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Open Source

Tips and tricks from a Google Summer of Code veteran

Google Open Source Blog - Wed, 08/27/2014 - 20:00
Today we have guest writer Victoria MartĂ­nez de la Cruz providing her take on how to have a successful Google Summer of Code. Victoria just finished her summer working with OpenStack, an open source tool for building private and public clouds. Read below for some of her great tips on how to conquer the summer as a GSoC student. 
The end of Google Summer of Code (GSoC) is near and I wanted to share with readers my perception of what it takes to participate in GSoC, to work in an open source environment and what to expect after the program.

What it takes
Participating in GSoC will allow you to learn about the latest technologies and to contribute to the open source organization project of your choice. Every project is different, so any previous knowledge you should have and tools you are expected to use depend on the project plans.You don't need to be a hacker, but in my opinion, it really helps to have deep understanding of several computer science concepts.

The learning curve can be high. It really helps to become familiar with the project code—discover where things are located and how they interact to make the application work ahead of time. You also will have to become familiar with the programming style of the community. Every organization has its conventions and it’s important to stick to good practices to guarantee high quality code. Students are required to understand the workflow, including how to submit your code for review, how the review process works and what is required to get it merged. Finally, you have to start working on your specific project— sometimes a bit harder than you might think!

It’s important to be proactive and take initiative. Research things you don't understand and collect as many resources as you can to make your own decisions. It is better to be wrong about something and fix it with the feedback submitted by the reviewers than to waste time poking people to ask their opinion on a subject they may not be so familiar with.

Working with a mentor
I want to emphasize how important it is to find a good mentor and to get along with them. It is essential that you share with them both what you feel good about and what is making you nuts! Given that GSoC is a remote program, it is always a good idea to keep your mentor up to speed on what you are doing. Otherwise they cannot track your efforts and they won't notice if you are stuck on something.

Seek to find a good balance—contact your mentor often, but don't expect them to devote all of their time to you. And don’t forget about taking advantage of the developer community. If your mentor cannot reply to your questions for some reason, you can also ask someone else.

What to expect after GSoC
Once you have walked down the GSoC path, you have several options. You can stop contributing to the project you worked on and continue with something else that you like more, you can keep contributing as a volunteer, or you can try to find a full-time job to keep working on it. What you decide to do is up to you, but at the very least you have built a strong background that will be useful in your career.

In short
  • GSoC is an incredible opportunity. You will learn about programming tools and practices used in real world deployments, and you will build the experience and confidence necessary for a future job. It is really worth the effort!
  • Become familiar with the project before the summer starts. If you can get in touch with the project community and contribute with a small fix, it will make it easier for you to apply later to GSoC.
  • Share as much as possible with your mentor. Interact with the community. Get to know them, it's important. Open source projects work because of their communities.
  • Your contributions are as important as other people's. Review other people’s patches and submit feedback. You will not only learn a lot, but they will be more likely to review your patches.

By Victoria Martinez de la Cruz, Google Summer of Code Student, 2014



Categories: Open Source

NetBeans Podcast 70 - Community Satisfaction

NetBeans Highlights - Wed, 08/27/2014 - 01:36
Senior Group Manager Ashwin Rao discusses how NetBeans's satisfaction surveys benefit the community. Ken Fogel of the popular "NetBeans in the Classroom" series explains why NetBeans is an ideal teaching tool.
Categories: Java, Open Source

10th Year of Google Summer of Code draws to a close

Google Open Source Blog - Tue, 08/26/2014 - 23:00
This has been a big year for Google Summer of Code, our program designed to introduce university students from around the world to open source development. In celebration of our 10th instance of the program we made a lot of changes.

In April, we accepted more students than we ever have before: 1,307 university students from 72 countries. We raised the stipend for them: the successful participants were paid $5,500 over the course of the program. These students wrote code for the largest number of open source organizations we’ve ever had participate: 190. And last but not least, we had 2491 mentors from 78 countries help them out. We are excited to announce that 89.7%* (1172) of the students passed their final evaluations. To see more about how that compares to previous years, check out our statistics from the last nine years of the program.

And we’re not done yet. This October we’ll be hosting a 10-year reunion in San Jose, California. We’ll welcome our alumni (students, mentors, and organization administrators) from all years of the program to meet and exchange ideas.

Now that this year’s program has concluded, students are busy preparing their code samples for all eyes to see. Soon you will be able to go to the program site where organizations will have links to the students’ code repositories.

Thank you to all of the students, mentors and organization administrators that have helped to make this 10th year of the Google Summer of Code a great success!

By Carol Smith, Open Source Programs

* This number could change slightly in the next few weeks



Categories: Open Source

Commandline Hero

This project makes all your tiny commandline tools on your desktop-pc available over http via a browser-interface or directly over a JSON interface. The primary goals are:

  • Make your commandline tools available on mobile devices or any oher device with a web-browser without any programing effort
  • Use JSON to make your commandline tools available in other distributed applications.
Categories: Open Source

Contrast for Eclipse

Contrast for Eclipse makes Contrast's award winning security analysis technology available to Java developers via a fully integrated Eclipse Java IDE experience. It is a free, easy to use, and powerful application security tool that expertly pinpoints vulnerabilities such as SQL Injection and Cross-Site Scripting -- right at the source.

Contrast for Eclipse features

  • Automated detection of OWASP Top 10 vulnerabilities
  • Transparent integration with the Eclipse IDE
  • Detailed data flow analysis of the running application
  • Vulnerability traceback in the source code
  • Context sensitive expert security advice

Contrast for Eclipse installs in minutes, requires no configuration, and tests your code against the OWASP Top 10. Get secure today!

Visit www.contrastsecurity.com for more security solutions that help applications test themselves at any scale.

Categories: Open Source

Projects of the Week, August 25, 2014

SourceForge.net: Front page news - Mon, 08/25/2014 - 17:00

Here are the featured projects for the week, which appear on the front page of SourceForge.net:

Ares Galaxy

Ares Galaxy is a free, open source BitTorrent and chat program that uses its own decentralized supernode/leaf network. Ares Galaxy has a simple, quick access interface with a built in audio/video viewer. Ares allows you to share any digital file including images, audio, video, software, documents, etc. You may now easily publish your files through the Ares’ peer-to-peer (P2P) network.

[ Download Ares Galaxy ]

7-Zip

7-Zip is a file archiver with a high compression ratio. You can use 7-Zip on any computer, including a computer in a commercial organization. You don’t need to register or pay for 7-Zip. 7-Zip works for Windows 7, Vista, XP, 2008, 2003, 2000, NT, ME, and 98. And there is a port of the command line version to Linux/Unix.

[ Download 7-Zip ]

PortableApps

PortableApps.com is the world’s most popular portable software solution allowing you to take your favorite software with you. A fully open source and free platform, it works on any portable storage device (USB flash drive, iPod, memory card, portable hard drive, etc). With millions of users all over the world and a full collection of open source software (as well as freeware and commercial software), PortableApps.com is the most complete solution for life on the go.

[ Download PortableApps ]

Notepad++

Notepad++ is a free (as in “free speech” and also as in “free beer”) source code editor and Notepad replacement that supports several languages. Running in the MS Windows environment, its use is governed by GPL License.

[ Download Notepad++ ]

MinGW – Minimalist GNU for Windows

A native Windows port of the GNU Compiler Collection (GCC), with freely distributable import libraries and header files for building native Windows applications; includes extensions to the MSVC runtime to support C99 functionality. All of MinGW’s software will execute on the 64bit Windows platforms.

[ Download MinGW - Minimalist GNU for Windows ]

Ubuntuzilla: Mozilla Software Installer

An APT repository hosting the Mozilla builds of the latest official releases of Firefox, Thunderbird, and Seamonkey. Do not manually download the files – read the website, http://ubuntuzilla.sourceforge.net for instructions on using the repository.

[ Download Ubuntuzilla: Mozilla Software Installer ]

Apache OpenOffice

Apache OpenOffice (formerly known as OpenOffice.org) is an open-source office productivity software suite containing word processor, spreadsheet, presentation, graphics, formula editor, and database management applications. OpenOffice is available in many languages, works on all common computers, stores data in ODF (the international open standard format), and is able to read and write files in other formats.

[ Download Apache OpenOffice ]

Bitcoin

Bitcoin uses peer-to-peer technology to operate with no central authority or banks to manage transactions. Bitcoins are carried out collectively by the network. Bitcoin is open-source, meaning the design is public, so nobody owns or controls Bitcoin and everyone can take part. Because of its unique properties, Bitcoin allows for exciting uses that could not be covered by any previous payment system.

[ Download Bitcoin ]

corefonts

Core fonts for the Web was a 1996 Microsoft project to create a standard font pack for the Internet. These TrueType font formats are packaged as executable files (.exe) for Microsoft Windows and in BinHexed Stuff-It archives (.sit.hqx) for Macintosh. These packages are still published as freeware under a proprietary license imposing some restrictions on usage and distribution.

[ Download corefonts ]

 

Categories: Open Source

Database .NET 12.6 released

PostgreSQL News - Sat, 08/23/2014 - 01:00

I am happy to announce the new major release of Database .NET 12.6, an innovative, powerful and intuitive multiple database management tool, With it you can Browse objects, Design tables, Edit rows, Export data and Run queries with a consistent interface.

Free, All-In-One, Portable, Standalone (No Installation) and Multlanguage.

Major New features from version 11.1 to 12.6:

The new version is immediately available for download.
Categories: Database, Open Source

Introduction to LESS and SASS CSS Preprocessors

DevX: Open Source Articles - Fri, 08/22/2014 - 15:15
LESS and SASS are very similar style sheet languages, but using either of them will help you write better, more maintainable style sheets than you would using pure CSS.
Categories: Open Source

The Sahana Software Foundation annual conference

Google Open Source Blog - Thu, 08/21/2014 - 20:00
Today we have a post from Michael Howden, Google Summer of Code mentor since 2010, contributor to the Sahana Open Source Disaster Management Software and as of June 2014 CEO of the Sahana Software Foundation. Sahana recently held it’s annual conference in Sri Lanka, bringing contributors together from around the globe. 
The Sahana Software Foundation helps organizations and communities prepare for and respond to disasters by providing open source information management tools. There is not much overlap between the people engaged in disaster management activities using our software and the people who contribute code to it, so it’s important to ensure that our contributors see how their code supports our mission of helping organizations and communities. This is especially important while working with students during Google Summer of Code (GSoC)—and is often hard to do over the mailing list or a Hangout—so we wanted to bring them to the Sahara Annual Conference in Sri Lanka. The conference was sponsored by Google,  AidIQ, Virtusa, The University of Colombo School of Computing and LIRNEAsia which made it possible for the following GSoC mentors and students to attend:
  • Arnav Agrawal
  • Fran Boon
  • Ramindu Deshapriya
  • Michael Howden
  • Somay Jain
  • Mayank Jain
  • Dominic König
  • Gaurav Narula
  • Arnav Sharma
  • Hemant Singh 
  • Nuwan Waidyanatha 
The Sahana Annual Conference consisted of a number of separate events which were being held in parallel with the Indian Ocean Tsunami 10th Anniversary convention (IOTX). This gave the students broad exposure to the Sahana community, users, history, strategy, and of course the code of our open source project.
The main event of the week was the SahanaCamp workshop. These workshops are conducted to help encourage collaboration between coders and disaster management experts. Our students were very impressed to learn about all the places around the world where Sahana was used. It occurred to me that we need to improve our introduction documents so students can have this information before they start work on their projects. One of the highlights of the day for me was having our students give demonstrations of Sahana to people from various disaster management organisations who were attending the SahanaCamp. I was really impressed with their knowledge and professionalism.

There was no way we could get everyone together without cranking out some code— the Common Alerting Protocol (CAP) Code-Fest was a great opportunity for this. A number of CAP experts had been consulted and were also present to work with the Sahana Team. During the day our mentors and students were able to work together to implement new support for sharing alert messages between organizations.

The week wrapped up with our Annual General Meeting, during which we held a number of unconference sessions allowing us to dive into a number of really important areas:
  • Debugging with Eclipse and Firebug. It was a surprise how few of our students knew about using these tools (for example, print statements != debugging), another addition for us to make to our introduction documents.
  • We held a session looking at our GSoC program and how we could improve it. Everyone agreed that face-to-face meetings were valuable and more structured meetings could be useful, especially if they connected students with the end users. We also talked about the value of allowing students to set their own priorities and having ownership over their projects.
The conference allowed our students to see that there is much more to open source than what they saw on their computer screens. But more importantly it gave them a chance to come together, see the bigger picture they are a part of, meet each other face to face, build relationships and make friendships.

“Open source is nothing but a few people with a common goal working together for the betterment of a community by developing software. This I saw in person and this will stick with me for the rest of my life.”
-Arnav Sharma

If you’re interested in finding out more about the conference, please take a look at the blog posts prepared by our students!

By Michael Howden, CEO, Sahana Software Foundation



Categories: Open Source

Barman 1.3.3 released

PostgreSQL News - Thu, 08/21/2014 - 01:00

21 August 2014: 2ndQuadrant is proud to announce the release of version 1.3.3 of Barman, Backup and Recovery Manager for PostgreSQL.

This major release improves robustness of both backup procedures and their monitoring, by introducing:

  • the so-called "smelly backup" control, allowing DBAs to detect possible problems in scheduling of periodical backups, by receiving complaints by "barman check" when the latest available backup for a server is older than a specified timeframe
  • management of retry attempts for base backup copy (for both "barman backup" and "barman recover" commands), making the operation more resilient to temporary issues such as network connection drops

Performance issues have been fixed in relation to remote recovery over existing directories (incremental recovery), by invoking checksum control only when strictly necessary.

Usability has been enhanced through better exception handling, output and logging messages. PostgreSQL 8.3 is also now supported.

The following major bugs have been fixed:

  • Copies "recovery.conf" during remote "barman recover" (#43)
  • Correctly detect pre/post archive hook scripts (#41)

Minor bugs have also been fixed.

Many thanks for funding towards the development of this release go to Agile Business Group (www.agilebg.com), Jobrapido (www.jobrapido.com), Navionics (www.navionics.com), and Subito.it (www.subito.it).

For a complete list of changes, see the "Release Notes" section below.

Links

Release notes

  • Added "last_backup_max_age", a new global/server option that allows administrators to set the max age of the last backup in a catalogue, making it easier to detect any issues with periodical backup execution
  • Improved robustness of "barman backup" by introducing two global/server options: "basebackup_retry_times" and "basebackup_retry_sleep". These options allow an administrator to specify, respectively, the number of attempts for a copy operation after a failure, and the number of seconds of wait before retrying
  • Improved the recovery process via rsync on an existing directory (incremental recovery), by splitting the previous rsync call into several ones - invoking checksum control only when necessary
  • Added support for PostgreSQL 8.3
  • Minor changes:
    • Support for comma separated list values configuration options
    • Improved backup durability by calling fsync() on backup and WAL files during "barman backup" and "barman cron"
    • Improved Nagios output for "barman check --nagios"
    • Display compression ratio for WALs in "barman show-backup"
    • Correctly handled keyboard interruption (CTRL-C) while performing barman backup
    • Improved error messages of failures regarding the stop of a backup
    • Wider coverage of unit tests
  • Bug fixes:
    • Copies "recovery.conf" on the remote server during "barman recover" (#43)
    • Correctly detect pre/post archive hook scripts (#41)

Download

About Barman

Barman (Backup and Recovery Manager) is an open source administration tool for disaster recovery of PostgreSQL servers written in Python. It allows your organisation to perform remote backups of multiple servers in business critical environments and help DBAs during the recovery phase. Barman’s most requested features include backup catalogues, retention policies, remote backup and recovery, archiving and compression of WAL files and backups. Barman is distributed under GNU GPL 3.

Categories: Database, Open Source

Melange: the open source software powering Google Summer of Code

Google Open Source Blog - Wed, 08/20/2014 - 14:52
Daniel Hans, a long time Melange developer, is today’s guest writer. Below he describes a bit about the open source software that makes Google Summer of Code and Google Code-in possible year after year.
There is no Google Summer of Code (GSoC) without Melange, the open source software both GSoC and Google Code-in (GCI) run on. The first release in 2009 was a real game changer for both program administrators and participants. Can you believe that in the pre-Melange era we once ran the program with almost 1,000 students on just a spreadsheet?

But what exactly is Melange? In short, it is a website front end to the database we use to both present information about GSoC and manage the participation of all the projects, mentors and students involved. Melange is a project that supports open source initiatives. Not surprisingly, it is open source itself and has participated as an organization in GSoC from its infancy.

The project was started in 2008 and developed primarily by a group of volunteers who dedicated a considerable amount of time so that it could be deployed one short year later. In the early days of Melange, the user interface was very simple. It visualized the underlying database layer with minimum graphics. Despite its simplicity and initial shortcomings it was a breakthrough, as a lot of tasks which previously had been completed manually became automated. The program could now continue to grow and scale with each year.  By 2011 the layout was completely redesigned to provide a much better user experience. Since launch, almost 40,000 student proposals have been processed through Melange.

This summer we chose four students to work on Melange as a GSoC project and three successfully passed the midterm evaluation. They have all been working hard on projects that will have a real impact on both GSoC and GCI. At the end of the summer we should be able to resolve several high priority issues requested by our users.

Shikher Somal is improving the general workflow of a student participant. For example, student applicants will be able to rank their proposals in order of their own preferences. They will no longer have to rely on the organizations they applied with and program administrators to decide who gets to work with the student (which often occurs when multiple orgs like the same student).

Denys Butenko from Ukraine is working on CSS improvements to make the user interface more responsive. The new UI will look much cleaner on different screen sizes, especially on mobile devices where so much traffic is coming from these days.

Our third participant, Piyush Bansal, is helping to make the Melange developer’s life a bit easier. Piyush successfully completed his first GSoC project in 2013 and has since become an important part of our community since then. This summer he is working on a continuous integration system. His changes are not directly visible to end users but are crucial to our daily workflow. We recently pushed to production a first release for which the developer did not need to run all the tests manually as a part of the deployment process. The buildbot did the job for him.

The summer has been going great and we are really excited about all the work so far. We have already integrated some parts of the students’ projects into the master branch. Is there any better evidence that a GSoC student can make an actual impact? And we are always happy to welcome new contributors. If you would like to make Melange even better, please start by reading the getting started guide. Feel free to get in touch with us on our mailing list.

By Daniel Hans, Google, Melange Developer
Categories: Open Source

Mirur

Visualize your arrays the way they were meant to be. No more using Arrays.toString()!

Mirur can visualize numerical arrays of any size. View 1-dimensional arrays using a line graph or a bar chart. View 2-dimensional data using a heatmap. Or even just view a histogram of all values in the array.

Mirur will visualize anything that can be interpreted as a collection of numbers, including List or AtomicLong[].

Categories: Open Source

Introducing POWA ! A new PostgreSQL Workload Analyzer

PostgreSQL News - Tue, 08/19/2014 - 01:00

DALIBO is proud to present the first release of POWA, a brand new performance tool for PostgreSQL.

Realtime traffic analysis and dynamic graphs

POWA is a workload analyzer that gives a clear view of the current activity of your PostgreSQL servers with a query runtime graph and a block hit/read graph along with a chart of time consuming request over the specified time period.

If you zoom anywhere in one of the graphs, the chart will adjust and show you which queries were running at that time. If you click on a specific query, you will get additional graphs such as read/write time, number of rows affected, local and shared hit, etc.

A bunch of PL functions are also available to access and manage the stats.

Extending pg_stat_statements

Basically PoWA is a PostgreSQL extension designed to historize information given by the pg_stat_statements extension. It provides SQL SRF to gather useful information on a specified time interval.

This first release is ready for production but of course we will continue to improve it. Please install it (or test our demo site) and let's us know what you think of it. Right now what we need most is feedback and new ideas, especially to improve the user experience and the graphic interface...

PoWA is available under the PostgreSQL license. The main code is a PostgreSQL extension written in C and SQL. The user interface is based on Perl and Mojolicious. Obviously the stats are stored in a PostgreSQL database :-)

For the complete list of changes, please checkout the release note on https://github.com/dalibo/powa/blob/master/CHANGELOG.md

Credits

DALIBO would like to thank all the developers who contributed to this release, especially : Marc Cousin for the original idea and Julien Rouhaud for the hard work on the GUI.

POWA is an open project available under the PostgreSQL License. Any contribution to build a better tool is welcome. You just have to send your ideas, features requests or patches using the GitHub tools or directly to powa@dalibo.com

Links :

About POWA :

PoWA is PostgreSQL Workload Analyzer that gathers performance stats and provides real-time charts and graph to help monitor and tune your PostgreSQL servers. It is similar to Oracle AWR or SQL Server MDW.

Code & Demo at http://dalibo.github.io/powa/

About DALIBO :

DALIBO is the leading PostgreSQL company in France, providing support, trainings and consulting to its customers since 2005. The company contributes to the PostgreSQL community in various ways, including : code, articles, translations, free conferences and workshops

Check out DALIBO's open source projects at http://dalibo.github.io

http://www.dalibo.com

Categories: Database, Open Source

Dojo community day Switzerland

The Dojo Toolkit - Announcements - Mon, 08/18/2014 - 22:18

We recently hosted a Dojo Community Day in Brugg, Switzerland on the Saturday following a week of Dojo workshops. We had about 25 Dojo users and committers join us from England, France, Netherlands, Germany, Romania, Austria, and Switzerland for a fun day of hacking and discussions about current and future directions of Dojo.

Zurich

Brugg

We began the day by welcoming the group at the modern university in Brugg/Windisch and, thanks to SitePen, we had Dojo t-shirts and stickers for everyone. After some initial time to socialize and get everyone situated with wifi, I delivered a short talk on the current state of Dojo, and answered questions about the direction of Dojo. We discussed the idea that getting to Dojo 2 would mean completing the packages incrementally that we need, making them work with today’s Dojo 1.x core so people can start adopting them as they are ready, and then calling that Dojo 2 when they are all completed. For example, Intern and dstore are big parts of the Dojo 2 roadmap.

After my talk, Patrick Ruzand of IBM gave a short overview of recent changes to Dojo Mobile in 1.10, and answered a few questions about Delite/Deliteful, IBM’s early work on Dijit 2.0.

Patrick Ruzand

The purpose of the community day was then a mix of hacking and chatting. We split the room into groups based on interest, with the categories chosen as fixing bugs in 1.x, getting involved with Delite/Deliteful, and fixing documentation and tests. We landed a few pull requests from the day and closed some bugs. More importantly, we hopefully have encouraged more people to get involved and helped them understand the process a bit better.

Dojo hacking

Dojo hacking

Around lunch time, we walked to the Havanna restaurant near the river that agreed to provide wifi and a space to hack for the afternoon. We enjoyed Swiss/German food such as wienerschnitzel, while others enjoyed the Swiss take on Mexican food like fajitas and tacos. We continued talking about may different Dojo topics, and then spent a few more hours hacking on Dojo.

Dojo lunch Brugg

Dojo lunch Brugg

The main challenge with days like this is that there is never enough time. It was great meeting so many Dojo users, and catching up with several Dojo committers. We hope to run similar events later this year after other SitePen Dojo workshops.

Categories: Open Source, RIA

Projects of the Week, August 18, 2014

SourceForge.net: Front page news - Mon, 08/18/2014 - 18:04

Here are the projects that we’re featuring this week on the front page of SourceForge.net:

Ares Galaxy

Ares Galaxy is a free, open source BitTorrent and chat program that uses its own decentralized supernode/leaf network. Ares Galaxy has a simple, quick access interface with a built in audio/video viewer. Ares allows you to share any digital file including images, audio, video, software, documents, etc. You may now easily publish your files through the Ares’ peer-to-peer (P2P) network.

[ Download Ares Galaxy ]

Media Player Classic Home Cinema

MPC-HC is an extremely light-weight, open source media player for Windows®. It supports all common video and audio file formats available for playback. We are 100% spyware free, there are no advertisements or toolbars.

[ Download Media Player Classic Home Cinema ]

7-Zip

7-Zip is a file archiver with a high compression ratio. You can use 7-Zip on any computer, including a computer in a commercial organization. You don’t need to register or pay for 7-Zip. 7-Zip works for Windows 7, Vista, XP, 2008, 2003, 2000, NT, ME, and 98. And there is a port of the command line version to Linux/Unix.

[ Download 7-Zip ]

PortableApps

PortableApps.com is the world’s most popular portable software solution allowing you to take your favorite software with you. A fully open source and free platform, it works on any portable storage device (USB flash drive, iPod, memory card, portable hard drive, etc). With millions of users all over the world and a full collection of open source software (as well as freeware and commercial software), PortableApps.com is the most complete solution for life on the go.

[ Download PortableApps ]

cpuminer

cpuminer is a multi-threaded, highly optimized CPU miner for Litecoin, Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies. Currently supported algorithms are SHA-256d and scrypt(1024, 1, 1). It supports the getwork mining protocol as well as the Stratum mining protocol, and can be used for both solo and pooled mining.

[ Download cpuminer ]

Notepad++

Notepad++ is a free (as in “free speech” and also as in “free beer”) source code editor and Notepad replacement that supports several languages. Running in the MS Windows environment, its use is governed by GPL License.

[ Download Notepad++ ]

MinGW – Minimalist GNU for Windows

A native Windows port of the GNU Compiler Collection (GCC), with freely distributable import libraries and header files for building native Windows applications; includes extensions to the MSVC runtime to support C99 functionality. All of MinGW’s software will execute on the 64bit Windows platforms.

[ Download MinGW - Minimalist GNU for Windows ]

Ubuntuzilla: Mozilla Software Installer

An APT repository hosting the Mozilla builds of the latest official releases of Firefox, Thunderbird, and Seamonkey. Do not manually download the files – read the website, http://ubuntuzilla.sourceforge.net for instructions on using the repository.

[ Download Ubuntuzilla: Mozilla Software Installer ]

SMPlayer

SMPlayer is a free media player for Windows and Linux with built-in codecs that can also play and download Youtube videos. One of the most interesting features of SMPlayer is that it remembers the settings of all files you play. SMPlayer is a graphical user interface (GUI) for the award-winning MPlayer, which is capable of playing almost all known video and audio formats. But apart from providing access for the most common and useful options of MPlayer, SMPlayer adds other interesting features like the possibility to play Youtube videos or download subtitles.

[ Download SMPlayer ]

Categories: Open Source

DBD::Pg 3.4.0 released

PostgreSQL News - Mon, 08/18/2014 - 01:00

Version 3.4.0 of DBD::Pg, the Perl driver for Postgres, has been released: http://search.cpan.org/dist/DBD-Pg/

This version greatly enhanced the table_info() and column_info() methods.

Categories: Database, Open Source

Google Summer of Code new organizations - Part Seven

Google Open Source Blog - Fri, 08/15/2014 - 18:00
We have two additional Google Summer of Code organizations to spotlight this week, TEAMMATES and Tatoeba.  Both are new to the program in 2014. Read below for details about the exciting projects their students have taken on this summer.
TEAMMATES is an online feedback management tool for education. It is a not-for-profit project based at the National University of Singapore and funded by education grants. While TEAMMATES-the-service is offered as a free SaaS to the public, TEAMMATES-the-project is primarily a student project that aims to train students in building non-trivial software systems. Currently TEAMMATES contains the work of over 100 students and is used by both teachers and students from over 100 universities.TEAMMATES is a JavaEE application running on Google App Engine.
In GSoC 2014, we have 4 students—Gu Junchao, Low WeiLin, Thyagesh Manikandan, and Xie Kai are each adding new major features to TEAMMATES. 
  • Junchao is adding fine-grain access control to enable variable access levels to different instructors for the same course. 
  • WeiLin is adding the ability to see statistics for responses collected in feedback sessions
  • Thyagesh is adding the function for students to create user profiles within TEAMMATES
  • Xie Kai working on a feature for instructors to comment on students, teams, and feedback responses submitted
By Damith Rajapakse, Organization administrator for TEAMMATES
----------------------------
Tatoeba is a platform that aims to build a large database of sentences and their translations into as many languages as possible. The initial idea was to have a tool in which you could search certain words, and it would return example sentences containing these words with their translations in the desired languages. The name Tatoeba resulted from this concept, because "tatoeba" means "for example" in Japanese. 
Anyone can contribute to add new sentences and translations. The data collected is redistributed under the CC-BY license.
Our organization is mentoring 4 GSoC students this year:
  • Jake, working on an export to Anki deck. The application will take an Anki deck from the user, compare it against Tatoeba's database, and generate a new deck with sentences where the user will know one new word
  • Pallav, working on administrative scripts. The project's main aim is to create scripts that simplify the task of setting up a development/production environment for Tatoeba, along a few supporting scripts that can perform backup, restore, export, import, etc
  • Saeb, working on a Python rewrite of Tatoeba. We hope that the resulting prototype will be the foundation for the next and better version of Tatoeba, with awesome new feature
  • Harsh, working on a mass import system for open texts. This will be a boost for the database because the system will not import just any sentence. It will have to evaluate what is a good sentence to meet the Tatoeba community's need for high quality.
By Trang Ho, Organization Administrator for Tatoeba
Categories: Open Source

Text Analytics with AQL and IBM InfoSphere BigInsights

DevX: Open Source Articles - Fri, 08/15/2014 - 12:26
Delve into using Annotation Query language (AQL) for text analytics along with IBM InfoSphere BigInsights.
Categories: Open Source

My Google Summer of Code journey: From student, to mentor, to organization administrator

Google Open Source Blog - Wed, 08/13/2014 - 20:00
Today’s post comes from guest blogger Ana Cutillas — a dedicated Google Summer of Code student, mentor, and now organization administrator for Systers, a forum for women involved in the technical aspects of computing. The email list has over 4,000 members from at least 54 countries around the world. Ana is passionate about all things open source and shares a bit of her story below. 
A few years ago, a friend told me about a cool open source program called Google Summer of Code (GSoC). I was reluctant to get involved — I had no idea where to start! But when the organizations for GSoC 2012 were made public, I felt ready. I skimmed through the list and one of them caught my eye. Systers. Funny name. I read more about them: an international electronic mailing list for technical women in computing. Awesome! I decided to apply and before I knew it, I was a full time student, full-time worker, an Ultimate Frisbee player and applying to become a GSoC participant. Needless to say, I was quite busy.

For the application, Systers required that you install their environment in your machine and fix a bug for them. It wasn't easy. I had so many questions! Thankfully I had already joined the Systers' developers mailing list and I decided to ask them. At the beginning, mentors-to-be answered my questions but eventually new potential students joined the list and I knew the answers to some of their questions. It felt great to be able to help people already.

I finished my application before the deadline and I got feedback from Systers that helped me make it better. They told me that GSoC wasn’t compatible with having a full time job (they were right, it definitely isn't). They suggested I should either volunteer my time and have someone mentor me outside of the program, or leave my job and apply to be an official GSoC student. I didn't have to give it much thought—I left the job I didn't like for the possibility of an awesome summer.
Throughout the application process, I became friends with another student that wanted to work with Systers too. The night of the accepted students announcement, we were both so nervous. I remember walking back home from my Ultimate Frisbee practice when she told me she had gotten the email. I had a rush of mixed emotions, I was so happy for her but worried about where mine was. Maybe I hadn't made it? After several of the longest minutes of my life, there it was! I made it!
Systers set me up with two mentors. During the community bonding period we went through my summer schedule until we were all happy with it. The coding period started and I dived head first into my project. I spent my summer working in Python, and learning about open source project etiquette and culture. When I didn't know where to find the files I needed to do something, I could ask my senior mentor and she just knew. I feel very fortunate to have worked with her and I still turn to her for career advice.

A few months after GSoC ended, I got  an email from our administrator to the mailing list saying that Systers was going to try to participate in GSoC again that year (in 2013). I immediately wrote her back and told her that I would like to be a mentor. I was really nervous about being a mentor, a lot more than I was when I was a student. As a student you’re just expected to get your work done, ask questions and slowly become part of the community. However, as a mentor, I was expected to be a role model. I had such an amazing experience with my mentor and I really wanted to provide the same experience to my student.

All my worries went away as soon as I met my student.  As far as students go, I hit the jackpot! She was extremely smart, really organized, got her work done on time and was absolutely fantastic to work with.

Later in the year I was chosen to go to the mentor summit at the Google campus in California. There, I got to meet some of the people that had mentored me when I was a student. The summit has truly been one of the best experiences of my life. It was so cool to be surrounded by tons of exceptionally smart people who were also really passionate about open source.

Shortly after the summit, our administrator asked me if I wanted to help out as an org admin as well as be a mentor for 2014 GSoC. I didn’t have to think about it, I happily accepted. I’m happy to report our organization has grown a lot in a year. We’ve gone from six to 14 students and we’ve been able to recruit about four mentors per student.  And what a ride I’ve been on. I’m excited to continue my work with Systers and can’t wait to see what’s next for Google Summer of Code.

By Ana Cutillas, Google Summer of Code Student, Mentor, and Organization Administrator for Systers

Categories: Open Source

EclipseCon Europe - Early-bird talks

Eclipse News - Wed, 08/13/2014 - 15:38
The EclipseCon Europe submission are in and the early-bird talks have been selected. Stay tuned for the program announcement.
Categories: Open Source