Skip to content

Software Development News: .NET, Java, PHP, Ruby, Agile, Databases, SOA, JavaScript, Open Source

Methods & Tools

Subscribe to Methods & Tools
if you are not afraid to read more than one page to be a smarter software developer, software tester or project manager!

Open Source

Dojo Recap – Week Ending May 8, 2015

The Dojo Toolkit - Announcements - Tue, 05/12/2015 - 18:53
Another exciting week is underway in the Dojo camp! Dojo 1.x

In preparation for the 1.11 release planned for late Spring, we are landing high quality pull requests to fix various bugs and add enhancements to the dojo, dijit, and dojox packages.

Improvements this week Last week in Dojo 2

Initial Dojo 2 core repository is now public

In the intial core repository, you will find initial efforts in the repo for:

  • async
  • Promise
  • has
  • streams
  • WeakMap
  • decorators
  • lang
  • math
  • number
  • object observation
  • string shims
  • task queuing
Class Declaration

We've run into a small roadblock with our proposal for traits or mixins in TypeScript, so we are evaluating our options.

Style Guide

We have an updated and exhaustive Dojo 2 style guide available. Please follow these guidelines when contributing to Dojo 2.

This week’s Dojo 2 goals

Here are a few of this week's aspirations!

  • Verify all code conforms to Dojo 2 style guide
  • Further core development efforts including Encoding, Request, Events, Batch Processing, Date Features and streams (Transformers, Seekable Reader, Canned Streams, Iterable Interface)
  • Begin dom/html and history/routing development efforts
  • Refine proposals and readmes
Weekly IRC meeting

As usual, our weekly IRC meeting is on irc.freenode.net #dojo-meeting at 9am Pacific time on Tuesday.

Last week we discussed
  • General community and contributor feedback to the Dojo 2 roadmap
This week’s agenda
  • Discuss code in core repository
  • General community and contributor feedback to the Dojo 2 roadmap
Thanks!

Thanks to everyone for their valuable contributions this past week! Please let us know if you’d like to help out too!

Categories: Open Source, RIA

pgBadger 7.0 released !

PostgreSQL News - Tue, 05/12/2015 - 01:00

Paris, France - Mai 11th, 2014

DALIBO is proud to announce the release of pgBadger 7.0.

pgBadger is a PostgreSQL performance analyzer, built for speed with fully detailed reports based on your PostgreSQL log files.

New reports and support for explain.depesz.com

This major release adds more useful reports and features. One of the longest feature request have been also implemented, support to auto_explain extension. EXPLAIN plan will be added together with top slowest queries when available in log files. Thanks to the kind authorization of depesz, a link to automatically open directly the explain plan on http://explain.depesz.com/ is also available.

List of other new reports in this release:

  • Events (panic, fatal, error and warning) distribution per 5 minutes.
  • Per application details (total duration and times executed) for each query reported in Top Queries. The details are visible from a button called "App(s) involved".
  • Cumulated queries durations per user.

Three new reports to help identifying queries cancelled on secondaries clusters:

  • Number of cancelled queries (graph)
  • Queries generating the most cancellation (N)
  • Queries most cancelled.

For the complete list of changes, please checkout the release note on https://github.com/dalibo/pgbadger/blob/master/ChangeLog

Links & Credits

DALIBO would like to thank the developers who submitted patches and the users who reported bugs and feature requests, especially Mael Rimbault, Thomas Reiss, Korriliam, rlowe and Antti Koivisto.

pgBadger is an open project. Any contribution to build a better tool is welcome. You just have to send your ideas, features requests or patches using the GitHub tools or directly on our mailing list.

Links :

About pgBadger :

pgBagder is a new generation log analyzer for PostgreSQL, created by Gilles Darold (also author of ora2pg, the powerful migration tool). pgBadger is a fast and easy tool to analyze your SQL traffic and create HTML5 reports with dynamics graphs. pgBadger is the perfect tool to understand the behavior of your PostgreSQL servers and identify which SQL queries need to be optimized.

Docs, Download & Demo at http://dalibo.github.io/pgbadger/

About DALIBO :

DALIBO is the leading PostgreSQL company in France, providing support, trainings and consulting to its customers since 2005. The company contributes to the PostgreSQL community in various ways, including : code, articles, translations, free conferences and workshops

Check out DALIBO's open source projects at http://dalibo.github.io

Categories: Database, Open Source

Call for Papers - PostgreSQL Conference Europe 2015

PostgreSQL News - Tue, 05/12/2015 - 01:00

PostgreSQL Conference Europe 2015 will be held on October 27-30 in the Vienna Marriott Hotel, in Vienna, Austria. It will cover topics for PostgreSQL users, developers and contributors, as well as decision and policy makers. For more information about the conference, please see the website.

We are now accepting proposals for talks in English or German. If you are submitting a talk in German, please write a short summary of the abstract in English in the "submission notes" field.

Each session will last 45 minutes, and may be on any topic related to PostgreSQL. Suggested topic areas include:

  • Developing applications for PostgreSQL
  • Administering large scale PostgreSQL installations
  • Case studies and/or success stories of PostgreSQL deployments
  • PostgreSQL tools and utilities
  • PostgreSQL hacking
  • Community & user groups
  • Tuning the server
  • Migrating from other systems
  • Scaling/replication
  • Benchmarking & hardware
  • PostgreSQL related products

Of course, we're happy to receive proposals for talks on other PostgreSQL related topics as well.

We may also have a limited number of longer, 90-minute, slots available. Please indicate clearly in your submission if you wish to make a 90-minute talk.

Finally, there will be a session of five minute lightning talks. A separate call for proposals will be made for them further on.

The submission deadline is August 7th. Selected speakers will be notified before August 24th, 2015.

Please submit your proposals by going to http://2015.pgconf.eu/callforpapers/ and following the instructions there.

The proposals will be considered by committee who will produce a schedule to be published nearer the conference date.

All selected speakers will get free entry to the conference (excluding training sessions). We do not in general cover travel and accommodations for speakers, but may be able to do that in limited cases. If you require assistance with funding to be able to attend, please make a note of this in the submission notes field.

We look forward to hearing from you, and seeing you in Vienna in October!

Categories: Database, Open Source

Fast Open

Date Created: May 11, 2015 - 17:33Date Updated: May 12, 2015 - 16:47Submitted by: Lateef Alabi-Oki

FastOpen is the fastest way to open, or navigate to, files in Eclipse 4.

Just press ctrl+r to show the FastOpen window and press Enter to open, or navigate to, selected files. Since FastOpen ranks files
based on most recent access, you can use it to focus already open files very quickly. Or if you accidently close a file, just press ctrl+r then
press Enter to reopen it.

Features
  • Intelligently ranks files base on most recent access.
  • Optimized for keyboard and workflow efficiency.
  • Useful metadata information for distinguishing files.
  • Reopen closed files very quickly.
  • Focus already opened files very quickly.
  • Press ctrl+r to open FastOpen window.
  • Press DEL to close files from FastOpen window.
Website Donate Support Github Repository Requirement
  • You need Eclipse 4.4(Luna) or later to use this plugin.
Update Site Screenshot

Eclipse 4 FastOpen Screenshot

Categories: Open Source

Project of the Week, May 11, 2015

SourceForge.net: Front page news - Mon, 05/11/2015 - 06:08

Here are the featured projects for the week, which appear on the front page of SourceForge.net:



Robolinux

Robolinux is very pleased to make two announcements as of May 1st, 2015:
1) We released the new Robolinux V7.9.1, “Apex X12 Privacy & Security!” Invisible Internet project (I2P), plus many more upgrades!
2) We are introducing “The Robolinux Open Source Software Foundation”, which is a ground breaking game changer for Linux Desktop Users and Linux Desktop Software Developers.
[ Download Robolinux ]


XBian

XBian is a free, Open Source media center distribution for mini computers (currently Raspberry Pi, Solidrun’s CuBox-i/Hummingboard supported). Our slogan is “bleeding edge” as our main focus is delivering the fastest media center solution. We believe that everyone can help make XBian better.
[ Download XBian ]


Octave Forge

Octave-Forge is a central location for the collaborative development of packages for GNU Octave. The Octave-Forge packages expand Octave’s core functionality by providing field specific features via Octave’s package system. For example, image and signal processing, fuzzy logic, instrument control, and statistics packages are examples of individual Octave-Forge packages.
[ Download Octave Forge ]


NAS4Free

NAS4Free is an embedded Open Source Storage distribution and supports sharing across Windows, Apple, and UNIX-like systems. It includes ZFS, Software RAID (0,1,5), disk encryption, S.M.A.R.T / email reports etc. with following protocols: CIFS (samba), FTP, NFS, TFTP, AFP, RSYNC, Unison, iSCSI, UPnP, Bittorent (initiator and target), Bridge, CARP (Common Address Redundancy Protocol) and HAST (Highly Available Storage). All this can easy be setup by it’s highly configurable Web interface. NAS4Free can be installed on Compact Flash/USB/SSD media, Hard disk or booted of from a LiveCD with a usb stick.
[ Download NAS4Free ]



NamelessROM

NamelessRom is opportunity; an opportunity to have a voice to the development team of the after-market firmware that you run on your device. The main goal of NamelessRom is to provide quality development for android devices, phones, and tablets alike. NamelessRom developers are available nearly 24/7 and respond to bug reports and feature requests almost instantly. This availability will allow you, the end-user, to have direct input into exactly what features and functions are included on the firmware that YOU run.
[ Download NamelessROM ]



CaesarIA (openCaesar3)

CaesarIA is an open source remake of Caesar III game released by Impressions Games in 1998, it aims to expand the possibilities of the classical city-building simulators and to add new features showing the city life. Now the game work with Windows, Linux, Mac, Haiku and Android. The original Caesar3 game is needed to play openCaesar3.
[ Download CaesarIA (openCaesar3) ]


K-Meleon

K-Meleon is a fast and customizable web browser that can be used instead of Internet Explorer on Windows. Powered by the same Gecko engine as the Firefox and Mozilla browsers, K-Meleon provides users with a secure browsing experience.
[ Download K-Meleon ]



Smoothwall

Smoothwall is a best-of-breed Internet firewall/router, designed to run on commodity hardware and to provide an easy-to-use administration interface to those using it. Built using open source and free software, it’s distributed under the GNU Public License.
[ Download Smoothwall ]


Maxima — GPL CAS based on DOE-MACSYMA

Maxima is a computer algebra system comparable to commercial systems like Mathematica and Maple. It emphasizes symbolic mathematical computation: algebra, trigonometry, calculus, and much more. For example, Maxima solves x^2-r*x-s^2-r*s=0 giving the symbolic results [x=r+s, x=-s]. Maxima can calculate with exact integers and fractions, native floating-point and high-precision big floats. Maxima has user-friendly front-ends, an on-line manual, plotting commands, and numerical libraries. Users can write programs in its native programming language, and many have contributed useful packages in a variety of areas over the decades.
[ Download Maxima — GPL CAS based on DOE-MACSYMA ]

Categories: Open Source

Hybris Impex Editor

Date Created: May 10, 2015 - 06:20Date Updated: May 11, 2015 - 11:13Submitted by: el jaoujat youssef

Impex is a hybris specific language in top of SQL to import/export data the database.

Syntax highlighting.
Auto completion.
Data Definition update.
remote execution
Full customization from preferences.

Categories: Open Source

Google Code-in 2014 wrap up with KDE

Google Open Source Blog - Thu, 05/07/2015 - 17:00
The KDE community was one of the twelve mentoring organizations which took part in Google Code-in 2014, our open source coding contest for 13 to 17 year old students. Mentor and co-administrator Heena Mahour wrote in to tell us about the students’ accomplishments with KDE.

KDE is an international free software community. We’re best known for the Plasma Desktop which is the default for several Linux distributions, but we produce an entire integrated set of cross-platform applications designed to run on Linux, FreeBSD, Solaris, Windows, and OS X systems. We’re also an umbrella project for many standalone applications based on our technology.
The KDE community participated in Google Code-in (GCI) to inspire young contributors and offer them an opportunity to get involved with KDE and open source. We created 277 tasks for students to choose from, and 29 mentors volunteered to help the students with their work. Of the many projects that are part of KDE, the team behind the Marble virtual globe created the most tasks for us with 50. We also provided 65 different beginner tasks to help students without any experience take their first step as an open source contributor before moving on to more challenging tasks.
Tasks in GCI come in several categories. We offered 190 coding tasks, 26 for documentation and training, and 41 for quality assurance. It was a joy for us to see students working with the mentors and learning how to become part of an open source community. At the end of the contest, 240 tasks had been completed!
Like every organization taking part, we were able to select two students as Grand Prize Winners. From the students who completed the most tasks successfully, we considered the creativity, thoroughness, and quality of their work. Mikhail Ivchenko from Russia and Ilya Kowalewski from Ukraine were selected as our winners and will soon be visiting Google’s headquarters along with the other GCI winners.
We’re all grateful for the opportunity GCI gave us to work with these enthusiastic young students and get them involved with KDE. We hope to continue seeing their names in the future -- keep it up, everyone!

by Heena Mahour, KDE mentor and co-administrator
Categories: Open Source

SQL Development Tools

Date Created: May 6, 2015 - 22:35Date Updated: May 6, 2015 - 22:42Submitted by: Wayne Beaton [The Eclipse Foundation]

Tools for managing databases, and authoring and executing SQL.

Routines Editor Framework

The Routines Editor Framework is an extensible framework for editing database routines and SQL statements. Vendor-specific extensions enable specialized support for particular databases.

Routines Debugger Framework

The Routines Debugger Framework provides an extensible support base enabling debugging for various databases in a manner consistent with the existing Eclipse debug infrastructure.

SQL Query Builder

SQL Query Builder enables you to create, edit, or run SQL statements using the SQL Query Builder graphical interface, which provides access to your database schema and objects so that you can quickly create or edit SQL statements without actually typing any SQL code.

SQL Execution Plan Framework

The SQL Execution Plan Framework provides a means for capturing and presenting execution plans in a generic fashion, enabling customized support for specific SQL execution engines.

Categories: Open Source

EclipseCon France 2015 - Program and Keynote Announced

Eclipse News - Wed, 05/06/2015 - 15:46
We're pleased to announce the program and keynote for EclipseCon France 2015, planned for June 24-25 in Toulouse.
Categories: Open Source

Component-based JavaScript Development with React.js

DevX: Open Source Articles - Tue, 05/05/2015 - 17:18
React takes a different approach than your run of the mill JavaScript framework on several fronts. Learn more about the unique features.
Categories: Open Source

GSoC 2015 stats part 1: All about the countries

Google Open Source Blog - Tue, 05/05/2015 - 17:00
01_GSOC_header.jpg
As we gear up for the start of the 11th Google Summer of Code, we’ve been putting together some interesting numbers and stats for this year’s program.  Every year within minutes of the accepted students being announced, we are asked “how many students from my country were accepted?” and “how many students from my school were accepted?” We’ll be answering these kinds of questions with a few posts over the next few weeks, starting today.
Let’s start with our country-specific stats. Last year when we decided to list all of the countries with accepted students it was a huge hit, so why mess with success? The 73 countries represented by this year’s 1,051 GSoC accepted students are listed alphabetically below.
Argentina2
Kuwait1Armenia1
Lithuania1Australia4
Luxembourg2Austria8
Malaysia1Bangladesh1
Mexico5Belarus6
Moldavia2Belgium2
Morocco1Brazil15
Netherlands10Bulgaria2
New Zealand2Cameroon12
Nigeria1Canada23
Norway3Chile1
Pakistan2China49
Paraguay1Colombia2
Peru2Croatia4
Philippines2Czech Republic3
Poland33Denmark1
Portugal13Dominican Republic1
Romania19Ecuador1
Russian Federation38Egypt7
Singapore11Estonia1
Slovak Republic6Finland5
South Korea5France18
Spain30Germany50
Sri Lanka58Greece9
Sweden3Guatemala1
Switzerland5Honduras1
Taiwan2Hong Kong4
Tunisia2Hungary23
Turkey8India335
Uganda1Indonesia1
Ukraine8Ireland3
United Arab Emirates3Italy19
United Kingdom13Jamaica1
United States127Japan6
Uruguay1Kazakhstan1
Vietnam2Kenya4



We have two countries being represented by students for the first time this year: Kuwait and United Arab Emirates - welcome to the GSoC family! With these two additions, we now have 103 countries where students have been accepted into the GSoC program since 2005.
As you may have seen in recent posts, there are many students and mentors throughout Africa and all around the world working very hard to spread the word about GSoC to their communities. We are happy to announce that Cameroon quadrupled their number of accepted students in 2015 to 12!
In our upcoming posts, we will delve deeper into the stats by looking at the universities with the most accepted students, degrees sought by students, gender numbers, and mentor stats. If you have other questions that you’d like to ask, please leave a comment on this post and we will try to answer your question in an upcoming post.
By Stephanie Taylor, Open Source Programs
Categories: Open Source

Eclipse Foundation Announces Red Hat as a Strategic Member

Eclipse News - Tue, 05/05/2015 - 14:30
Company reaffirms its commitment to Eclipse open source tools and the new Eclipse Internet of Things open source community.
Categories: Open Source

Barman 1.4.1 released

PostgreSQL News - Tue, 05/05/2015 - 01:00

05 May 2015: 2ndQuadrant is proud to announce the release of version 1.4.1 of Barman, Backup and Recovery Manager for PostgreSQL.

This minor release fixes a few outstanding bugs and does not introduce any new features.

For a complete list of changes, see the "Release Notes" section below.

Links

Release notes

  • Fix for WAL archival stop working if first backup is EMPTY (Closes: #64)
  • Fix exception during error handling in Barman recovery (Closes: #65)
  • After a backup, limit cron activity to WAL archiving only (Closes: #62)
  • Improved robustness and error reporting of the "backup delete" command (Closes: #63)
  • Fix computation of WAL production ratio as reported in the "show-backup" command
  • Improved management of xlogb file, which is now correctly fsynced when updated. Also, the "rebuild-xlogdb" command now operates on a temporary new file, which overwrites the main one when finished.
  • Add unit tests for dateutil module compatibility
  • Modified Barman version following PEP 440 rules and added support of tests in Python 3.4

Download

About

Barman (Backup and Recovery Manager) is an open source administration tool for disaster recovery of PostgreSQL servers written in Python. It allows your organisation to perform remote backups of multiple servers in business critical environments and help DBAs during the recovery phase. Barman’s most requested features include backup catalogues, incremental backup, retention policies, remote backup and recovery, archiving and compression of WAL files and backups. Barman is distributed under GNU GPL 3.

Categories: Database, Open Source

Dojo Recap – Week Ending April 30, 2015

The Dojo Toolkit - Announcements - Mon, 05/04/2015 - 20:28
Another exciting week is underway in the Dojo camp! Dojo 1.x

In preparation for the 1.11 release planned for late Spring, we are landing high quality pull requests to fix various bugs and add enhancements to the dojo, dijit, and dojox packages.

Improvements this week Last week in Dojo 2

This week we have some exciting updates to share with you on the planning and development progress of Dojo 2!

First off, we updated the Dojo 2 Roadmap to reflect the changes that took place this week. These changes include:

  1. The collection of packages we were calling "Dojo 2 Core" has been renamed to "Dojo 2 Platform" to prevent any confusion with the core package.
  2. The package combination that we outlined in last week's blog post was completed this week and the package status section of the Roadmap reflects this new package structure.
Browser support decision

We made the decision support IE9 through the launch of Dojo 2. While there are undoubtedly some pain points with supporting IE9, we believe that the effort to support it is not substantially greater than IE11. We also wanted to ensure that Dojo 2 launched with a core that would be compatible with Intern, which needs to be able to test a wide range of modern browsers. If the effort to support IE9 becomes too great, we reserve the right to amend this decision!

In other Browser Support news, we also decided to support Android Browser 4.3+. We discovered that this is the cutoff point for Android market share and that it was the most logical point for Dojo 2 to begin support for Android versions.

As we stated last week, please note that while the platform packages will support a more conservative list of browsers, widgets and other features on top of the platform packages may choose to support only more modern browsers.

Dojo 2's current Browser Support is:
  • Firefox latest and recent versions
  • Chrome latest and recent versions (desktop and mobile)
  • Safari 7+ (desktop and mobile)
  • IE 9, 10, 11
  • Microsoft Edge
  • Android 4.3 and 4.4
TypeScript compiler improvements

We are conducting research this week on compiler improvements to determine the needs of the project and best approach. We will keep you apprised of our findings as we figure things out!

This week’s Dojo 2 goals

With many of the ops kinks worked out, we hope to begin making good progress on package development this week. Here are a few of this week's aspirations!

  • Make initial efforts on the Dojo 2 core package available via GitHub
  • Core development efforts including:
  • stream: Node stream adapter implemented and tests written along with Transformer unit tests
  • platform shims: String, Map, Set, and maybe WeakMap
  • Object copying, task queuing, property observation, and date handling
Weekly IRC meeting

As usual, our weekly IRC meeting is on irc.freenode.net #dojo-meeting at 9am Pacific time on Tuesday.

Last week we discussed
  • Core package consolidation: Discussion of included modules & approach
  • Dojo 2 Browser Support Decision: feedback received to make decision
  • General community and contributor feedback to the Dojo 2 roadmap
  • Any pressing issues with 1.x
This week’s agenda
  • General community and contributor feedback to the Dojo 2 roadmap
  • Any pressing issues with 1.x
Thanks!

Thanks to everyone for their valuable contributions this past week! Please let us know if you’d like to help out too!

Categories: Open Source, RIA

Project of the Week, May 4, 2015

SourceForge.net: Front page news - Mon, 05/04/2015 - 06:08

Here are the featured projects for the week, which appear on the front page of SourceForge.net:


gnuplot development

A famous scientific plotting package, features include 2D and 3D plotting, a huge number of output formats, interactive input or script-driven options, and a large set of scripted examples.
[ Download gnuplot development ]



NamelessROM

NamelessRom is opportunity; an opportunity to have a voice to the development team of the after-market firmware that you run on your device. The main goal of NamelessRom is to provide quality development
for android devices, phones, and tablets alike. NamelessRom developers are available nearly 24/7 and respond to bug reports and feature requests almost instantly. This availability will allow you, the end-user, to have direct input into exactly what features and functions are included on the firmware that YOU run.
[ Download NamelessROM ]


TYPO3

TYPO3 is an enterprise class Web CMS written in PHP/MySQL. It’s designed to be extended with custom written backend modules and frontend libraries for special functionality. It has very powerful integration of image manipulation.
[ Download TYPO3 ]


NAS4Free

NAS4Free is an embedded Open Source Storage distribution and supports sharing across Windows, Apple, and UNIX-like systems. It includes ZFS, Software RAID (0,1,5), disk encryption, S.M.A.R.T / email reports etc.
with following protocols: CIFS (samba), FTP, NFS, TFTP, AFP, RSYNC, Unison, iSCSI, UPnP, Bittorent (initiator and target), Bridge, CARP (Common Address Redundancy Protocol) and HAST (Highly Available Storage). All this can easy be setup by it’s highly configurable WEB interface. NAS4Free can be installed on Compact Flash/USB/SSD media, hard disk or booted of from a LiveCD with a USB stick.
[ Download NAS4Free ]


Maxima — GPL CAS based on DOE-MACSYMA

Maxima is a computer algebra system comparable to commercial systems like Mathematica and Maple. It emphasizes symbolic mathematical computation: algebra, trigonometry, calculus, and much more. For
example, Maxima solves x^2-r*x-s^2-r*s=0 giving the symbolic results [x=r+s, x=-s]. Maxima can calculate with exact integers and fractions, native floating-point and high-precision big floats. Maxima has user-friendly front-ends, an on-line manual, plotting commands, and numerical libraries. Users can write programs in its
native programming language, and many have contributed useful packages in a variety of areas over the decades. Maxima is GPL-licensed and largely written in Common Lisp. Executables can be downloaded for Windows, Mac, Linux, and Android; source code is also available. An active community maintains and extends the system. Maxima is widely used and annual direct downloads exceed 100,000. Many other users receive it through secondary distribution.
[ Download Maxima — GPL CAS based on DOE-MACSYMA ]


Battle for Wesnoth

The Battle for Wesnoth is a free, turn-based tactical strategy game with a high fantasy theme, featuring both single-player and online/hotseat multiplayer combat. Fight a desperate battle to reclaim the throne of Wesnoth, or take hand in any number of other adventures.
[ Download Battle for Wesnoth ]



dispcalGUI

A graphical user interface for the Argyll CMS display calibration utilities.
[ Download dispcalGUI ]



FlightGear – Flight Simulator

Founded in 1997, FlightGear is developed by a worldwide group of volunteers, brought together by a shared ambition to create the most realistic flight simulator possible that is free to use, modify and distribute. FlightGear is used all over the world by desktop flight simulator enthusiasts, for research in universities and for
interactive exhibits in museums. FlightGear features more than 400 aircraft, a worldwide scenery database, a multi-player environment, detailed sky modelling, a flexible and open aircraft modelling system, varied networking options, multiple display support, a powerful scripting language, and an open architecture. Best of all, being Open Source, the simulator is owned by the community and everyone is encouraged to contribute.
[ Download FlightGear – Flight Simulator ]



VoIP monitor

VoIPmonitor is Open Source network packet sniffer with commercial frontend for SIP SKINNY RTP and RTCP VoIP protocols running on Linux. VoIPmonitor is designed to analyze quality of VoIP call based on network parameters – delay variation and packet loss according to ITU-T G.107 E-model which predicts quality on MOS scale. Calls with all relevant statistics are saved to MySQL or ODBC database. Optionally each call can be saved to pcap file with either only SIP / SKINNY protocol or SIP/RTP/RTCP/T.38/udptl protocols. VoIPmonitor can also decode audio.
[ Download VoIP monitor ]

Categories: Open Source

cmake4eclipse

Date Created: May 1, 2015 - 12:21Date Updated: May 13, 2015 - 15:22Submitted by: Martin Weber

Let CMake generate the buildscripts for Eclipse.

This Eclipse plugin automatically generates buildscripts for the Eclipse CDT managed build system from CMake scripts.

Why cmake4eclipse?

Blindly invoked, CMake will generate makefiles (or other build scripts) inside the source tree, cluttering it with lots of files and directories that have to be fleed out from version control: This practice might be ok for simple hello-world-projects, but for larger projects, the CMake developers recommend You to set up a separate directory for building the source.

Annoyingly, these recommended out-of-source-builds impose some tedious tasks on Your co-workers who check out the code and just want to build it:

  1. leave eclipse workbench,
  2. manually fire up a command-line shell,
  3. manually create a directory for the out-of-source-build,
  4. manually change the CWD to that directory,
  5. manually invoke cmake, telling it to generate build scripts, which kind of build scripts you want and where source source files live,
  6. re-enter eclipse workbench, configure the checked out project to use the generated buildscripts.

Cmake4eclipse aims to address these tasks: Co-workers can simply check out the source and have all the tedious tasks automated.

Categories: Open Source

GlassFish Tools

Date Created: May 1, 2015 - 12:05Date Updated: June 16, 2015 - 13:46Submitted by: Konstantin Komissarchik

Tools for developing applications for GlassFish.

  • Integrates with Eclipse Web Tools.
  • Supports GlassFish 4.0 and 3.1.

These features are also part of Oracle Enterprise Pack for Eclipse (OEPE).

IMPORTANT: Please consult the following table regarding the minimum version of Java required to run GlassFish Tools.

  • Mars - Java 8
  • Luna - Java 8
  • Kepler - Java 7
  • Juno - Java 6

Even if the correct version of Java is installed, Eclipse may find an earlier version upon launch, if it exists somewhere else on the system. To verify the version of Java that Eclipse is using, go to Help -> About -> Installation Details -> Configuration.

If you find that Eclipse is using a wrong Java install, edit eclipse.ini file and add the following two lines to the start of the file:

-vm
[path-to-jre]

Categories: Open Source

May 2015, “Community Choice” Project of the Month – ConEmu

SourceForge.net: Front page news - Fri, 05/01/2015 - 06:08

For our May “Community Choice” Project of the Month, the community elected ConEmu, a Windows Console Emulator with Far Manager plugins. ConEmu’s main developer, Maximus, shared his thoughts about the project’s history, purpose, and direction.

SourceForge (SF): Tell me about the ConEmu project please.

Maximus: The goal of the ConEmu project is to bring to the Windows world a handy and reliable terminal application, in other words, a better console window to boost user productivity.

SF: What made you start this?

Maximus: The alternatives were either too bare, proprietary, or nearly abandoned. Anyway they did not fit my expectations or requirements so I forked the project.

SF: Has the original vision been achieved?

Maximus: I hope so. Of course there is much to do yet, but ConEmu can be used on daily basis and it can greatly improve the console experience.

SF: Who can benefit the most from your project?

Maximus: Anyone who uses command line daily; developers and administrators are the general target audience.

SF: What is the need for this Windows console emulator with Far Manager plugins?

Maximus: ConEmu was initially created as a Far Manager companion or a kind of graphical interface for the old school but oft-used two-panel, console file manager. It’s my favorite ‘shell’ actually. ConEmu gives to Far many “nifties” like visualizing Far editors and viewers with tabs, dragging files and folders, customizing panels with background images and more. Plugins do all the magic.

SF: What’s the best way to get the most out of using ConEmu?

Maximus: According to one user, ‘It seems like every time I think it would be nice if ConEmu did something, I’ll find that option if I search for it’. So, if you can’t find what you need, just go to the ConEmu website and check out the documentation. There are also many answers on StackOverflow.com and SuperUser.com too.

SF: What has your project team done to help build and nurture your community?

Maximus: We are trying to release reliable software and provide good support to our users by maintaining thorough documentation.

SF: Have you all found that more frequent releases help build up your community of users?

Maximus: Yes, why should a user have to wait weeks or months for a new release? We believe in good support, especially if something can be fixed or implemented in minutes and delivered to users ASAP.

SF: What was the first big thing that happened for your project?

Maximus: I think the blog-post of Scott Hanselman added much to ConEmu fame worldwide.

SF: What helped make that happen?

Maximus: At that moment ConEmu was already a neat and handy project with many practical features, so Scott noticed them and let thousands of his followers recognize this new terminal application.

SF: What was the net result for that event?

Maximus: A large augmentation in our download count! Seriously, ConEmu became much more notable and known.

SF: What is the next big thing for ConEmu?

Maximus: The project is mature enough but there are a lot of interesting suggestions waiting to be implemented and there is a RoadMap. However, if we take a moment to dream about good fortune, it would be nice to see ConEmu bundled with environments like Git or MinGW. That would be a real acknowledgement.

SF: How long do you think that will take?

Maximus: I can’t tell. We strive to make a great product but people don’t necessarily think that handy terminal is a necessity, even if they use the console environment daily. They still can’t imagine how ConEmu may improve their day-to-day productivity.

SF: What resources do you need to make that happen?

Maximus: That does not depend on ConEmu team alone, we are a live open source project available to anyone. But raising ConEmu’s popularity helps, like being the SourceForge project of the month!

SF: If you had it to do over again, what would you do differently for ConEmu?

Maximus: Well, I would start it much earlier.

SF: Why?

Maximus: With more years of development ConEmu would be more powerful now.

SF: Any reason you can’t do that now?

Maximus: There is no time machine unfortunately.

Categories: Open Source

May 2015, “Staff Pick” Project of the Month – Smoothwall

SourceForge.net: Front page news - Fri, 05/01/2015 - 06:08

For our May “Staff Pick” Project of the Month, we selected Smoothwall Express, a Linux distribution that turns a PC (or VM) into a firewall. The Smoothwall Express team shared their thoughts about the project’s history, purpose, and direction.

SourceForge (SF): Tell me about the Smoothwall Express project please.

Smoothwall Team: Smoothwall Express (Smoothwall) is a specialized Linux distribution that turns a spare PC (or VM) into a firewall. It features a caching Web proxy, VPN service, DHCP server, and other assorted network services. Smoothwall Express is a solid, secure firewall that is safely maintained and administered by people who are not IT experts, much less network security experts. The main goal is to be as easy to use as possible, so we don’t flood the user with features they’ll never use.

SF: What made you start this?

Smoothwall Team: Smoothwall started in 2000 when there were only a few similar projects around, these projects were extremely hard to use and nearly all of them required Linux command line knowledge. The goal of Smoothwall was to change that and present an easy to use Web interface. We also wanted the initial install and setup to be as quick and painless as possible.

SF: Has the original vision been achieved?

Smoothwall Team: I’d like to think yes. Tens of thousands of people around the world use Smoothwall to protect their personal networks and their home and business offices, and there are a number of corporations who use Smoothwall; a few of them visit the online forum to obtain setup and configuration assistance. As time has gone on, people want more from their firewall, but the core vision, ease of use and setup, has remained.

SF: Who can benefit the most from your project?

Smoothwall Team: Anyone who wants safe and secure Internet access and who needs an easy to manage firewall will benefit from Smoothwall.

SF: What is the need for this Internet firewall?

Smoothwall Team: Watch the computer/Internet news. There are far too many break-ins reported; each is associated with the loss of personal data entrusted to the entity storing it. And look at the reports of botnets: networks of computers that Internet miscreants have commandeered for their nefarious purposes. All of these thefts could have been avoided with proper network security in place, with a proper firewall segregating sensitive internal networks from the Internet and other accessible networks.

SF: What’s the best way to get the most out of using Smoothwall?

Smoothwall Team: Join our community and see what other extensions (mods) people have written. Download it. Install it. Configure it. Go to the community forum and ask questions. As shipped, Smoothwall is relatively basic. Members of the online community have added many installable features (we call them ‘mods’); we incorporated a few of those mods in version 3.1, carefully choosing a few that belong in a firewall. These mods add valuable functionality to the firewall for those who need it.

SF: What has your project team done to help build and nurture your community?

Smoothwall Team: The Web forum is the main thing here. We maintain a friendly, on-topic discussion forum where all are treated with dignity and respect. (OK, sometimes the old-timers needle each other.) Back in ’08 when Murphy (the current project director) was looking for a better firewall than those that he found in commodity devices, he checked out most of the Open Source systems and kept coming back to Smoothwall for two reasons. First, even though Smoothwall Express 3.0 was a little limited in hardware support, it was still the easiest to install and configure. Second, the online forum is by far the most friendly and helpful that he’d encountered. There are no bad mods and no dumb questions. Mods are improved and questions are clarified. And everyone benefits.

SF: Have you all found that more frequent releases helps build up your community of users?

Smoothwall Team: More frequent updates stave off disillusionment among users. As long as their problems are taken seriously and they see that progress is being made, users will stick around. And has always been true, word of mouth is still the best advertising.

SF: What was the first big thing that happened for your project?

Smoothwall Team: In 2001 we had our first “big” release. It added many new features and really got the project noticed. The most recent big thing was turning the project direction over to Neal Murphy in 2013.

SF: What helped make that happen?

Smoothwall Team: In 2009, Murphy started work on a friendly fork of Smoothwall. He spent five years greatly improving the build system, tweaking the UI to make it easier to understand, and updating most the underlying Open Source software packages. That’s why when Murphy took the reins in 2014, we merged most of this friendly fork into Smoothwall Express.

SF: What was the net result for that event?

Smoothwall Team: People around the world began to see that ordinary people could install and maintain a firewall to protect their networks. In the second case, Smoothwall Express became much easier for almost anyone to build. Version 3.1 was released in October, 2014. We’ve release two updates since.

SF: What is the next big thing for Smoothwall?

Smoothwall Team: I think the next big thing will be to restore Smoothwall’ relevance to the network security market. Most commodity firewall/routers do what Smoothwall set out to accomplish; it’s time for Smoothwall to
lead the way into the next 15 years of network security. Most businesses need email, web, fax, video security, multimedia, and other services; some home and SOHO users need some of those services too. Today’s ‘retired’ computers often contain far more memory and CPU power than Smoothwall needs and we intend to use it. We will make it easy for people to configure and run virtual machines on top of Smoothwall Express, with one service per VM.

SF: How long do you think that will take?

Smoothwall Team: It will take at least a year and probably won’t start for at least a year. There are still many latent problems, niggling things that aren’t right, inherited from previous versions that must be fixed. We’re not here just to add features ad infinitum. Smoothwall Express is a solid running, secure firewall, but we do have to take the time to fix things that are wrong. Once done, then we can move on to major feature changes.

SF: Do you have the resources you need to make that happen?

Smoothwall Team: Not quite yet. We’re rebuilding the development team and the team’s expertise. Over the years, updates lagged and enthusiasm for the project waned. Otherwise, SourceForge provides the central source management and product release controls. Smoothwall, Ltd. provides the server for the forum and website and some other data-related activities.

SF: If you had it to do over again, what would you do differently for Smoothwall?

Smoothwall Team: Publish the code in a public repo much sooner than we did. It took us a long time to do this.

SF: Why publish the code?

Smoothwall Team: It makes it easier for people to contribute when they can access the sources. In the early stages of Smoothwall Express, this was quite difficult.

SF: Is there anything else we should know?

Smoothwall Team: Since the initial release of Smoothwall, we are proud of the fact that it has been forked several times, and even the forks have been forked. We think that this shows the true power of Open Source and that we started something special with Smoothwall Express.

Even though it may seem like a one-man show at times, Smoothwall Express as a project and a community would fail without a dedicated core of volunteers who support users via the web forum, who maintain the forum (such as scrubbing spammers and scammers from the site), who stub their toes on and report bugs, who fix bugs, who write and proofread documentation, and even the cheerleaders who convince us to continue even when problems seem insurmountable.

Smoothwall is much more than a distributed ISO image; it’s also a group of people who want only to improve Smoothwall Express so new users don’t face the same old problems and few new ones.

[ Download Smoothwall ]

Categories: Open Source

Campaign Tracking with Bit.ly API integration

DevX: Open Source Articles - Thu, 04/30/2015 - 17:27
Learn how to integrate the Bit.ly API with your application to track clicks and automate analysis.
Categories: Open Source