  Since Justin had moved on to other projects, I took over as lead maintainer, and along with Jeff, we have cleaned up all of the original bugs and added some new features along the way.

The other major event was moving the project to SourceForge (YEA!!!). This has helped out a lot, both in exposure and in the tools now available to us to make this project more noticeable. Since moving (and subsequently being targeted as a SF Project of the Week), our user base has grown a lot.  Last time I was at Barnes and Noble, I found 6 different publications recommending our tool to their target audiences.

SF: What helped make that happen?

Tobin:  For the first part, word of mouth, I guess.  I can definitely say that just being on SourceForge has been a big thing.

Justin: It’s quite interesting that this project had received such worldwide fame despite having zero forms of advertising on our part. I guess that’s what you call going viral.

SF: What was the net result for that event?

Tobin:  I recently received an email from a German magazine editor, saying they were going to write a feature on our project.  I have also seen countless reviews, blogs, and even several video tutorials on Youtube.  Downloads are continuously growing week over week (I check the stats daily while sipping my morning coffee).

SF: What is the next big thing for Win32 Disk Imager?

Tobin:  We have a lot planned for upcoming releases.  First and foremost is to move to either a newer release of mingw or something equivalent, as there are a lot of new API issues in Windows that aren’t addressed in the release we currently build against.  Once we get that resolved, we have a wish list of features we want to integrate, starting with image compression/decompression on the fly.

Justin: A couple things I’ve been experimenting with outside of the project was to possibly have the drop-down-box show not only the drive letter but also the label on the device (for example mine might show up as “F: TuxDrive”). This would help a lot of people I think since my own personal experience of safely removing the drive on XP where it only tells you the letter has been annoying when the computer has 3 or 4 different removable devices plugged in. Also, it would be nice to eventually support batch processing of multiple images since the program is now also being used a lot in major tech companies where they’re flashing dozens of cards all hooked up to one system.

SF: How long do you think that will take?

Tobin:  Hard to say.  We already missed our soft target of 1.0 for the end of 2013.  But we do have an installer in the tree now.  That was one of my goals for 1.0. Right now I am focusing on an updated tool base that supports the newer APIs for Windows 7/8.

Justin: As for the pieces I’d like to see, it might be difficult as I’m tiding up other projects, most notably my Open RPG Maker, before going off to college this fall. However, I may be able to squeeze enough time in there to get those two small parts easily done.

SF: Do you have the resources you need to make that happen?

Tobin:  We could definitely use more help.  We are always open to contributions. We have already received a few translations from users, along with some code contributions.  I would also like to thank Jeff B (skydvr68) for his contributions in both code and with the questions forum.

SF: If you had it to do over again, what would you do differently for Win32DiskImager?

Tobin:  I’ll let Justin answer the next few.

Justin: I don’t really think there is anything I’d do differently since the initial release, while a bit buggy, was still fully functional.

SF: Is there anything else I should know?

Tobin: If we can get our development environment issues resolved, 2014 will be a great year for new features.  Hopefully.

Justin: Really awesome to have this project recognized as project of the month, especially seeing some of the other projects that usually get nominated. Feels pretty awesome to have played a part in getting this project there.

Categories: Open Source

Continuous Delivery is for Open Source Too

Wed, 03/12/2014 - 16:34

This is a guest post from Stephen Connolly, CloudBees, Inc.

 

If you start to push for Continuous Delivery in the context of an open source project, you will often get push-back such as:

“One of the nice things about Open Source projects is that, well, it’s NOT work, it’s NOT a job.”

and

“[Open source projects] aren’t factories, churning out releases and code like widgets. We do that enough at our day-jobs.”

These are valid arguments. But they miss some key points.

  • People write commercial software for money.
  • People write open source software for passion.

There is still a transaction going on. It may not be one you can see or account for on a traditional balance sheet… but you can still measure it.

Passion is measured in engagement. When an open source project has lots of passion there are lots of contributors and a vibrant community is built up around it. When an open source project runs out of passion it becomes the tumbleweed of the open source forges: A repository with the last commit five years ago and nobody can checkout and build the code any more.

“If you have an apple and I have an apple and we exchange apples then you and I will still each have one apple. But if you have an idea and I have an idea and we exchange these ideas, then each of us will have two ideas.” – George Bernard Shaw

Passion does not work the same way as money does.

If I spend my passion developing a feature for an open source project and the community grows more passionate because of that feature, then my passion is restored and re-invigorated as part of the community… there is more passion after than before.

If I spend my passion developing a feature for an open source project and it gets dropped on the floor and ignored, however, my passion was wasted.

When you feel passionate for an open source project, then it is your responsibility to help grow the passion of that project’s community.

There are things we can do to help grow our project’s community and passion, one of those ways is to get releases out more often.

Leaving unreleased features / fixes in your source repository burns the passion of those members of the community who need those features / fixes – and of those who created them. The longer those changes stay unreleased, the more passion you are losing. To put it another way:

Continuous delivery – not just for your day job

Your day job wants continuous delivery because the new features / fixes are like inventory left half finished on the shop floor… it’s consumed resources but still cannot be sold. It’s overhead.

Your open source project wants continuous delivery because the new features / fixes are like inventory left half finished on the shop floor… it’s consumed community passion rather than growing it.

Now of course these the passion balance sheet works differently than a fiscal one… but there are some things that stay the same:

  • Continuous delivery is about making sure that improvements are delivered as efficiently as possible. Not as fast as possible because then you are cutting corners and perhaps lowering quality (which will cost you money / passion).
  • Continuous delivery becomes easier if you can automate – as much as possible – the early parts of the process. For most processes, the expensive parts are the human parts. In some sense the commercial projects have easier accounting here… it is easy to measure the fiscal cost of human processes, e.g. using time and motion studies. It is very difficult to measure the passion cost of human processes on volunteers in your community… but our intuition tells us that the cost is not small.
  • We maximise our return by getting new features / fixes out as early as possible.

The decision to run a release through your continuous delivery pipeline has a cost.

A good pipeline is almost completely automated with a few sanity manual checks at the penultimate step. These pipelines are therefore low cost… both in fiscal and in passion accounting terms.

A bad pipeline has lots of manual checks and steps scattered throughout. These pipelines are high cost… and if prone to failure, the cost can grow while you fight to get a release all the way through to the end.

You need to weigh the expected cost of executing your pipeline against the expected net gain you will get by having the new release delivered. Once that measure gives a net gain in your respective accounting metric… then it is time to cut a release.

Every situation is different, so it is no surprise that the balance will play out differently for different projects.

jenkins

One of the projects I am involved with is the Jenkins CI project. When it started out initially there were releases as often as necessary. There were some occasions where the project got a new release several times during the same day as Kohsuke added a new feature and then people found critical bugs in the new feature. This very fast release cadence was great for getting people engaged with the project… but it came with a cost… people just could not keep up to date with the releases. After a while, Kohsuke settled down to a weekly release cadence. There may not be a release every single week (for example, Kohsuke may not have access to cut a release while travelling abroad) but on average about 48 weeks of the year there is a release.

Is that weekly release schedule right for every project? No, in fact it isn’t even right for everyone in the Jenkins community. If we look at the usage statistics there are a lot of people using the newer versions. There is also a significant group of people in the community who don’t want to live on the bleeding edge but still need bug fixes. The solution is a second, slower train of releases in what is called the Jenkins LTS release line.

The fact that there are regular releases with the Jenkins project has, in my view, helped to grow the community. If somebody finds a bug in Jenkins and provides a patch to fix that bug, there is a very strong possibility that the patch will be applied in the next week’s release.

★★★★★ Excellent: I would contribute again

★★★★☆

★★★☆☆

★★☆☆☆

★☆☆☆☆ Poor: I would discourage others from contributing

Part of what makes the weekly releases work for Jenkins is that Kohsuke has heavily automated the release process.

 maven

Another project I am involved with is Apache Maven. On the Maven project, our current release process has a lot of manual steps. If we count the steps for releasing Maven itself… I lost count after at least 26 steps. Another issue is that, for legal reasons, the Apache board requires that Apache projects have to vote on releases. So each PMC member casting a vote on releasing has to

“…download the signed source code package, compile it as provided, and test the resulting executable on their own platform, along with also verifying that the package meets the requirements of the ASF policy on releases.” – http://www.apache.org/dev/release.html#approving-a-release

In short, we burn a lot of passion getting a release out the door. The result of that is that it is probably not currently possible for Apache Maven to maintain a release cadence faster than about once every 4-8 weeks… so we are looking into automating as much of the process as we can. It may be that Apache Maven will never have a faster cadence than once every 4-8 weeks… but making it cheaper to release at that cadence can only help grow the community passion.

Continuous delivery is more a collective state of mind than any one, set process or technology. If a project releases at all then it is practicing delivery. To see the benefits of continuous delivery, you just need to up your cadence. Things to look out for are:

  • Manual tasks that can be moved later in the process
  • Automated tasks that can be moved earlier in the process
  • Automated checks that can be created / moved as early as possible in the process
  • Redundant tasks and checks that can be removed entirely

 

Upping your cadence will come with some pain. The point is to identify the causes of the pain and reduce or remove them. If, at a later time, you decide the higher cadence of continuous delivery is not for you, the reduced pain of releasing will still remain as a benefit.

 jenkins-promotions

One example is a set of Jenkins jobs that I set up to help cut releases of Apache Maven. They are:

  • There is an initial job. This job is responsible for determining if there are any changes to the code since the last release. If there are changes then it triggers an evaluation of those changes.
  • There is a build job. This job is responsible for determining if an exact GIT hash identified by the initial job builds and passes all the unit tests. If that job passes, then it triggers an integration test
  • Finally the test job takes the distribution of Maven built by the build job and runs that through the integration test suite.

If the downstream jobs are successful, they add a badge to the initial job that kicked them off. When a build has all the badges, then an email is sent to the Maven developers list to notify them that there is something that could be released. This actually removes about 10 of the 26+ steps from the current Maven core release process.

If you want to say you are doing continuous delivery I would suggest you aim for the following levels:

Level 0: A new feature / confirmed fix of a bug committed to source control waits no longer than 3 months before a release with that new feature / fix is available. If you cannot meet this target don’t even try to claim your processes are continuous delivery

Level 1: A new feature / confirmed fix of a bug committed to source control waits no longer than 1 month before a release with that new feature / fix is available.

Level 2: A new feature / confirmed fix of a bug committed to source control waits no longer than 1 week before a release with that new feature / fix is available.

Level 3: A new feature / confirmed fix of a bug committed to source control waits no longer than 1 day before a release with that new feature / fix is available. You are a continuous delivery evangelist, people may hate you. You may need processes to support those in your community who cannot handle such a fast cadence.

Summary

Many open source projects have explicitly moved to time-based mostly fixed cadence releases. It may not be right for your project, but you cannot know until you try.

Experimenting with continuous delivery can help your project and may significantly grow your community’s passion… even if you don’t end up using continuous delivery after an experiment!

 

—Stephen Connolly
CloudBees, Inc.
www.cloudbees.com

sconnolly

Stephen Connolly has over 20 years experience in software development. He currently works for CloudBees, Inc as an Elite developer and architect. He is involved in a number of open source projects, including Jenkins. Stephen was one of the first non-Sun committers to the Jenkins project and developed the weather icons. Stephen lives in Dublin, Ireland – where the weather icons are particularly useful. Follow Stephen on Twitter and on his blog.

Categories: Open Source

Projects of the Week, March 10, 2014

Mon, 03/10/2014 - 17:14

Here’s the projects that we’re featuring this week on the front page of SourceForge.net:

Arch Bang

ArchBang is a simple GNU/Linux distribution which provides you with a lightweight Arch Linux system combined with the OpenBox window manager. Suitable for both desktop and portable systems – It is fast, stable, and always up to date.

[ Download Arch Bang ]

TripleA

TripleA is a turn based strategy game and board game engine, similar to Axis & Allies or Risk. Free to play online, TripleA comes with multiple games and over 100 more games can be downloaded from the user community. Supports single player vs AI, hot-seat, Play by Email and Forum, and a hosted Online lobby for live play online. Recreate World War 2 with the Axis pushing through to Moscow, Japan devouring the Pacific, and the Allies desperately fighting back. Or recreate Napoleon’s march across Europe, or Rome defeating the Carthaginian Empire, or Sauron conquering Middle Earth, or even Zombies taking over America! If you have ever played a game where you push little plastic/virtual pieces around, roll dice, conquer the lands of your enemy, & produce new pieces to conquer with, you will be able to jump right into TripleA!

[ Download TripleA ]

Ganib | Project Management Software

Ganib gives simpler ways to keep your projects organized and on track. Take advantage of easy features that help you quickstart and makes your team more efficient and productive. Open source Web based online agile project management collaboration software free, J2EE platform, MySql database with project dashboards & reporting. Organized Teams & Projects: Easily plan & manage projects with intuitive features to help your team deliver on time. Quickly focus on what’s important, easily select actions to take. Be efficient for everyday work, project tasks, important details, and timelines. Tasks: Set milestones, tasks, subtasks with duration and dependencies to teams better organized. Scrum: Communicate effectively with your team using scrum, wikis & discussions to make better decisions. Timesheet & Tracking: Track the time spent in real time using gTrack desktop tool with desktop screenshots. Bug Tracking: Manage bugs. Demo: http://www.ganib.com

[ Download Ganib | Project Management Software ]

PNotes

PNotes is light-weight, flexible, skinnable manager of virtual notes on your desktop. It supports multiple languages, individual note’s settings, transparency and scheduling. Absolutely portable as well – no traces in registry. PNotes.NET edition requires .NET framework 4 Client Profile and VC++ 2010 runtime libraries.

[ Download PNotes ]

salix

Salix is a linux distribution based on Slackware that is simple and easy to use. Salix aims to be completely backwards compatible with Slackware, so Slackware users can benefit from Salix repositories.

[ Download salix ]

pspp4windows

PSPP is a program for statistical analysis of sampled data. It is a free replacement for the proprietary program SPSS. PSPP has both text-based and graphical user interfaces. Project page: http://www.gnu.org/software/pspp/ See changelog: http://git.savannah.gnu.org/gitweb/?p=pspp.git;a=shortlog;h=refs/heads/master For support: https://lists.gnu.org/archive/html/pspp-users/ or e-mail: pspp-users-request@gnu.org For bugs: https://lists.gnu.org/archive/html/bug-gnu-pspp/ or email: bug-gnu-pspp-request@gnu.org

[ Download pspp4windows ]

uniCenta POS

Keep up-to-date – Visit uniCenta oPOS Community News http://sourceforge.net/projects/unicentaopos/news/ uniCenta oPOS is a multi-lingual POS (Point-Of-Sale) application designed for Touchscreens. It supports industry standard hardware and is capable of running on display sizes from as little as 800×600 upwards. Installing uniCenta oPOS is simple and fast and it comes packaged with its own built in Apache Derby Embedded database. It’s also multi-terminal, multi-location and supports a range of proven commercial grade databases such as Apache Derby Client/Server, MySQL, HSQLDB, PostgreSQL and Oracle 11g. It has a thriving and active self-serve Community here on Sourceforge. Source code can be downloaded from http://www.unicenta.com/downloads

[ Download uniCenta POS ]

Emmabuntüs

Emmabuntüs is a desktop Linux distribution based on Xubuntu 12.04 LTS (Long Term Support) made specifically for refurbished computers destined for humanitarian organisations, and to promote the discovery of Linux by beginners, as well as to extend the lifespan of hardware and to reduce over consumption & waste in electronics. It strives to be beginner-friendly and reasonably light on resources so that it can be used on older computers. It also includes many modern features, such as a large number of pre-configured programs for everyday use, dockbar for launching applications, easy installation of non-free software and media codecs, and quick setup through automated scripts. The distribution supports English, French, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese and German languages. When Jerry met Emma on the Ivory Coast: http://linuxblog.darkduck.com/2014/01/when-jerry-met-emma-on-ivory-coast.html All international reviews: http://distrowatch.com/table.php?distribution=emmabuntus

[ Download Emmabuntüs ]

Money Manager Ex

Money Manager Ex is an easy to use, money management application. It is a personal finance manager. It can be used to track your net worth, income vs expenses etc. It runs on Windows, Linux and Mac OSX.

[ Download Money Manager Ex ]

Categories: Open Source

ApacheCon US 2014, Denver, April 7-9 2014

Wed, 03/05/2014 - 18:40

apachecon_denverThe Apache Software Foundation is pleased to announce ApacheCon US 2014, which we’re presenting in conjunction with the Linux Foundation. The conference will be held in Denver, Colorado, and features three days, ten tracks of content on more than 70 of the Apache Software Foundation’s Open Source projects, including Apache OpenOffice, Apache Hadoop, Apache Lucene, and many others.

We’re especially pleased to welcome SourceForge as a media partner for this event.

See ApacheCon website for the full schedule, as well as the evening events, BOFs, Lightning Talks, and project summits.

Co-located with the event is the Cloudstack Collaboration Conference, the best place to learn about Apache CloudStack.

Apache OpenOffice has an entire day of content, including both technical and community talks. (See the agenda for the full list.)

Hadoop, and its ecosystem of Big Data projects, has more than five full days of content (two tracks on two days, one track on the other).

Other projects, such as Cordova, Tomcat, and the Apache http server, have a fully day, or two, of content.

If you want to learn more about Apache Allura (Incubating), an Open Source software forge (and also the code that runs SourceForge) we’ll have two presentations about Allura, by two of the engineers who work on that code: Dave Brondsema and Wayne Witzel. Learn how to use Allura to develop your own projects, and join the community to make the platform even better.

This is the place to come if you rely on any of the projects of the Apache Software Foundation, and if you want to hang out with the men and women who develop them. We’ve been doing this event since 1998, and this promises to be the best one yet, with more content than we’ve ever presented before.

Rich Bowen, Executive Vice President of the Apache Software Foundation and former SourceForge Community Growth Hacker

Categories: Open Source

Convertigo, Mobile Application Development Platform for Enterprises

Tue, 03/04/2014 - 14:08

convertigo-enterprise-mashup-logoThis is a guest blog post from Convertigo. Enterprise mobility projects are spreading like wildfire. When they deliver value, business leaders in every department seem to want more – and that’s when the bottleneck happens. Instead of connecting one data source to one type of mobile device, your IT infrastructure is faced with multiple device platforms, complex security issues, and disparate enterprise applications and data sources – many with no API.

To accommodate the many-device to many-platform mobile application integration scenario and the BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) paradigm that most IT teams operate within, Convertigo brings one of the most advanced Open Source Mobile Application Development Platform to Enterprises willing to embrace mobility in an industrial, secured and managed environment.

Convertigo platform features front-end cross-platform development tools linked with a powerful back-end orchestration middleware able to connect to any Enterprise back-office data and process whether there is an API or not.

Convertigo leverages standard open source technologies such as Eclipse, jQuery Mobile, PhoneGap and many others to build an industrial platform to build, run and manage any B2E, B2B and B2C mobile application connected to back office data.

Categories: Open Source