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Open Source

Grumpy: Go running Python!

Google Open Source Blog - Wed, 01/04/2017 - 18:00
Google runs millions of lines of Python code. The front-end server that drives youtube.com and YouTube’s APIs is primarily written in Python, and it serves millions of requests per second! YouTube’s front-end runs on CPython 2.7, so we’ve put a ton of work into improving the runtime and adapting our application to work optimally within it. These efforts have borne a lot of fruit over the years, but we always run up against the same issue: it's very difficult to make concurrent workloads perform well on CPython.

To solve this problem, we investigated a number of other Python runtimes. Each had trade-offs and none solved the concurrency problem without introducing other issues.
MeatGrinder.png
So we asked ourselves a crazy question: What if we were to implement an alternative runtime optimized for real-time serving? Once we started going down the rabbit hole, Go seemed like an obvious choice of platform since its operational characteristics align well with our use case (e.g. lightweight threads). We wanted first class language interoperability and Go’s powerful runtime type reflection system made this straightforward. Python in Go felt very natural, and so Grumpy was born.

Grumpy is an experimental Python runtime for Go. It translates Python code into Go programs, and those transpiled programs run seamlessly within the Go runtime. We needed to support a large existing Python codebase, so it was important to have a high degree of compatibility with CPython (quirks and all). The goal is for Grumpy to be a drop-in replacement runtime for any pure-Python project.

Two design choices we made had big consequences. First, we decided to forgo support for C extension modules. This means that Grumpy cannot leverage the wealth of existing Python C extensions but it gave us a lot of flexibility to design an API and object representation that scales for parallel workloads. In particular, Grumpy has no global interpreter lock, and it leverages Go’s garbage collection for object lifetime management instead of counting references. We think Grumpy has the potential to scale more gracefully than CPython for many real world workloads. Results from Grumpy’s synthetic Fibonacci benchmark demonstrate some of this potential:



Second, Grumpy is not an interpreter. Grumpy programs are compiled and linked just like any other Go program. The downside is less development and deployment flexibility, but it offers several advantages. For one, it creates optimization opportunities at compile time via static program analysis. But the biggest advantage is that interoperability with Go code becomes very powerful and straightforward: Grumpy programs can import Go packages just like Python modules! For example, the Python snippet below uses Go’s standard net/http package to start a simple server:

from __go__.net.http import ListenAndServe, RedirectHandler

handler = RedirectHandler('http://github.com/google/grumpy', 303)
ListenAndServe('127.0.0.1:8080', handler)

We’re excited about the prospects for Grumpy. Although it’s still alpha software, most of the language constructs and many core built-in types work like you’d expect. There are still holes to fill — many built-in types are missing methods and attributes, built-in functions are absent and the standard library is virtually empty. If you find things that you wish were working, file an issue so we know what to prioritize. Or better yet, submit a pull request.

Stay Grumpy!

By Dylan Trotter, YouTube Engineering
Categories: Open Source

Rails Girls Summer of Code: Changing the face of tech

Google Open Source Blog - Wed, 01/04/2017 - 16:50
This is a guest post from Laura Gaetano who organizes Rails Girls Summer of Code, a global fellowship program inspired by Google Summer of Code.

Have you seen that picture of Margaret Hamilton, the NASA engineer who worked on the computer systems for the Apollo 11 launch? She’s standing next to the human-sized pile of listings of the Apollo Guidance Computer source code that she worked on. Do you know about Ada Lovelace, often cited as the very first computer programmer?

From World War II until the 1980s, women engineers and women computer operators were fairly common. There was a steady rise in women entering STEM fields, and young girls had role models and strong women to look up to. We're well acquainted with the drop in female engineering graduates worldwide after this time period, and the subsequent drop in the percentage of women entering the world of tech. We're here to help change that, and reverse the trend.

Rails Girls Summer of Code (RGSoC) aims to bring more diversity into the world of tech — specifically, into the world of open source software, where women make up a mere 11% of the community. The global program offers 3-month scholarships to teams of women to allow them to work full-time on an open source project of their choice – aided by local coaches and guided by the project maintainer (or a core contributor). The scholarships are funded through the support of the community as well as our sponsors, via a crowdfunding campaign.

Local vs. Global
We all cherish our local community and understand how strong of a support network it can be, especially for newcomers. The Rails Girls chapters worldwide emphasize that need: most coaches and organisers are local, and many alums go on to create their own study groups, or become coaches or organisers themselves. RGSoC also relies strongly on a global network of user groups — both Rails Girls chapters and similar organisations such as PyLadies or DjangoGirls.

Thanks to our connections with these different groups, we are able to reach people in remote or unlikely locations, and build the most diverse group of applicants possible. This is very important to us. Since the beginning, the program has provided the opportunity to bring together women with different experiences, backgrounds, locales and age groups to come together and be part of the same global initiative.

Our Structure
Last year, we received over 90 team applications. When applying, each two-person team chooses from a list of pre-selected projects. These projects are maintained by people we either personally know, or who have reached out to us prior to the application period. We look for projects with patient, open-minded contributors who are active in their community, and projects that provide a lot of learning opportunities for applicants.

Project maintainers (also called mentors) are in touch with students in order to adapt the roadmap throughout the summer to the students' needs and check up on their progress. On a daily basis, students spend the majority of their time with coaches. The coaches help, support, and teach the students throughout the summer. Each team is also appointed a supervisor, who supports students on the organisational side of things. They are the glue that keeps the whole team together, and a way for the core RGSoC team to keep track of how every team is doing.

Our Stats
Our program started in 2013 with 18 teams, 10 of which were sponsored and 8 of which were volunteer teams. The following year, 16 teams participated with 10 sponsored spots. The real breakthrough came in 2015 when we were able to fund 16 sponsored teams, a substantial increase from the previous years. Not only did this enable us to have more impact — with a potential 12 more women entering the tech world and STEM workforce than the previous years — but it also shows the community’s trust in the program.

In 2016, the Ruby community awarded us with a Ruby Hero Award, and we managed to collect enough money to sponsor 16 teams from five continents with another 4 teams joining as volunteers. This year was also the first time we had teams based in Uganda, Egypt, Singapore and the Czech Republic.
Our stats from 2016 (Image: Laura Gaetano/RGSoC)In 2015, we contacted our alums from 2013 and 2014 to find out what they were doing after the program. The responses were impressive: out of 64 graduates, over 90% are now currently working in the tech field. A fair number of graduates have even founded their own startup. Not only that some of these women have found their calling, but we might have made a small difference in the community of open source, and are on the right track to really shake things up.

Where do we go from here
On the first of July last year, we kicked off our program with over 130 people participating — including coaches, supervisors, designers, helpdesk coaches and project mentors. We were incredibly excited to have 20 teams in 16 cities and 11 different countries, spanning time zones, from UTC+10 to UTC-7.
Our 2016 sponsored and volunteer teams! (Image: Ana Sofia Pinho/RGSoC)We’ve seen in the past just how much of an impact we’ve had in our participants’ lives, and are hoping that this trend will continue to rise. We hope that some of our previous editions' teams graduated with the skills and confidence to become NASA engineers, web developers, or anything else they want to be. Hopefully someday they will become a young woman’s role model, and realise the important role they served in changing the future of engineering and of open source software.

By Laura Gaetano, Organizer of Rails Girls Summer of Code
Categories: Open Source

Projects of the Week, January 2, 2017

SourceForge.net: Front page news - Mon, 01/02/2017 - 23:51

Here are the featured projects for the week, which appear on the front page of SourceForge.net:

MediaPortal

MediaPortal turns your PC into a very advanced MediaCenter / HTPC. It allows you to listen to your favorite music & radio, watch and store your videos and DVDs, view, schedule and record live TV as a digital video recorder and much much more.
[ Download MediaPortal ]


Sky Chart / Cartes du Ciel

SkyChart is a software to draw chart of the night sky for the amateur astronomer from a bunch of stars and nebulae catalogs. See main web page for full download. This software is part of a full suite for astronomical observation: https://sourceforge.net/projects/ccdciel/ https://sourceforge.net/projects/indistarter/ https://sourceforge.net/projects/eqmodgui/ Requirement: https://sourceforge.net/projects/libpasastro/ See also: https://sourceforge.net/projects/indi/
[ Download Sky Chart / Cartes du Ciel ]


Alt-F

Alt-F provides a free alternative firmware for the DLINK DNS-320/320L/321/323/325/327L. Alt-F has Samba and NFS; supports ext2/3/4, VFAT, NTFS and ISO9660 filesystems; RAID 0, 1, 5 (with external USB disk) and JBOD; supports 2/3/4TB disks; rsync, ftp, sftp, ftps, ssh, lpd, DNS and DHCP servers, DDNS, fan and leds control, clean power up and down… and more. Alt-F also has a set of comprehensive administering web pages, you don’t need to use the command line to configure it. Besides the built-in software, Alt-F also supports additional packages on disk, including ffp packages, that you can install, update and uninstall using the administering web pages Alt-F is still beta and is being developed and tested on a DNS-323-rev-A1/B1, a DNS325-rev-A1, a DNS-320L-rev-A1 and on a DNS-327L-rev-A1 hardware boards. Other models and boards are said to work. Support Forum: http://groups.google.com/group/alt-f Homepage: http://sites.google.com/site/altfirmware
[ Download Alt-F ]


BluestarLinux

Bluestar Linux is an Arch Linux-based distribution, built with an understanding that people want and need a solid Operating System that provides a breadth of functionality and ease of use without sacrificing aesthetics. Bluestar is offered in three edtions – desktop, deskpro and developer – each tailored to address the needs of a variety of Linux users. Bluestar can be installed permanently as a robust and fully configurable operating system on a laptop or desktop system, or it can be run effectively as a live installer and supports the addition of persistent storage for those who choose not to perform a permanent installation. A Bluestar Linux software respository is also maintained in order to provide additional tools and applications when needed or requested. Bluestar provides the following features: Up-to-date Kernel Wide Variety of Applications – Always Current Versions Full Development / Desktop / Multimedia Environment
[ Download BluestarLinux ]


VICE

VICE is an emulator collection which emulates the C64, the C64-DTV, the C128, the VIC20, practically all PET models, the PLUS4 and the CBM-II (aka C610). It runs on Unix, MS-DOS, Win32, OS/2, Acorn RISC OS, BeOS, QNX 6.x, Amiga, GP2X or Mac OS X machines.
[ Download VICE ]


OpenFOAM+

[ Download OpenFOAM+ ]


SWIG

SWIG is a software development tool that connects programs written in C and C++ with a variety of high-level programming languages. SWIG is used with different types of target languages including common scripting languages such as Javascript, Perl, PHP, Python, Tcl and Ruby. The list of supported languages also includes non-scripting languages such as C#, Common Lisp (CLISP, Allegro CL, CFFI, UFFI), D, Go language, Java, Lua, Modula-3, OCAML, Octave, R and Scilab. Also several interpreted and compiled Scheme implementations (Guile, MzScheme/Racket, Chicken) are supported. SWIG is most commonly used to create high-level interpreted or compiled programming environments, user interfaces, and as a tool for testing and prototyping C/C++ software. SWIG is typically used to parse C/C++ interfaces and generate the ‘glue code’ required for the above target languages to call into the C/C++ code. SWIG can also export its parse tree in the form of XML and Lisp s-expressions.
[ Download SWIG ]


thumbapps

We believe that free/open source software is enough, we don’t need pirated softwares on Windows. But most of these aren’t portables, or provided by PortableApps.com due to .NET dependencies, 64-bit etc. So we provide what’s missing here. Software publisher who wishes their portablized software taken down, can tip us through thumbapps.org or versapps@gmail.com. We promise to take it down without questions, but please be patient—we might not be able to respond promptly, but we eventually *will* …thanks for your patience, and sorry for being such a #naughty uploader

Categories: Open Source

Survey: Is NetBeans IDE 8.2 Ready for Release?

NetBeans Highlights - Mon, 01/02/2017 - 21:16
The release candidate of NetBeans IDE 8.2 is available, with many bug fixes. Once you have downloaded and used NetBeans IDE 8.2 RC, we would like to know what you think about it. Take the NetBeans IDE 8.2 Community Acceptance Survey and tell us about your experience! The survey will be opened until September 28th. Thank you in advance for participating in the survey! Jiri Kovalsky NetBeans Community Manager
Categories: Java, Open Source

January 2017, “Community Choice” Project of the Month – Bodhi Linux

SourceForge.net: Front page news - Sun, 01/01/2017 - 06:25

For our January “Community Choice” Project of the Month, the community elected Bodhi Linux, a minimalist, enlightened Linux distribution. Project author Jeff Hoogland shared his thoughts about the project’s history, purpose, and direction.

SourceForge (SF): What made you start this project?
Jeff Hoogland (JH): When I was in college I started using the Enlightenment Desktop on all of my Linux computers. At the time there was no easy way to install Linux distributions that featured this desktop as their primary interface. In fact, many did not even have an up to date version of the desktop in their repositories.

This led to me regularly building E from source on my 4~ different computers I had at the time. Always looking to do things in an optimal manner I started creating my own packaged sets for the desktop and figured I might as well take the short bit of extra time required to spin up a live CD with said packages installed / configured nicely.

SF: Has the original vision been achieved?
JH: I think we accomplished our goal quite well. We aim to provide a fast / sleek user interface on top of the powerful and flexible Ubuntu base and that is exactly what we provide.

SF: Who can benefit the most from your project?
JH: Unlike many Linux distributions we are not targeting novice users with Bodhi Linux. People who are looking for an operating system that will get the most out of their system resources will enjoy using Bodhi. From systems that need something slim, all the way up to modern gaming systems Bodhi flies on computers of all speeds. Just because your computer has 16gigs of RAM doesn’t mean you want your operating system using a large portion of it. The less resources your interface occupies, the more resources your applications you care about have access to.

SF: What core need does Bodhi Linux fulfill?
JH: Bodhi fills a nice middle ground between Linux distributions like Ubuntu (that come with a bulky desktop and lots of pre-installed applications) and something like Arch Linux that starts you with just a command prompt. We are just about as minimal as a fully-functional operating system can be without requiring use of a command prompt.

SF: What’s the best way to get the most out of using Bodhi Linux?
JH: Using it as your operating system of course! And tweaking it to your heart’s content with all of our themes and extra modules.

SF: What has your project team done to help build and nurture your community?
JH: Responding to feedback in a timely manner is ideal for building a community. I am very active in our user forums. Even when I do not have an answer to a question I make sure to try and point users in the right direction to find proper help with their issue.

SF: Have you all found that more frequent releases helps build up your community of users?
JH: While more releases are good for exposure to your project, I do think “updates for the sake of updating” that many projects do today is silly. With Bodhi our version numbers have meaning – whenever our first version number increases you know there is an entire base change for the operating system.

SF: What was the first big thing that happened for your project?
JH: Getting recognition from the site DistroWatch jumped our traffic by a good deal. It’s the site many people use to search for Linux distributions based on different parameters.

SF: What helped make that happen?
JH: They list distributions once they have proven they are here to stay and are not just a flash in the pan. Having regular relevant updates and releases for several months got us this recognition.

SF: How has SourceForge and its tools helped your project reach that success?
JH: SourceForge provides something for free that most places do not – bandwidth. Our operating system is smaller than most, but our five release discs are at least 600MB each. Multiply this by the over 7000 downloads we see per week and you are looking at over 15 TB of bandwidth which SourceForge provides us per month.

SourceForge also does a good job of making the data I provide above readily available to me as a project owner.

SF: What is the next big thing for Bodhi Linux?
JH: The next major change we have planned for Bodhi is a rewrite of our desktop’s settings panel.

SF: How long do you think that will take?
JH: Since Bodhi is powered by volunteers our timelines are never firm. All of our code is written on a “as time permits” basis. Ideally our new settings panel will be ready for inclusion in Bodhi by default by the end of 2017.

SF: Do you have the resources you need to make that happen?
JH: Time is our only bottleneck. We have a team of dedicated folks though who are more than capable of getting the work done.

SF: If you had to do it over again, what would you do differently for Bodhi Linux?
JH: I would use consistent naming schemes from the start for our repositories. We bounced between “main” and “stable” and “testing” and “unstable” for various things. With our 4.0.0 release we standardized to “b4main” and “b4testing” which will then change to “b5main” and “b5testing” with our 5.0.0 release in 2018.

SF: Is there anything else we should know?
JH: Bodhi is a Live CD! This means you can load it up on a CD or a USB drive and give it a try on your computer without changing the contents of your hard drive. Give it a go and see how fast it is for yourself.

[ Download Bodhi Linux ]

Categories: Open Source

Top 10 Security Best Practices

DevX: Open Source Articles - Fri, 12/30/2016 - 22:37
Security is hard. It takes dedicated attention, knowledge and meticulous execution. It is also an ongoing process. It's important to educate stakeholders and clarify the state of security, the risks and mitigations. You need to be vigilant and on your toes.
Categories: Open Source

eMoflon

Date Created: Fri, 2016-12-30 08:43Date Updated: Fri, 2017-03-24 16:15Submitted by: Roland Kluge

eMoflon is a tool for building tools. It allows you to model software systems using a visual or a textual syntax, afterwards generating EMF-compliant Java code from your model.

Categories: Open Source

7 New Year’s Resolution Ideas for Open Source Project Developers

SourceForge.net: Front page news - Fri, 12/30/2016 - 06:16

It seems like only yesterday that 2016 begun and we were just about to see great changes happening with SourceForge. Now we’re at the end of it, readying ourselves for yet another year.

As fond as we are of the year that was, now is not just a time for remembering “Auld Lang Syne”, but also a time to prepare for what comes next. For open source project developers that means not only reflecting upon decisions and actions made, but also coming up with new resolutions that will define the future of open source projects.

If you’re currently handling an open source project and unsure of what these resolutions should be, here are a few suggestions for you:

  1. Mentor more. Investing in your team is investing in your project. When you put in the time and resources to help your team members become well-trained and experienced, you will no doubt see the positive effects on your project. Apart from mentoring your team members, encourage other, more experienced team members to be mentors as well. Create avenues for mentorship like meetings and lunches where new and interested developers can mingle with more experienced ones and learn from them.
  2. Continue your education. Just as with your team, investing in your own skills and knowledge is also investing in your project. Software development is continually changing, with new languages, frameworks and technologies emerging every year. Make sure you keep up with these changes by enrolling in online classes, or simply joining meetups. The more skills and knowledge you acquire, the more you can apply to the development of your project.
  3. Develop and refine your project metrics. These figures can show you what progress looks like for your project, and where to focus in order to better achieve your goals.
  4. Improve your documentation. Quality documentation is where all great contributions begin. This coming year, you could resolve to make yours more user-friendly and informative, and consequently encourage more people to contribute to the project.
  5. Find better ways to reach out to contributors. If you haven’t had much luck getting new contributors this year, then it may be high time to find new ways of reaching out to them in the coming year. Perhaps you need to be more vocal about needing help, and identify the specific areas where people can easily start making contributions. Or perhaps you need to vary your mediums of communication. Expressing your needs via social media or on a newsletter might just do the trick.
  6. Collect feedback- not only from users but from previous contributors as well. Find out why they stopped contributing, and if there are things you can do to make them eager to contribute again.
  7. Take a break. Perhaps you’ve been working too hard this year. If so, resolve to take some breaks in the coming year. Taking breaks can help you see the bigger picture, and spot important aspects of project development you may have missed. It also helps you to recharge. During these breaks you could choose to contribute to other projects, and by so doing learn something new and broaden your horizons. This can also help you to refocus and introduce you to a much needed change of pace.
Categories: Open Source

Dandelion

Date Created: Thu, 2016-12-29 16:05Date Updated: Tue, 2017-01-03 10:43Submitted by: Michael Bohn

Dandelion - Eclipse Lisp Plugin

A Eclipse plugin for Common Lisp development. Integrates various Common Lisp runtimes as plugins.
It is possible to integrate an arbitrary Lisp environment via the Preference settings in Eclipse.

Categories: Open Source

Projects of the Week, December 26, 2016

SourceForge.net: Front page news - Mon, 12/26/2016 - 06:03

Here are the featured projects for the week, which appear on the front page of SourceForge.net:

winPenPack: Portable Software Collection

winPenPack is a project that aims at collecting the most frequently used and most popular open source applications made portable, so that they can be executed without installation from any USB Flash Drive or Hard Disk. The winPenPack suites offer a wide range of portable applications like office tools, internet tools, multimedia tools, development tools, security applications and other frequently used utilities. Everything you need, completely free, open source and portable!
[ Download winPenPack: Portable Software Collection ]


strace

strace is a diagnostic, debugging and instructional userspace tracer for Linux. It is used to monitor interactions between userspace processes and the Linux kernel, which include system calls, signal deliveries, and changes of process state. The operation of strace is made possible by the kernel feature known as ptrace.
[ Download strace ]


128px-brackets_icon-svgBrackets

Brackets is a free, modern open-source text editor made especially for Web Development. Written in HTML, CSS, and JavaScript with focused visual tools and preprocessor support, Brackets makes it easy for web designers and front-end developers to design in the browser. Its blend of visual tools ensures you get just the right amount of help when you want it without disrupting your creative process. It’s the better, easier and more enjoyable way of writing code.
[ Download Brackets ]


Money Manager Ex

Money Manager Ex (mmex) is an easy to use, money management application. It is a personal finance manager. It can be used to track your net worth, income vs expenses etc. It runs on Windows, Linux and Mac OSX.
[ Download Money Manager Ex ]


JMRI Model Railroad Interface

Java interfaces and sample implementations for controlling a model railroad layout from a personal computer. JMRI is intended as a jumping-off point for hobbyists to build their own layout controls. Includes the DecoderPro and PanelPro applications.
[ Download JMRI Model Railroad Interface ]


Subversion for Windows

Win32 build of Subversion. These binaries are built using Visual C++ 6.0 Should work on all flavours of Windows from Win2000 to Win8 and 2008 Server including server variants (not all tested). (1.7.x does not work on NT4 due to APR using new functions). Modules for Apache 2.2.x and 2.4.x (1.7.6 and up) is included. Language bindings are NOT tested. Source code is found at the Apache Subversion site at http://subversion.apache.org/ Code in this project is just a “Build script” and patches for VC6
[ Download Subversion for Windows ]


DVDStyler

DVDStyler is a cross-platform free DVD authoring application that makes possible for video enthusiasts to create professional-looking DVDs. DVDStyler provides over 20 DVD menu templates, allowing you to create your own menu designs and photo slideshows. After you select your DVD label name, video quality, video format, aspect ratio, and audio format, you can select a template to add video materials to. DVDStyler’s interface supports drag-and-drop so you can add project buttons and movies around with ease. Some basic video editing operations such as trimming and cropping are also available.
[ Download DVDStyler ]


Emgu CV

Emgu CV is a cross platform .Net wrapper to the OpenCV image processing library. Allowing OpenCV functions to be called from .NET compatible languages such as C#, VB, VC++, IronPython etc. The wrapper can be compiled in Mono and run on Windows, Linux, Mac OS X, iPhone, iPad and Android devices.
[ Download Emgu CV ]


FreeRTOS Real Time Kernel (RTOS)

Developed in partnership with the world’s leading chip companies over a 12 year period, FreeRTOS is the market leading real time operating system (or RTOS) in its class, and the de-facto standard solution for microcontrollers and small microprocessors. With millions of deployments in all imaginable market sectors (from toys to aircraft), FreeRTOS is trusted because it is professionally developed, strictly quality controlled, robust, supported, free to use in commercial products without a requirement to expose proprietary source code, and has no IP infringement risk. Pre-configured buildable applications that work “out of the box” are provided for each of the 35 processor architectures 18 tool chains that are officially supported. Training resources include RTOS tutorial books, and instructor led classes (both online and onsite). ARM Cortex (Cortex-M0, Cortex-M0+, Cortex-M3, Cortex-M4, Cortex-M7, Cortex-A9, Cortex-A5), Renesas, TI, Freescale, 8-bit, 16-bit, 32-bit, etc.
[ Download FreeRTOS Real Time Kernel (RTOS) ]

Categories: Open Source

Support for PostgreSQL 9.5 and 9.6 in dbForge Data Compare for PostgreSQL

PostgreSQL News - Mon, 12/26/2016 - 01:00

Devart has released a new version of dbForge Data Compare for PostgreSQL – a powerful and easy to use tool for table data comparison and synchronization.

Devart, a Czech software provider of database connectivity solutions and tools for database management and development, announced the release of dbForge Data Compare for PostgreSQL that comes with support for PostgreSQL 9.5, 9.6, redesigned Comparison Document, and with the new Document Categories feature.

Data Compare for PostgreSQL has the following new features and improvements:

  • Support for PostgreSQL 9.5, 9.6
  • Comparison document has been completely redesigned
  • New JSON View and redesigned XML view in Data Editor and Viewer window
  • Ability to assign categories for documents from different connections
  • New installation wizard and redesigned skins
  • New easy to use trial product activation

dbForge Data Compare for PostgreSQL is a Postgre Data Diff and Sync tool that allows users to review all the differences in tables being compared and execute an automatically generated script to remove these differences.

For more information about dbForge Data Compare for PostgreSQL, please visit https://www.devart.com/dbforge/postgresql/datacompare/.

About Devart

Devart is one of the leading developers of database tools and administration software, ALM solutions, data providers for various database servers, data integration and backup solutions. The company also implements Web and Mobile development projects.

Learn more about Devart at https://www.devart.com.

Categories: Database, Open Source

Taking the pulse of Google Code-in 2016

Google Open Source Blog - Fri, 12/23/2016 - 18:00
GCI official horizontal_1372x448dp.png
Today is the official midpoint of this year’s Google Code-in contest and we are delighted to announce this is our most popular year ever! 930 teenagers from 60 countries have completed 3,503 tasks with 17 open source organizations. The number of students successfully completing tasks has almost met the total number of students from the 2015 contest already.

Tasks that the students have completed include:
  • writing test suites
  • improving mobile UI 
  • writing documentation and creating videos to help new users 
  • working on internationalization efforts
  • fixing and finding bugs in the organization's’ software 
Participants from all over the world
In total, over 2,800 students from 87 countries have registered for the contest and we look forward to seeing great work from these (and more!) students over the next few weeks. 2016 has also seen a huge increase in student participation in places such as Indonesia, Vietnam and the Philippines.

Google Code-in participants by country
Please welcome two new countries to the GCI family: Mauritius and Moldova! Mauritius made a very strong debut to the contest and currently has 13 registered students who have completed 31 tasks.
The top five countries with the most completed tasks are:
  1. India: 982
  2. United States: 801
  3. Singapore: 202
  4. Vietnam: 119
  5. Canada: 117
Students, there is still plenty of time to get started with Google Code-in. New tasks are being added daily to the contest site — there are over 1,500 tasks available for students to choose from right now! If you don’t see something that interests you today, check back again every couple of days for new tasks.

The last day to register for the contest and claim a task is Friday, January 13, 2017 with all work being due on Monday, January 16, 2017 at 9:00 am PT.

Good luck to all of the students participating this year in Google Code-in!

By Stephanie Taylor, Google Code-in Program Manager

All numbers reported as of 8:00 PM Pacific Time, December 22, 2016.
Categories: Open Source

“Community Choice” Project of the Month Vote – February 2017

SourceForge.net: Front page news - Fri, 12/23/2016 - 02:22

The vote for February 2017 Community Choice SourceForge Project of the Month is now available, and will run until January 15, 2017 12:00 UTC.


Maxima — GPL CAS based on DOE-MACSYMA

Maxima is a computer algebra system comparable to commercial systems like Mathematica and Maple. It emphasizes symbolic mathematical computation: algebra, trigonometry, calculus, and much more. For example, Maxima solves x^2-r*x-s^2-r*s=0 giving the symbolic results [x=r+s, x=-s]. Maxima can calculate with exact integers and fractions, native floating-point and high-precision big floats. Maxima has user-friendly front-ends, an on-line manual, plotting commands, and numerical libraries. Users can write programs in its native programming language, and many have contributed useful packages in a variety of areas over the decades. Maxima is GPL-licensed and largely written in Common Lisp. Executables can be downloaded for Windows, Mac, Linux, and Android; source code is also available. An active community maintains and extends the system. Maxima is widely used: annual direct downloads exceed 300,000. Many other users receive it through secondary distribution.
[ Download Maxima — GPL CAS based on DOE-MACSYMA ]


fre:ac – free audio converter

fre:ac is a free audio converter and CD ripper for various formats and encoders. It features MP3, MP4/M4A, WMA, Ogg Vorbis, FLAC, AAC, and Bonk format support, integrates freedb/CDDB, CDText and ID3v2 tagging and is available in several languages.
[ Download fre:ac – free audio converter ]


winPenPack: Portable Software Collection

winPenPack is a project that aims at collecting the most frequently used and most popular open source applications made portable, so that they can be executed without installation from any USB Flash Drive or Hard Disk. The winPenPack suites offer a wide range of portable applications like office tools, internet tools, multimedia tools, development tools, security applications and other frequently used utilities. Everything you need, completely free, open source and portable!
[ Download winPenPack: Portable Software Collection ]


JasperReports Library

JasperReports Library, the world’s most popular open source business intelligence and reporting engine and JasperReports Server, the most popular open source interactive report server built-on JasperReports Library
[ Download JasperReports Library ]


net-snmp

Net-SNMP provides tools and libraries relating to the Simple Network Management Protocol including: An extensible agent, an SNMP library, tools to request or set information from SNMP agents, tools to generate and handle SNMP traps, etc.
[ Download net-snmp ]


Manjaro Community Torrents

This project is for download the Manjaro Officials and Community releases using a bittorrent client (console or graphical)
[ Download Manjaro Community Torrents ]


digiCamControl

digiCamControl is an free and open source software. This allows you to save time by transferring images directly from your camera to your computer as you take each shot and allow to control camera shooting parameters.
[ Download digiCamControl ]


gretl

gretl is a cross-platform software package for econometric analysis, written in the C programming language.
[ Download gretl ]


Linux Diagnostic Tools

Project’s goal is to create better tools for diagnosing Linux systems. Diagnostics include first failure data capture, error log analysis, preventative testing, and system inventory gathering.
[ Download Linux Diagnostic Tools ]

Categories: Open Source

Google Summer of Code 2016 wrap-up: Public Lab

Google Open Source Blog - Wed, 12/21/2016 - 18:00
This post is part of our series of guest posts from students, mentors and organization administrators who participated in Google Summer of Code 2016.


How we made this our best Google Summer of Code everThis was our fourth year doing Google Summer of Code (GSoC), and it was our best year ever by a wide margin! We had five hard-working students who contributed over 17,000 new lines of (very useful) code to our high-priority projects.

Students voluntarily started coding early and hit the ground running, with full development environments and a working knowledge of GitHub Flow-style pull request process. They communicated with one another and provided peer support. They wrote tests. Hundreds of them! They blogged about their work as they went, and chatted with other community members about how to design features.

All of that was amazing, and it was made better by the fact that we were accepting pull requests with new code twice weekly. Tuesdays and Fridays, I went through new submissions, provided feedback, and pulled new code into our master branch, usually publishing it to our production site once a week.

I don't know how other projects do things, but this was very new for us, and it's revolutionized how we work together. In past years, students would work on their forks, slowly building up features. Then in a mad dash at the end, we’d try to merge them into trunk, with lots of conflicts and many hours (weeks!) of work on the part of project maintainers.

Screenshot_2016-08-26_at_11.44.16_AM.pngWhat made this year so good?

Many things aligned to make this summer great, and basically none of them are our ideas. I'm sure plenty of you are cringing at how we used to do things, but I also don't think that it's that unusual for projects not "born" in the fast-paced world of modern code collaboration.

We used ideas and learned from Nicolas Bevacqua, author of JavaScript Application Design and of the woofmark and horsey libraries which I've contributed to. We've also learned a great deal from the Hoodie community, particularly Gregor Martynus, who we ran into at a BostonJS meetup. Lastly, we learned from SpinachCon, organized by Shauna Gordon McKeon and Deb Nicholson, where people refine their install process by actually going through the process while sitting next to each other.

Broadly, our strategies were:

  • Good documentation for newcomers (duh)
  • Short and sweet install process that you've tried yourself (thanks, SpinachCon!)
  • Predictable, regular merge schedule
  • Thorough test suite, and requiring tests with each pull request
  • Modularity, insisting that projects be broken into small, independently testable parts and merged as they’re written

Installation and pull requests

Most of the above sound kind of obvious or trivial, but we saw a lot of changes when we put it all together. Having a really fast install process, and guidance on getting it running in a completely consistent environment like the virtualized Cloud9 service, meant that many students were able to get the code running the same day they found the project. We aimed for an install time of 15 minutes max, and supplied a video of this for one of our codebases.

We also asked students to make a small change (even just add a space to a file) and walk through the GitHub Flow pull request (PR) submission process. We had clear step-by-step guidance for this, and we took it as a good sign when students were able to read through it and do this.

Importantly, we really tried to make each step welcoming, not demanding or dismissive, of folks who weren’t familiar with this process. This ultimately meant that all five students already knew the PR process when they began coding.

Twice-weekly merge schedule

We were concerned that, in past years, students only tried merging a few times and typically towards the end of the summer. This meant really big conflicts (with each other, often) and frustration.

This year we decided that, even though we’re a tiny organization with just one staff coder, we’d try merging on Tuesday and Friday mornings, and we mostly succeeded. Any code that wasn’t clearly presented, commits squashed, passing tests, and submitting new tests, was reviewed and I left friendly comments and requests so it could be merged the following week.

At first I felt bad rejecting PRs, but we had such great students that they got used to the strictness. They got really good at separating out features, demonstrating their features through clear tests, and some began submitting more than two PRs per week - always rebasing on top of the latest master to ensure a linear commit history. Sweet!

Wrap-up and next steps

The last thing we did was to ask each student, essentially as their documentation, to write a series of new issues which clearly described the problem and/or desired behavior, leave suggestions and links to specific lines of code or example code, and mark them with the special “help-wanted” tag which was so helpful to them when they first started out. We asked each to also make one extra-welcoming “first-timers-only” issue which walks a new contributor through every step of making a commit and even provides suggested code to be inserted.

This final requirement was key. While I personally made each of the initial set of “help-wanted” and “first-timers-only” issues before GSoC, now five students were offloading their unfinished to-dos as very readable and inviting issues for others. The effect was immediate, in part because these special tags are syndicated on some sites. Newcomers began picking them up within hours and our students were very helpful in guiding them through their first contributions to open source.

I want to thank everyone who made this past summer so great, from our champion mentors and community members, to our stellar students, to all our inspirations in this new process, to the dozen or so new contributors we’ve attracted since the end of August.

By Jeff Warren, Organization Administrator for PublicLab.org
Categories: Open Source

Dojo 1.12 released!

The Dojo Toolkit - Announcements - Wed, 12/21/2016 - 15:15

Happy Holidays from the Dojo team, we’re pleased to announce updated releases!

Dojo 1.12

Dojo 1.12 is now available for download or via npm or bower. Point releases are also available for versions 1.4 through 1.11!

Note that our documentation and tutorials for 1.10 remain valid for 1.11 and 1.12. 1.12 is mostly a release that fixes reported issues and adds minor feature enhancements to keep things improving while minimizing the risk of issues when upgrading. More details are available at the Dojo 1.12 release notes.

Dojo 2

We’re getting close to the much anticipated Dojo 2. We’ve reworked our approach many times to strike what we believe is the right balance of modern and efficient to use. You may track our progress at Dojo meta and the Dojo 2 roadmap. Our current goal (no guarantees, we want to get things right rather than meet an arbitrary deadline!) is to have a beta release in Q1 2017. Let us know if you would like to get involved!

In the past month, we’ve reworked the dojo/widgets approach to simplify state management with the virtual DOM, we’ve created an initial proof of concept for dgrid 2, implemented an ES8 Observables shim to reduce the dependency size for reactive observability, made significant strides on stores and i18n for Dojo 2, and much more.

Thanks!

Thanks for your contributions and support this year. We made many key improvements to giving Dojo 1.x while focusing the majority of our efforts on Dojo 2. We’re very excited to release Dojo 2 in 2017.

Categories: Open Source, RIA

Eclipse Converge | Program Announced

Eclipse News - Tue, 12/20/2016 - 20:30
Program Announced for Eclipse Converge 2017! Early-bird registration is open. Get $120 off the conference pass.
Categories: Open Source

Eclipse Newsletter | Ready, Set… 2017!

Eclipse News - Tue, 12/20/2016 - 11:50
2017. It's already here. Here are six great articles about some of the things you can expect to see in the new year!
Categories: Open Source

Projects of the Week, December 19, 2016

SourceForge.net: Front page news - Mon, 12/19/2016 - 06:04

Here are the featured projects for the week, which appear on the front page of SourceForge.net:

iDempiere

iDempiere = OSGi + ADempiere iDempiere Business Suite ERP/CRM/SCM done the community way. Focus is on the Community that includes Subject Matter Specialists, Implementors and End-Users. iDempiere is based on original Compiere/Adempiere plus a new architecture to use state-of-the-art technologies like OSGi, Buckminster, zk.
[ Download iDempiere ]


Linux Diagnostic Tools

Project’s goal is to create better tools for diagnosing Linux systems. Diagnostics include first failure data capture, error log analysis, preventative testing, and system inventory gathering.
[ Download Linux Diagnostic Tools ]


ScpToolkit

ScpToolkit is a free Windows Driver and XInput Wrapper for Sony DualShock 3/4 Controllers. Installation is fairly simple and straightforward, but does require a few things: Microsoft Windows Vista/7/8/8.1/10 x86 or amd64, Microsoft .NET Framework 4.5, Microsoft Visual C++ 2010 Redistributable Package, Microsoft Visual C++ 2013 Runtime, DirectX Runtime, Xbox 360 Controller driver (already integrated in Windows 8.x or greater), at least one supported Sony DualShock 3/4 controller and Administrator rights during driver setup.
[ Download ScpToolkit ]


Docutils: Documentation Utilities

Utilities for general- and special-purpose documentation. Includes reStructuredText, the easy to read, easy to use, what-you-see-is-what-you-get plaintext markup language.
[ Download Docutils: Documentation Utilities ]


net-snmp

Net-SNMP provides tools and libraries relating to the Simple Network Management Protocol including: An extensible agent, an SNMP library, tools to request or set information from SNMP agents, tools to generate and handle SNMP traps, etc.
[ Download net-snmp ]


PSeInt

PSeInt is a pseudo-code interpreter for Spanish-speaking programming students. Its main purpose is to be a tool for learning and understanding the basic concepts about programming and applying them with an easy understanding spanish pseudocode.
[ Download PSeInt ]


Maxima — GPL CAS based on DOE-MACSYMA

Maxima is a computer algebra system comparable to commercial systems like Mathematica and Maple. It emphasizes symbolic mathematical computation: algebra, trigonometry, calculus, and much more. For example, Maxima solves x^2-r*x-s^2-r*s=0 giving the symbolic results [x=r+s, x=-s]. Maxima can calculate with exact integers and fractions, native floating-point and high-precision big floats. Maxima has user-friendly front-ends, an on-line manual, plotting commands, and numerical libraries. Users can write programs in its native programming language, and many have contributed useful packages in a variety of areas over the decades. Maxima is GPL-licensed and largely written in Common Lisp. Executables can be downloaded for Windows, Mac, Linux, and Android; source code is also available. An active community maintains and extends the system. Maxima is widely used: annual direct downloads exceed 300,000. Many other users receive it through secondary distribution.
[ Download Maxima — GPL CAS based on DOE-MACSYMA ]


JasperReports Library

JasperReports Library, the world’s most popular open source business intelligence and reporting engine and JasperReports Server, the most popular open source interactive report server built-on JasperReports Library
[ Download JasperReports Library ]


Nagios Core

Nagios network monitoring software is a powerful, enterprise-class host, server, application, and network monitoring tools. Designed to be fast, flexible, and rock-solid stable. Nagios runs on *NIX hosts and can monitor Windows, Linux/Unix/BSD, Netware, and network devices.
[ Download Nagios Core ]

Categories: Open Source

FluentMark

Date Created: Sat, 2016-12-17 23:12Date Updated: Mon, 2017-01-30 00:33Certiv AnalyticsSubmitted by: Gerald Rosenberg

FluentMark
The full-featured Markdown editing environment for Eclipse.

Features

  • Multiple Markdown converters
  • Graphviz DOT diagram generator support built-in
    • renders as SVG images embedded in exported Web documents
    • renders as PDF images embedded in exported PDF documents
  • Real-time browser-based preview of the generated document
    • customizable stylesheet: multiple choices built-in or specify an external stylesheet
    • full code highlighting using highlight.js
  • Spell check with quick-assist correction processor
    • can be enabled independent of the platform spell checker
  • Smart editing behaviors
    • intelligent paragraph, list & blank line handling
Categories: Open Source

jelp

Date Created: Fri, 2016-12-16 15:07Date Updated: Sat, 2016-12-31 18:43Submitted by: Sairam Samavedam

What
jelp is an eclipse plugin to automatically create log statements in existing java code.

Dependency
Currently, jelp only works with slf4j logging framework.

More Info
https://thodelu.bitbucket.io/jelp

Categories: Open Source