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Open Source

Introducing HTTPS for Project Websites

SourceForge.net: Front page news - Wed, 11/30/2016 - 17:54

We are very excited to offer HTTPS web hosting to all projects. With a single click, projects can opt-in to switch their web hosting from http://name.sourceforge.net to https://name.sourceforge.io Project admins can find this option in the Admin page, under “HTTPS”, naturally

Categories: Open Source

Google Summer of Code 2016 wrap-up: STE||AR

Google Open Source Blog - Tue, 11/29/2016 - 18:00
This is part of a series of guest posts from students, mentors and organization administrators who participated in Google Summer of Code (GSoC) 2016. GSoC is an annual program which pairs university students with mentors to work on open source software.


This summer the STE||AR Group was proud to mentor four students through Google Summer of Code. These students worked on a variety of projects which helped improve our software, HPX. This library is a distributed C++ runtime system which supports a standards compliant API and helps users scale their applications across thousands of machines.

The improvements to the code base will help our team and users of HPX around the world. A summary of our students’ projects:

Parsa Amini – HPX Debugger

Developing a better distributed debugging tool is essential to increase the programmability of HPX. Parsa’s project, Scimitar, aims to facilitate the debugging process for HPX programmers by extending the features of GDB, an existing debugger. The project then complements it with new commands for easier switching between localities across clusters, HPX thread debugging, awareness of internal HPX data structures, and semi-automated preparation for distributed debugging sessions. Additional functionality such as locating an object and viewing the queue information on each core is provided through using API provided by HPX itself. His work can be found on GitHub.

Aalekh Nigam – Implement a Map/Reduce Framework

This project aimed to expose a Map/Reduce programming model over HPX. During the summer, Aalekh was able to develop a single node implementation of HPXflow (map/reduce programming model) and laid the groundwork for the further multi-node version with database support. Although the initial task was limited to implementing the Map/Reduce model, he was also able to implement an improved dataflow model as well.

Minh-Khanh Do - Working on Parallel Algorithms for HPX::Vector

Minh-Khanh’s task was to take the parallel algorithms and add the functionality required to work on the segmented hpx::vector. Under his mentor John Biddscombe, he implemented the segmented_fill algorithm, which was successfully merged into the main codebase. Additionally, Minh-Khanh implemented the segmented_scan algorithm which includes inclusive and exclusive_scan. These changes are included in a pull request and have been merged. Using the segmented scan algorithm it is possible to perform tasks such as evaluating polynomials and to implement other algorithms such as quicksort.

Satyaki Upadhyay - Plugin Mechanism for thread schedulers in HPX

In HPX, schedulers are statically linked and must be built at compile-time. Satyaki’s project involved converting this statically linked scheme into a plugin system which would allow arbitrary schedulers to be dynamically loaded. These changes bring several benefits. They provide a layer of abstraction and follow the open/closed principle of software design as well as allowing developers to write their own custom schedulers while conforming to a uniform API. The project proceeded in two steps. The first involved the creation of plugin modules of the schedulers and registering them with HPX. The second step was to implement the loading and subsequent use of the chosen scheduler.

We would like to thank our students and mentors for the time that they have contributed to HPX this summer. In addition, we would like to thank Google for the opportunity that they provided the STE||AR Group to work with developers around the globe as well as the ability for students to interact with vibrant open source projects worldwide.

By Adrian Serio, Organization Administrator for The STE||AR Group
Categories: Open Source

It’s that time again: Google Code-in starts today!

Google Open Source Blog - Mon, 11/28/2016 - 21:18
Today marks the start of the 7th year of Google Code-in (GCI), our pre-university contest introducing students to open source development. GCI takes place entirely online and is open to students between the ages of 13 and 17 around the globe.
The concept is simple: complete bite-sized tasks (at your own pace) created by 17 participating open source organizations on topic areas you find interesting:

  • Coding
  • Documentation/Training
  • Outreach/Research
  • Quality Assurance
  • User Interface

Tasks take an average of 3-5 hours to complete and include the guidance of a mentor to help along the way. Complete one task? Get a digital certificate. Three tasks? Get a sweet Google t-shirt. Finalists get a hoodie. Grand Prize winners get a trip to Google headquarters in California.

Over the last 6 years, 3213 students from 99 countries have successfully completed tasks in GCI. Intrigued? Learn more about GCI by checking out our rules and FAQs. And please visit our contest site and read the Getting Started Guide.

Teachers, if you are interested in getting your students involved in Google Code-in you can find resources here to help you get started.

By Mary Radomile, Open Source Programs Office
Categories: Open Source

Projects of the Week, November 28, 2016

SourceForge.net: Front page news - Mon, 11/28/2016 - 06:35

Here are the featured projects for the week, which appear on the front page of SourceForge.net:

LibreCAD

LibreCAD is an open-source cross-platform 2D CAD program, which is translated in over 30 languages. http://translate.librecad.org LibreCAD is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it under the terms of the GNU General Public License version 2. This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful, but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. License: https://www.gnu.org/licenses/gpl-2.0.html Source: https://github.com/LibreCAD/LibreCAD/releases Track the latest development: https://github.com/LibreCAD/LibreCAD/milestones https://github.com/LibreCAD/LibreCAD/commits/master Create bug reports and feature requests: https://github.com/LibreCAD/LibreCAD/issues Get help: – http://forum.librecad.org – http://wiki.librecad.org
[ Download LibreCAD ]


slackel

Slackel is a Linux distribution based on Slackware and Salix. It is fully compatible with Slackware and Salix but the difference is that it includes the current version of Slackware. So Slackware users can benefit from Slackel repositories. It is available in three editions, KDE, Openbox and Fluxbox. Slackel disc images are offered in two different forms, Installation disc image and Live disc image. Slackel is developed in Greece by Dimitris Tzemos.
[ Download slackel ]


Wine

Wine is an Open Source implementation of the Windows API on top of X and Unix. Wine provides both a development toolkit for porting Windows sources to Unix and a program loader, allowing many unmodified Windows binaries to run on x86-based Unixes.
[ Download Wine ]


DisplayCAL

DisplayCAL (formerly known as dispcalGUI) is a graphical user interface for the display calibration and profiling tools of Argyll CMS, an open source color management system. Calibrate and characterize your display devices using one of the many supported measurement instruments, with support for multi-display setups and a variety of available settings like customizable whitepoint, luminance, tone response curve as well as the option to create accurate look-up-table ICC profiles as well as some proprietary 3D LUT formats. Check the accuracy of profiles and 3D LUTs via measurements.
[ Download DisplayCAL ]


SynWrite add-ons

Collection of add-ons for SynWrite editor.
[ Download SynWrite add-ons ]


plantuml

PlantUml allows to quickly create some UML diagram using a simple textual description language.
[ Download plantuml ]


TrouSerS

TrouSerS – An open-source TCG Software Stack implementation.
[ Download TrouSerS ]


Berryboot Updated OS Images

This is the biggest list of OS images for Berryboot. All these images have been tested before public availability. The original OS images were downloaded from their respective official websites, I did not modified any data of the original nor converted OS images. I convert most of the OS images by using this method: http://www.berryterminal.com/doku.php/berryboot/adding_custom_distributions. RetroPie and others already have OS images for Berryboot, I just compress it and serve as a mirror. Fedora OS images were converted by using this tool: https://github.com/sjenning/rpi2-fedora-image-builder. I’m not part of the Berryboot project, I’m just a web developer with a Raspberry Pi 2. I cannot offer full support on these images. However, if you find any issue, please contact me and I’ll look into it. You can request OS images at: http://berryboot.alexgoldcheidt.com/request-os-images/
[ Download Berryboot Updated OS Images ]


VeraCrypt

VeraCrypt is a free disk encryption software brought to you by IDRIX (https://www.idrix.fr) and based on TrueCrypt 7.1a. It adds enhanced security to the algorithms used for system and partitions encryption making it immune to new developments in brute-force attacks. It also solves many vulnerabilities and security issues found in TrueCrypt. This enhanced security adds some delay ONLY to the opening of encrypted partitions without any performance impact to the application use phase. This is acceptable to the legitimate owner but it makes it much harder for an attacker to gain access to the encrypted data. All released files are PGP signed with key ID=0x54DDD393, available on key servers and downloadable at https://www.idrix.fr/VeraCrypt/VeraCrypt_PGP_public_key.asc VeraCrypt can mount TrueCrypt volumes. It also can convert them to VeraCrypt format. Documentation: https://veracrypt.codeplex.com/documentation FAQ : https://veracrypt.codeplex.com/wikipage?title=FAQ
[ Download VeraCrypt ]

Categories: Open Source

JHipster IDE

Date Created: Sat, 2016-11-26 14:43Date Updated: Mon, 2016-11-28 13:28Submitted by: Serano Colameo

JHipster-IDE is an Xtext DSL which provides texual editing support of JHipster Domain Language files for pupular IDEs and editors such as Eclipse, IDEA and Visual Studio Code. Thanx to Xtext, JHipster-IDE provides the features we have come to expect from modern IDE editors.

For more information please refer to our web page at JHipster IDE.

Categories: Open Source

LangLocker

Date Created: Sat, 2016-11-26 10:11Date Updated: Mon, 2016-11-28 09:13Submitted by: Andrey Mogilev

An Eclipse plugin which blocks unwanted input language switches (like English to Russian) while working in IDE.

In order to lock the current input language, run the 'Lock/unlock input language' command, or click on the corresponding button on the top panel, which looks like a lock with 'EN' characters on it. In order to unlock, do the same thing again.

Categories: Open Source

Registration Open | Eclipse Converge

Eclipse News - Fri, 11/25/2016 - 20:30
Discover the newest Eclipse Community event. Join us in San Jose alongside Devoxx US.
Categories: Open Source

FOSDEM PGDay 2017 & FOSDEM Devroom Call for Papers

PostgreSQL News - Fri, 11/25/2016 - 01:00

FOSDEM PGDay 2017 is a one day conference held this year on February 3rd followed immediately by the two day FOSDEM conference in Brussels at which we'll be hosting additional sessions on February 5th.

For more information on FOSDEM PGDay, please see:

https://2017.fosdempgday.org/

For more information on FOSDEM, please see:

https://fosdem.org/2017/

The call for papers for both the PGDay and FOSDEM Devroom has now been extended until midnight CET, 4th December. If you would like to submit a talk, please see the website:

https://2017.fosdempgday.org/callforpapers/

Talks may be on any topic related to PostgreSQL in some way. Suggested topic areas include:

  • Developing applications with or for PostgreSQL
  • Administering large scale PostgreSQL installations
  • Case studies and/or success stories of PostgreSQL deployments (or interesting failures)
  • PostgreSQL tools and utilities
  • PostgreSQL internals hacking
  • Community and local user groups
  • Tuning and performance improvements
  • Migration from other database systems
  • Scaling, Clustering and High Availability
  • Replication
  • Recovery and Backup strategies
  • Benchmarking and hardware
  • PostgreSQL related products
  • DevOps and continuous deployment/configuration/integration around PostgreSQL

Of course, we're happy to receive proposals for talks on other PostgreSQL related topics as well.

NOTE: Please submit talks through our website for both the PGDay and FOSDEM Devroom. DO NOT use the FOSDEM Pentabarf system as we are notmanaging the PostgreSQL talks though it.

The PostgreSQL Europe team will also have a table throughout the FOSDEM event; please feel free to stop by to chat with us about PostgreSQL and pickup some swag!

Categories: Database, Open Source

Open IoT Challenge 3.0 | Extended Deadline

Eclipse News - Thu, 11/24/2016 - 19:12
The submission deadline for the Open IoT Challenge 3.0 has been extended to November 30 @ 11:59 PM PT.
Categories: Open Source

Source Code Translation in Eclipse

Date Created: Thu, 2016-11-24 07:59Date Updated: Fri, 2016-12-09 07:45Submitted by: dtestehan

Every now and then a developer has to work on a code base that is in a language that is unknown to him. In this case, he would need to copy variable, class, method names to Google Translate to see what they actually mean.

The Source Code Translation in Eclipse tries to help such developers, by providing a popup with the translated words, when hovering the mouse over them. The plugin is able to handle compound words or phrases that use camelCase or underscore "_" as separation methods.

For the plugin to work, a properties file containing the word to be translated, and the translation needs to be created and added from the Preferences section of the plugin.

For help/suggestions contact me at tdan89@yahoo.com

Dan Testehan

Categories: Open Source

Eclipse Newsletter | Eclipse Loves Science

Eclipse News - Thu, 11/24/2016 - 12:08
Let's science the sh*t out of this month's newsletter!
Categories: Open Source

“Community Choice” Project of the Month Vote – January 2017

SourceForge.net: Front page news - Thu, 11/24/2016 - 03:03

The vote for January 2017 Community Choice SourceForge Project of the Month is now available, and will run until December 15, 2016 12:00 UTC.


MediathekView

Das Programm MediathekView durchsucht die Mediatheken verschiedener öffentlich-rechtlicher Sender (3Sat, ARD, ARTE, KiKa, MDR, ORF, SRF, ZDF etc.), lädt Beiträge daraus herunter oder spielt diese ab (mit VLC Media Player oder mit einem Programm eigener Wahl). Es können auch Sendereihen/Serien abonniert werden. Unterstützung Eine finanzielle Unterstützung für die Unkosten der Infrastruktur wird gerne angenommen

Categories: Open Source

A New Meeting Place for the Eclipse Community

Eclipse News - Wed, 11/23/2016 - 23:03
Why you should attend the new Eclipse Community conference in San Jose, March 2017.
Categories: Open Source

Eclipse Converge | CFP Open

Eclipse News - Wed, 11/23/2016 - 23:00
CFP open for the newest Eclipse Foundation event. Join us in San Jose, CA, March 2017.
Categories: Open Source

Stories from Google Code-in: Sugar Labs and Systers

Google Open Source Blog - Wed, 11/23/2016 - 18:00
Google Code-in (GCI) is our annual contest that gives students age 13 to 17 experience in computer science through contributions to open source projects. This blog post is the final installment in our series reflecting on the experiences of Google Code-in 2015 grand prize winners. Be sure to check out the first three posts.

The Google Code-in contest begins on Monday, November 28th at 9am PT for students. Right now you can learn more about the 17 mentoring organizations that students will be able to work with by going to the contest site. To get students excited for GCI 2016, we’re sharing three more stories from GCI 2015 grand prize winners. These stories illustrate how global the competition is, the challenges students face and the valuable skills they learn working with these open source organizations.

IMG_20160614_152138.jpgA group of Google Code-in 2015 mentors joined grand prize winners for a day of exploring
San Francisco including the iconic Golden Gate Bridge.First up is the story of Ezequiel Pereira, a student from Uruguay who worked with Sugar Labs. Sugar Labs is the organization behind Sugar, the operating system for the OLPC XO-1 which the Uruguayan government has distributed to public primary schools. The XO-1 was Ezequiel’s first computer.
Ezequiel’s curiosity in computer science was piqued when a technician came to his school to solve a simple bug that was affecting most XO’s. The technician used the command line which, up to that point, Ezequiel thought was useless. Realizing that the command line offered him a lot of power, Ezequiel began his exploration.
He discovered Google Code-in by reading about another Uruguayan teenager, one who was a grand prize winner in Google Code-in 2012. Ezequiel jumped into the contest and participated for several years expanding his skills before finishing as a grand prize winner of Google Code-in 2015. Along the way Ezequiel got comfortable with IRC and began helping other students, even finding new friends among along the way.

Next we have Sara Du from the United States. Sara had been coding for six months when she discovered Google Code-in on Christmas Eve, halfway through the competition. She found lots of interesting tasks, but had trouble finding the right organization to focus on before selecting Systers.
Like many students, Sara was able to quickly jump into code but spent a couple days just getting acquainted with Git and GitHub. This is something we hear from a lot of students and it’s just one of the skills that they pick up by working on real-world projects, along with testing and communication.
Another challenge Sara faced was working with a mentor 16 time zones away from her, which meant that correspondence would often take a day or two. While this was a challenge, she found the long feedback loop encouraged her to get on the Slack channel and reach out to other contributors for help. Ultimately, this made her even more a part of the Systers community.
Sara said Google Code-in was one of the most awesome experiences she’s had and has this advice to offer future participants: “The organization you end up working with has a vibrant community of hackers from everywhere; try to interact with them and you will be sure to learn from others as they will from you!”

Last, but certainly not least, we have Ahmed Sabie, a student from Canada who also worked with Systers. Ahmed started coding competitively several years ago, focusing on graph theory, dynamic programming and data structures. He loved the problem solving, but knew that these competitions took place in a sandbox. To grow, Ahmed would need to explore.
Enter Google Code-in. Ahmed was most comfortable with Python and saw that the Systers Volunteer Management System used that language, so that’s where he started.
Ahmed, like many students and even professional developers, spent much of his first week setting up his development environment. It was a grueling process but with the help of search and the people in the Systers Slack channel he was finally able to see the project’s login screen.
As he completed easy tasks, Ahmed moved on to more difficult tasks and began to help other students, many who got stuck on the same issues he had encountered earlier. Ahmed found that each task provided an opportunity to stretch his skills a little bit more. He was excited about how quickly he was learning. Though Ahmed learned a lot on his own, he says the vast majority of what he learned was through the help of other people -- students, mentors and other project contributors -- and that he felt like he was truly a part of the Systers community by the end of the process. 
Ahmed’s favorite task was an appropriate finale for the competition: he added multilingual support to an application he had worked on and added the French translation.“Overall, Google Code-in was the experience of a lifetime. It set me up for the future, by teaching me relevant and critical skills necessary in software development. I have contributed to a good cause, and met fantastic mentors and friends along the way. Open source development is not a onetime thing, it is an ongoing process. I hope to continue to be part of it, and to me it is a form of volunteering and giving back to the community.” - Ahmed Sabie
With that, we conclude our series of posts reflecting on Google Code-in 2015. We thank Ezequiel, Sara, Ahmed and all the other participants for sharing their stories and contributing to the software we all rely on. We hope you will join us in carrying on the tradition with Google Code-in 2016!
By Josh Simmons, Open Source Programs Office
Categories: Open Source

DbWrench Database Design 4.0 Released

PostgreSQL News - Tue, 11/22/2016 - 01:00

Version 4.0 of DbWrench is now available for download.

This release marks the switch from version 3 to version 4 of the product cycle. This release focused on the complete replacement of the editor code complete framework. We believe the new code complete framework is more compact and much more responsive. Also the look and styling for the database documentation has been improved.

It is our hope that these improvement will make DbWrench easier to use and make you more productive.

A free trial download of this latest version is available at www.dbwrench.com.

Thank you for your continued support of our product!

Categories: Database, Open Source

mesfavoris

Date Created: Mon, 2016-11-21 16:42Date Updated: Thu, 2016-12-22 03:47Submitted by: CĂ©dric Chabanois

Mesfavoris is an eclipse plugin that allows you to bookmark your files and share them with your team using GDrive.

Features :
* bookmark files and urls
* save your bookmarks on GDrive so that you can use them from your desktop and laptop computer.
* share some of your bookmarks
* bookmarks can resist changes in the files thanks to Bitap algorithm
* numbered bookmarks

Categories: Open Source

Projects of the Week, November 21, 2016

SourceForge.net: Front page news - Mon, 11/21/2016 - 06:05

Here are the featured projects for the week, which appear on the front page of SourceForge.net:

antiX-Linux

antiX is a fast, lightweight and easy to install linux live CD distribution based on Debian Testing for Intel-AMD x86 compatible systems.
[ Download antiX-Linux ]


dcm4che, a DICOM Implementation in JAVA

dcm4che is an implementation of DICOM and IHE actors in Java. Homepage: http://www.dcm4che.org, Google Group: http://groups.google.com/group/dcm4che?hl=en, Wiki: http://www.dcm4che.org/confluence, Issue Tracking: http://www.dcm4che.org/jira
[ Download dcm4che, a DICOM Implementation in JAVA ]


OS X Portable Applications

OS X FOSS portable applications are packaged so you can carry around on any portable device, USB thumb drive, iPod, portable hard drive, memory card, other portable device (or also on your internal hard disk), taking your preferences with you.
[ Download OS X Portable Applications ]


ArchiveOS

Archive of Operating Systems mission is saving the great job of many great people whose created Open Source and/or Freeware operating systems. The systems we archive are based on Linux, BSD, or other, independent technology.
[ Download ArchiveOS ]


antergos

The purpose of Antergos is to provide a modern, elegant and powerful operating system based on one of the best Linux distributions out there, Arch Linux. Antergos is easy to use and very customizable It is open source, free and based on the fast and lightweight Arch Linux. Antergos uses the official Arch Linux package repositories and the AUR (user-submitted packages) along with its own software repositories. As with other GNU/Linux systems, Antergos is virtually free of viruses and spyware
[ Download antergos ]


TenFourFox

This is the download repository for TenFourFox 24 and beyond, the Firefox port for Power Macintosh computers running 10.4 and 10.5. TenFourFox is not an official Mozilla product and is not a Mozilla-maintained build of Firefox. PowerPC forever! Our SF repo is only for hosting our current and future downloads at this time (thanks, SourceForge!); Github hosts our wiki, FAQ and issue tracker: https://github.com/classilla/tenfourfox/ Do not open trouble tickets here — they will be DELETED. If you are an end-user requiring support, please visit our Tenderapp support ticketing site: http://tenfourfox.tenderapp.com/ Read the TenFourFox Development blog for what’s next: http://tenfourfox.blogspot.com/
[ Download TenFourFox ]


Sky Chart / Cartes du Ciel

SkyChart is a software to draw chart of the night sky for the amateur astronomer from a bunch of stars and nebulae catalogs. See main web page for full download. This software is part of a full suite for astronomical observation: https://sourceforge.net/projects/ccdciel/ https://sourceforge.net/projects/indistarter/ https://sourceforge.net/projects/eqmodgui/ Requirement: https://sourceforge.net/projects/libpasastro/ See also: https://sourceforge.net/projects/indi/
[ Download Sky Chart / Cartes du Ciel ]


Uniform Server

The Uniform Server is a lightweight server solution for running a web server under the WindowsOS. Less than 24MB! Modular design, includes the latest versions of Apache2, Perl5, PHP (switch between PHP53, PHP54, PHP55 or PHP56), MySQL5 or MariaDB5, phpMyAdmin or Adminer4. Run from either hard drive or USB memory stick… NO INSTALLATION REQUIRED! NO REGISTRY DUST! Just UNPACK and FIRE UP!
[ Download Uniform Server ]


Ultimate Edition

Ultimate Edition Linux, previously “Ubuntu Ultimate Edition”. We cater to a large base of *nix users including, but certainly not limited to gamers & low resource computers. We have a Ultimate Edition for virtually any user.
[ Download Ultimate Edition ]

Categories: Open Source

Launch of the Israel PostgreSQL Community Website

PostgreSQL News - Mon, 11/21/2016 - 01:00

We are pleased to announce the launch of The Israel PostgreSQL Community website.

Our goal is to promote PostgreSQL knowledge and usage in Israel by collaboration of all interested in it users.

The site will publish PostgreSQL global and regional community news and events.

We will promote PostgreSQL usage among students and pupils by providing lectures in colleges and high schools. We'll be glad for any help from the community for any relevant presentation content that can be useful for those populations.

There is a forum with variety of topics and blog section with relevant posts.

We are going to organize PGDAY at the beginning of the next year in Israel.

We are calling all PostgreSQL users in Israel to join effort and build strong and valuable community.

We initiated the process of product documentation translation. This is the time consuming process and we'll be glad if other users will be able to help us.

Please visit us at http://postgresql.org.il/.

Categories: Database, Open Source

Google Summer of Code 2016 wrap-up: Linux XIA

Google Open Source Blog - Fri, 11/18/2016 - 19:00
We're sharing guest posts from students, mentors and organization administrators who participated in Google Summer of Code 2016. This is the fifth post in that series and there are more on the way.


Linux XIA is the native implementation of XIA, a meta network architecture that supports evolution of all of its components, which we call “principals,” and promotes interoperability between these principals. It is the second year that our organization, Boston University / XIA, has participated in Google Summer of Code (GSoC), and this year we received 31 proposals from 8 countries.

Our ideas list this year focused on upgrading key forwarding data structures to their best known versions. Our group chose the most deserving students for each of the following projects:

Accelerating the forwarding speed of the LPM principal with poptrie

Student André Ferreira Eleuterio and mentor Cody Doucette implemented the first version of the LPM principal in Linux XIA for GSoC 2015. The LPM principal enables Linux XIA to leverage routing tables derived from BGP, OSPF, IS-IS and any other IP routing protocol to forward XIA packets natively, that is, without encapsulation in IP. For GSoC 2016, student Vaibhav Raj Gupta from India partnered with mentor Cody Doucette to speed up the LPM principal by employing a state-of-the-art data structure to find the longest prefix matching using general purpose processors: poptrie.

Upgrading the FIB hash table of principals to the relativistic hash table

Principals that rely on routing flat names have used a resizable hash table that supports lockless readers since 2011. While this data structure was unique in 2011, in the same year, relativistic hash tables were published. The appeal to upgrade to relativistic hash tables was twofold: reduced memory footprint per hashed element, and the fact they were implemented in the Linux kernel in 2014. Student Sachin Paryani, also from India, worked with mentor Qiaobin Fu to replace our resizable hash table with the relativistic hash table.

Google Summer of Code nurtures a brighter future. Thanks to GSoC, our project has received important code contributions, and our community has been enlarged. It was rewarding to learn that two of our GSoC students have decided to pursue graduate school after their GSoC experience with us: Pranav Goswami (2015) and Sachin Paryani (2016). We hope these examples will motivate other students to do their best because the world is what we make of it.

By Michel Machado, Boston University / XIA organization administrator
Categories: Open Source