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The Latest Legal Developments in Open Source

Black Duck Software Press Releases - Fri, 05/09/2014 - 16:30

Open source software (OSS) has become a fundamental part of the IT infrastructure of virtually all companies. Such criticality naturally gives rise to legal issues as organizations protect their own interests in the context the sharing inherent with open source.

Recently there has been a shift from enforcement activity by non-profits to commercial entities with two lawsuits which enforce the GPLv2 being filed by commercial  companies in 2013. One of the lawsuits involves GPLv2 licensed code im a commercial product and has broader impacts for both commercial and open source  companies. Patent activity around open source has continued apace and contribution agreements are getting more attention as companies evolve from consuming open source to contribution back.

This webinar, presented by Black Duck with Karen Copenhaver, partner at Choate Hall & Stewart and Counsel for the Linux Foundation and Mark Radcliffe, partner at DLA Piper and General Counsel for the Open Source Initiative (OSI), will review:

  • The rise in importance of open source for commercial entities
  • Explain the lastest developments for OSS licenses, patents and contributor agreements.
  • What to look out for in the open source legal sphere during 2014.
Register Now
Categories: Vendor

A Guide to M&A Success

Black Duck Software Press Releases - Wed, 04/30/2014 - 16:30

Open source software is ubiquitous and widely used in development organizations to build better software faster. The day-to-day practice of using open source software is often uncontrolled, potentially creating unknown legal, business and operational risks arising from the often overlooked and misunderstood obligations found in many open source licenses.  As a result, acquiring companies are now focusing more heavily on open source and third party code in their due diligence practices to uncover issues before M&A transactions are completed.

Join this Webinar with Black Duck Software and Anthony Decicco, Partner at GTC Law Group and learn about the new industry norms with respect to open source due diligence.  

Attendees will learn:

  • The steps involved in the due diligence process
  • Possible impacts on a transaction, due diligence and definitive agreements   
  • Challenges and common concerns of acquirers and investors and ways to address these concerns well before a transaction
Register Now
Categories: Vendor

Talk Back: Voice Response Workflows with Speech Server 2007

MSDN Magazine RSS Feed - Tue, 04/15/2014 - 11:11
April 2008

Speech Server 2007 lets you create sophisticated voice-response applications with Microsoft .NET Framework and Visual Studio tool integration. Here’s how.
Categories: .NET

Performance: Scaling Strategies for ASP.NET Applications

MSDN Magazine RSS Feed - Tue, 04/15/2014 - 11:11
April 2008

Performance problems can creep into your Web app as it scales up, and when they do, you need to find the causes and the best strategies to address them.
Categories: .NET

Silverlight: Building Advanced 3D Animations with Silverlight 2.0

MSDN Magazine RSS Feed - Tue, 04/15/2014 - 11:11
April 2008

Animating with Silverlight is easier than you think. Here we create a 3D app that folds a polyhedron using XAML, C#, and by emulating the DirectX math libraries.
Categories: .NET

Interview++: Bjarne Stroustrup on the Evolution of Languages

MSDN Magazine RSS Feed - Tue, 04/15/2014 - 11:11
April 2008

Howard Dierking talks to the inventor of C++, Bjarne Stroustrup, about language zealots, the evolution of programming, and what’s in the future of programming.
Categories: .NET

Office Development: Manage Metadata with Document Information Panels

MSDN Magazine RSS Feed - Tue, 04/15/2014 - 11:11
April 2008

Here the author uses Document Information Panels in the Microsoft 2007 Office system to manipulate metadata from Office docs for better discovery and management.
Categories: .NET

Editor's Note: A Service-Oriented Editor's Note

MSDN Magazine RSS Feed - Tue, 04/15/2014 - 11:11
April 2008

Here is what Howard Dierking has to say about the differences between services and distributed applications and how he has approached services in his projects.
Categories: .NET

Toolbox: Logging Web App Errors, Learning LINQ, and More

MSDN Magazine RSS Feed - Tue, 04/15/2014 - 11:11
April 2008

See how to log Web application errors for better health monitoring, what to read if you’re thinking about LINQ, and which blog Scott recommends reading this month.
Categories: .NET

Sustainable Computing: Imagine Cup 2008: Competing for Change

MSDN Magazine RSS Feed - Tue, 04/15/2014 - 11:11
April 2008

For the 2008 Imagine Cup, students have been challenged to use technology to enable a sustainable environment. Finalists in the U.S. competition recently presented their solutions in Los Angeles, and MSDN Magazine was there to see the innovative ideas participants have come up with.
Categories: .NET

CLR Inside Out: Measure Early and Often for Performance, Part 1

MSDN Magazine RSS Feed - Tue, 04/15/2014 - 11:11
April 2008

In this month’s column, get the inside scoop on how to build performance into your apps from the start, rather than dealing with the fallout after you deploy them.
Categories: .NET

Basic Instincts: My Namespace Extensions with My Extensibility

MSDN Magazine RSS Feed - Tue, 04/15/2014 - 11:11
April 2008

In this month’s column, learn how to integrate your own My Namespace extension into the Visual Basic development environment using the My Extensibility feature.
Categories: .NET

Cutting Edge: ListView Tips and Tricks

MSDN Magazine RSS Feed - Tue, 04/15/2014 - 11:11
April 2008

This month, use nested ListView controls to create hierarchical views of data and extend the eventing model of the ListView by deriving a custom ListView class.
Categories: .NET

Foundations: Code Access Security in WCF, Part 1

MSDN Magazine RSS Feed - Tue, 04/15/2014 - 11:11
April 2008

Here we discuss code-access security in Windows Communication Foundation (WCF) and present a solution for enabling partially trusted clients for WCF services.
Categories: .NET

Test Run: Testing SQL Stored Procedures Using LINQ

MSDN Magazine RSS Feed - Tue, 04/15/2014 - 11:11
April 2008

Language Integrated Query makes lots of things easier. Here we put LINQ, or more specifically the LINQ to SQL provider, to use testing SQL stored procedures.
Categories: .NET

Service Station: Building a WCF Router, Part 1

MSDN Magazine RSS Feed - Tue, 04/15/2014 - 11:11
April 2008

Here we take a look at WCF clients and services, and explain how to tweak the addressing and message filtering behaviors so you can route services between them.
Categories: .NET

Windows with C++: Windows Imaging Component Basics

MSDN Magazine RSS Feed - Tue, 04/15/2014 - 11:11
April 2008

Windows Imaging Component (WIC) is an extensible framework for encoding, decoding, and manipulating images. See how to use WIC to encode and decode different image formats.
Categories: .NET

Going Places: Provisioning Mobile Devices

MSDN Magazine RSS Feed - Tue, 04/15/2014 - 11:11
April 2008

Learn how you can set up every mobile device in your company with a few lines of code and some XML--thanks to the provisioning APIs in the Windows Mobile SDK.
Categories: .NET

{ End Bracket }: The Magic of Software

MSDN Magazine RSS Feed - Tue, 04/15/2014 - 11:11
April 2008

Are the transparent computer screens in the movie Minority Report or the flashy fingerprint analysis software programs used on CSI closer than we think? Maybe so.
Categories: .NET

April 2014 Project of the Month, Free Pascal

SourceForge.net: Front page news - Tue, 04/15/2014 - 10:00

For our April Community Choice Project of the Month, our community has selected Free Pascal, an advanced open source compiler for Pascal and Object Pascal. The project founder, Florian Klaempfl, tells us about the project’s history, purpose, and direction.

SourceForge: Tell us about the Free Pascal project please…
Florian Klaempfl: Free Pascal is an OSS pascal compiler supporting different pascal dialects including modern Object Pascal (for more details see theFree Pascal Homepage). It is written itself in Object Pascal, so users do not have to learn another language if they want to improve their compiler.

SF: What made you start this?
FK: In the early nineties, I wrote chess programs using Turbo Pascal. TP was a 16 bit compiler so it didn’t take advantage of the i386 getting popular at this time. After trying some alternatives, none of them made me happy, I decided to write my own compiler. This was in 1992. The current code base
of FPC was started in 1993. Sounds like Linux at the beginning of Linux, right :) ?

SF: Has the original vision been achieved?
FK: In the sense having a 32 bit compiler pascal compiler yes, in the sense to use it for my chess programs, no. I never ported my chess programs to FPC.

SF: Who can benefit the most from your project?
FK: I think there are multiple groups who can benefit from it:

- People who want to learn only one programming language which allows them to use it for almost everything: FPC can be used to do big database applications but it can be also used to program embedded devices. It can used to write numerical applications but also to code for mobile devices.
- People who have a large Pascal/Object Pascal code base
- People who are interested in a programming language which offers a compromise between high
productivity and the advantages of native code.

Obviously, the most can benefit people who are part of all three groups.

SF: What is the need for this particular programming language?
FK: Modern Object Pascal supports most language features which are expected from an OOP language. In combination with its good readability it is a very powerful language.

Further, the concept of modern pascal allows very fast turn around times. While some people might say this does not matter with today’s machines, I still think it makes a difference: FPC rebuilds its own compiler sources (i386: ~330k lines) on an i7-4770 in 4.2 s. So no need for a cup of coffee while compiling a project.

SF: What’s the best way to get the most out of using Free Pascal?
FK: Using it in combination with Lazarus: a RAD built on top of FPC.

SF: What has your project team done to help build and nurture your community?
FK: I think the most important thing which helps to build and nurture the community is stability in
different aspects:
- we try to break never people’s code, so backward compatibility is an important thing
- we do heavy automated regression testing to avoid bugs being reintroduced, every night, regression tests are run with >100 different configurations and the results are collected in a central database. Developers get a daily summary of the
tests with information if regressions appeared.

Further, FPC tries to give everybody being interested in an working on an OSS pascal compiler a “home”. So the development directions are mainly driven by the contributors as long as two basic rules are obeyed: FPC is a pascal* compiler and other people’s code may not be broken**. Recent example: revived m68k support. It makes little sense to do so to get a lot of new users of FPC, but if somebody implements it, he is free to do so.

*This is subject to be discussed, “wirthian language” compiler might be also ok.
**Of course, sometimes this cannot be avoided.

SF: Have you all found that more frequent releases helps build up your community of users?
FK: FPC has a very slow release cycle: during the last years it is approx. one release per year. There are multiple reasons for this:
- FPC is almost 21 years old, so it has a certain maturity
- Building FPC from development head is not hard and normally done, see above, within a few minutes
- Due to its maturity and a development model grown over years, the development head is normally also very stable.
- We normally prepare binary releases and these binary are not just compiled, packed and uploaded but also tested. Due to the amount of platforms this takes considerable time so each release cycle eats also time which could be spent in other things.

SF: What was the first big thing that happened for your project?
FK: For me it was when the compiler was able to build its own sources, this was in 1995 after almost two years of work.

SF: What is the next big thing for Free Pascal (and/or feel free to talk more in depth about the “write once, compile anywhere” concept, sounds interesting)?
FK:The next big thing for FPC will be the 3.0 release: Besides a lot of new language features, bug fixes and improvements, 3.0 will extend the compile anywhere concept further. It is expected to be the first FPC release version which can output jvm code as well as i8086 code and maybe also the avr port will be in a usable shape.

SF: How long do you think that will take?
FK: We expect to release 3.0 in 2015.

SF: Do you have the resources you need to make that happen?
FK: Normally yes, the only question is what will be in 3.0.

SF: If you had it to do over again, what would you do differently for Free Pascal?
FK: Actually not much.

SF: Is there anything else we should know?
FK: I think the most interesting aspect is that FPC has no company in the background: it is developed by a community of people having either a need for it or having just fun working on it as their hobby.

Categories: Open Source