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Open Source

Phaser Editor Templates

Date Created: April 13, 2015 - 00:53Date Updated: April 24, 2015 - 05:30Submitted by: Arian Fornaris [boniatillo.com]

Editor templates for the PhaserJS game engine (http://phaser.io).

This templates are an adaptation to Eclipse of the Phaser Editor Sandbox (http://phaser.io/sandbox).

For more information: https://bitbucket.org/boniatillo/phasereditortemplates

We also recommend Phaser Chains for Eclipse.

Categories: Open Source

iCTeam - Automotive ALM solution

Date Created: April 12, 2015 - 11:54Date Updated: April 13, 2015 - 09:45Submitted by: Jyothi G.Shivashankar

iCTeam is an Application Lifecycle Management (ALM) Solution providing end-to-end process and tool support for software engineering needs. It is an Eclipse solution based on OSEE an open source Eclipse project from the Boeing Company.
The iCTeam framework can seamlessly integrate external tools to provide traceability from requirements to release.

iCTeam provides the process support for ASPICE compliance and is qualified as per ISO 26262 to support software development of safety level upto ASIL-D.
ICteam includes support to Model based development and AUTOSAR life cycle.

iCTeam comes in two editions.

Enterprise edition : Supports all phases of software development within an organization

Shared Edition : Supports the joint development activities between an OEM and its suppliers. They can together define and review requirements, Integrate software, plan and track test cases, share calibration packages and datasets.
An OEM can host the iCTeam application on a server with controlled access to suppliers to manage/monitor joint development activities ( private/hybrid cloud ).

Categories: Open Source

Robert Bosch Engineering and Business solutions Pvt Ltd

Date Created: April 12, 2015 - 10:46Date Updated: April 13, 2015 - 09:45Submitted by: Jyothi G.ShivashankarRobert Bosch Engineering and Business Solutions Pvt Limited (RBEI), is a 100% owned subsidiary of Robert Bosch GmbH, one of the world’s leading global supplier of technology and...http://www.bosch-india-software.com/India
Categories: Open Source

Writing RESTful Web Services in Python with Flask

DevX: Open Source Articles - Fri, 04/10/2015 - 20:44
Explore the various components of a REST API built on top of Flask-RestFUL via a simple example.
Categories: Open Source

Google Code-in 2014 wrap up with Drupal

Google Open Source Blog - Fri, 04/10/2015 - 17:00
Drupal, one of the Google Code-in 2014 mentoring organizations, has been working toward the release of a new major version. Grand prize winner Getulio Valentin Sanchez contributed to the upcoming release during the contest and shared his story with us.

I was 13 years old the first time I got access to a computer. I had no idea how to connect it to the internet, but that didn’t stop me from experimenting. When I was 14, I saw a documentary about Google and discovered that “programming” and “coding” were completely different things than I’d thought. In that same documentary, I saw Google’s offices and I resolved to myself that I would try to visit them in person by the time I turned 18.
After participating in an OMAPA Computer Olympics event here in Paraguay, a Google Code-in (GCI) mentor from Sugar Labs contacted me to ask if I could help spread the word about GCI in my local community. During that conversation, the mentor encouraged me to enter GCI myself. He pointed out that Drupal was one of the mentoring organizations and they use a lot of PHP, the language I’m most familiar with.
Before GCI, I had never worked with an open source project, nor did I know how to create a patch or anything like that. But since it was a possible opportunity to achieve the dream I’d set for myself, I thought “why not learn something new?”
When the contest began, I got to work on my first task: porting the simple but useful Scroll To Top module to Drupal 8. It was astonishing to me when my patch was approved and committed. With that astonishment came an amazing sensation in knowing that somewhere in the world, someone will be using something that I made. Tasks like these were a little challenging, but I quickly fell in love with this type of work and created a series of blog posts and a video about the process.
I continued porting modules to Drupal 8 throughout the GCI contest. I think the most difficult task I faced was porting the Administer Users by Role module. This wasn’t because it’s a large module, but rather because I had to learn about access checking which I’d never heard about before. Although this wasn’t impossible, it took me about a week to get an initial version ready for the community’s consideration.
The seven weeks I spent participating in GCI taught me a lot. I learned about following coding standards, programming concepts like dependency injection and the Hollywood principle, some of the more powerful features of Git, and features of PHP that I hadn’t even known existed!
People say every end is a new beginning, and that’s been true for me. The end of GCI 2014 was also the beginning of my experience as a regular contributor to Drupal. I now spend my weekends working with this amazing platform and collaborating with the Drupal community. And soon, I’ll be beginning my journey to see Google’s offices in person like I’d dreamed of before -- I began with a humble “Hello World” and eventually became one of the GCI 2014 Grand Prize Winners.

by Getulio Valentin Sanchez, GCI grand prize winner
Categories: Open Source

EMF Refactor

Date Created: April 10, 2015 - 08:07Date Updated: April 10, 2015 - 09:39Submitted by: Thorsten Arendt

EMF Refactor is an Eclipse open source tool environment conveniently supporting a structured model quality assurance process. In particular, EMF Refactor supports metrics reporting, smell detection, and refactoring for models being based on the Eclipse Modeling Framework, a widely used open source technology in model-based software development.

The following major functionalities are provided:

User-friendly support for project-specific configurations of model metrics, smells, and refactorings.

Calculation of model metrics, detection of model smells, and application of model refactorings.

Generation of model metrics and smell detection reports.

Suggestion of suitable refactorings in case of specific smell occurrences.

Provision of suitable information in cases where new model smells come in by applying a certain refactoring.

Support for the implementation of new model metrics, smells, and refactorings.

The tool environment mainly consists of two kinds of modules: For calculating model metrics, detecting smells, and executing refactorings there is an application module each. Similarly there are three specification modules for generating metrics, smell, and refactoring plugins containing Java code that can be used by the corresponding application module.

Categories: Open Source

How to format Python code without really trying

Google Open Source Blog - Thu, 04/09/2015 - 21:54
Years of writing and maintaining Python code have taught us the value of automated tools for code formatting, but the existing ones didn’t quite do what we wanted. In the best traditions of the open source community, it was time to write yet another Python formatter.
YAPF takes a different approach to formatting Python code: it reformats the entire program, not just individual lines or constructs that violate a style guide rule. The ultimate goal is to let  engineers focus on the bigger picture and not worry about the formatting. The end result should look the same as if an engineer had worried about the formatting.
You can run YAPF on the entire program or just a part of the program. It’s also possible to flag certain parts of a program which YAPF shouldn’t alter, which is useful for generated files or sections with large literals.
Consider this horribly-formatted code:
x = {  'a':37,'b':42,
'c':927}
y = 'hello ''world'z = 'hello '+'world'a = 'hello {}'.format('world')class foo  (     object  ):  def f    (self   ):    return       \37*-+2  def g(self, x,y=42):      return ydef f  (   a ) :  return      37+-+a[42-x :  y**3]
YAPF reformats this into something much more consistent and readable:
x = {'a': 37, 'b': 42, 'c': 927}
y = 'hello ' 'world'z = 'hello ' + 'world'a = 'hello {}'.format('world')

class foo(object):    def f(self):        return 37 * -+2
   def g(self, x, y=42):        return y

def f(a):    return 37 + -+a[42 - x:y ** 3]
Head to YAPF's GitHub page for more information on how to use it, and take a look at YAPF’s own source code to see a much larger example of the output it produces.
by Bill Wendling, YouTube Code Health Team
Categories: Open Source

Google Summer of Code: Meet-up Round-up!

Google Open Source Blog - Thu, 04/09/2015 - 21:51
Over the past ten years, Google Summer of Code (GSoC) has given over 8,500 students a bridge into open source communities. GSoC alumni have played a large role in the program’s success by encouraging their fellow students to take part. Around the world, energetic students who have already participated in GSoC lead the way by hosting meet-up events that help others learn about the opportunities GSoC provides and get answers to their questions about the program. Who better than GSoC alumni to tell students what it’s really like spending the summer coding for open source projects?

Student applications for GSoC 2015 are open until March 27th, so the community has been spreading the word at school and beyond during the past few months. Here are just a few of the student-initiated events we’ve heard about recently.
Buea, Cameroon: 17 December 2014
Chris Nuvagda wanted to spread the word about GSoC after finishing his project, so he reached out to other GSoC alumni at the University of Buea to make it happen. Over 150 students attended the meet-up, with about 30% being women -- a number we’re happy to hear since only 10% of GSoC 2014 students were women and we’re trying to improve on that. The 5 presenters spoke about their experiences in GSoC and the benefits of it, gave advice on writing a great proposal, and shared what it’s like for women working in open source. Read more...


Delhi, India: 31 January 2015
Heena Mahour and Ayush Gupta hosted a meet-up for about 200 prospective students and open source enthusiasts. With help from others in their community, they organized a full-day event featuring 8 speakers. Students who previously participated with organizations like KDE, OWASP, and Mifos shared their experiences and answered questions from the audience. Technical topics were also discussed, including memory leaks and an introduction to version control systems. Read more...


Udine, Italy: 24 February 2015
Claudio Desideri spent GSoC 2014 coding for KDE and organized a meet-up for students at the University of Udine. With 80 attendees, there were just barely enough seats for everyone. Claudio shared his personal experiences but also learned that many students who might want to apply to GSoC fear being judged by potential mentors or failing out of the program. He helped reassure students that GSoC is an opportunity to grow and that they aren’t expected to already know everything. Read more...


Bangalore, India: 2 March 2015
With a desire to increase the participation of nearby colleges, especially among female students, Tejas Dharamsi and Rajath Kumar organized a GSoC meet-up at the Google Bangalore office. 102 students, including 44 women, from 11 colleges gathered to hear from the 6 speakers who shared details about the coding projects they worked on and gave practical advice for students applying to GSoC for the first time. The ending panel discussion gave attendees a chance to ask questions and offered students encouragement to apply for the program. Read more...


Kampala, Uganda: 12 March 2015
Organized by Kaweesi Joseph with help from OpenMRS, the organization he worked with during GSoC 2014, more than 110 students gathered for this meet-up. The 5 presenters discussed the benefits of contributing to open source, how students can participate in GSoC, and how OpenMRS is being used in Uganda. Read more...


We thank these GSoC alumni and many more who are spreading their enthusiasm for open source in their local communities. It’s because of local networking events like these that GSoC is able to have rich representation from all around the world. We look forward to welcoming some of these meet-up attendees into the upcoming Google Summer of Code 2015 -- don’t forget to apply before March 27th!

By Ashleigh Rentz, Open Source team, with thanks to everyone who allowed us to share their stories and photos here.
Categories: Open Source

We throw pie with a little help from our friends

Google Open Source Blog - Thu, 04/09/2015 - 21:32

(Cross-posted with the Google Developers Blog)

Fun Propulsion Labs at Google* is back today with some new releases for game developers. We’ve updated Pie Noon (our open source Android TV game) with networked multi-screen action, and we’ve also added some delicious new libraries we’ve been baking since the original release: the Pindrop audio library and the Motive animation system.

Pie Noon multi-screen action

Got an Android TV and up to 4 friends with Android phones or tablets? You’re ready for some strategic multi-player mayhem in this updated game mode. Plan your next move in secret on your Android phone: will you throw at an opponent, block an incoming attack, or take the risky approach and wait for a larger pie? Choose your target and action, then watch the Android TV to see what happens!

We used the NearbyConnections API from the most recent version of Google Play Games services to easily connect smartphones to your Android TV and turn our original Pie Noon party game into a game of turn-based strategy. You can grab the latest version of Pie Noon from Google Play to try it out, or crack open the source code and take a look at how we used FlatBuffers to encode data across the network in a fast, portable, bandwidth-efficient way.

Pindrop: an open source game audio library

Pindrop is a cross-platform C++ library for managing your in-game audio. It supports cross compilation to Android, Linux, iOS and OSX. An early version of this code was part of the first Pie Noon release, but it’s now available as a separate library that you can use in your own games. Pindrop handles loading and unloading sound banks, tracking sound locations and listeners, prioritization of your audio channels, and more.

Pindrop is built on top of several other pieces of open source technology:

  • SDL Mixer is used as a backend for actually playing the audio.
  • The loading of data and configuration files is handled by our serialization library, FlatBuffers.
  • Our own math library, MathFu, is used for a number of under-the-hood calculations.

You can download the latest open source release from our GitHub page. Documentation is available here and a sample project is included in the source tree. Please feel free to post any questions in our discussion list.

Motive: an open source animation system

The Motive animation system can breathe life into your static scenes. It does this by applying motion to simple variables. For example, if you’d like a flashlight to shine on a constantly-moving target, Motive can animate the flashlight so that it moves smoothly yet responsively.

Motive animates both spline-based motion and procedural motion. These types of motion are not technically difficult, but they are artistically subtle. It's easy to get the math wrong. It's easy to end up with something that moves as required but doesn't quite feel right. Motive does the math and lets you focus on the feeling.

Motive is scalable. It's designed to be extremely fast. It also has a tight memory footprint -- smaller than traditional animation compression -- that's based on Dual Cubic Splines. Our hope is that you might consider using Motive as a high-performance back-end to your existing full-featured animation systems.

This initial release of Motive is feature-light since we focused our early efforts on doing something simple very quickly. We support procedural and spline-based animation, but we don't yet support data export from animation packages like Blender or Maya. Motive 1.0 is suitable for props -- trees, cameras, extremities -- but not fully rigged character models.  Like all FPL technologies, Motive is open source and cross-platform. Please check out the discussion list, too.

What’s Fun Propulsion Labs at Google?

You might remember us from such Android games as Pie Noon, LiquidFun Paint, and VoltAir, and such cross-platform libraries as MathFu, LiquidFun, and FlatBuffers.

Want to learn more about our team? Check out this recent episode of Game On! with Todd Kerpelman for the scoop!

by Jon Simantov, Fun Propulsion Labs at Google

* Fun Propulsion Labs is a team within Google that's dedicated to advancing gaming on Android and other platforms.

Categories: Open Source

Introducing gRPC, a new open source HTTP/2 RPC Framework

Google Open Source Blog - Thu, 04/09/2015 - 19:37

(Cross-posted from the Google Developers Blog)

Today, we are open sourcing gRPC, a brand new framework for handling remote procedure calls. It’s BSD licensed, based on the recently finalized HTTP/2 standard, and enables easy creation of highly performant, scalable APIs and microservices in many popular programming languages and platforms. Internally at Google, we are starting to use gRPC to expose most of our public services through gRPC endpoints as part of our long term commitment to HTTP/2.

Over the years, Google has developed underlying systems and technologies to support the largest ecosystem of micro-services in the world; our servers make tens of billions of calls per second within our global datacenters. At this scale, nanoseconds matter. Efficiency, scalability and reliability are at the core of building Google’s APIs.

gRPC is based on many years of experience in building distributed systems. With the new framework, we want to bring to the developer community a modern, bandwidth and CPU efficient, low latency way to create massively distributed systems that span data centers, as well as power mobile apps, real-time communications, IoT devices and APIs.

Building on HTTP/2 standards brings many capabilities such as bidirectional streaming, flow control, header compression, multiplexing requests over a single TCP connection and more. These features save battery life and data usage on mobile while speeding up services and web applications running in the cloud.

Developers can write more responsive real-time applications, which scale more easily and make the web more efficient. Read more about the features and benefits in the FAQ.

Alongside gRPC, we are releasing a new version of Protocol Buffers, a high performance, open source binary serialization protocol that allows easy definition of services and automatic generation of client libraries. Proto 3 adds new features, is easier to use compared to previous versions, adds support for more languages and provides canonical mapping of Proto to JSON.

The project has support for C, C++, Java, Go, Node.js, Python, and Ruby. Libraries for Objective-C, PHP and C# are in development. To start contributing, please fork the Github repositories and start submitting pull requests. Also, be sure to check out the documentation, join us on the mailing list, visit the IRC #grpc channel on Freenode and tag StackOverflow questions with the “grpc” tag.

Google has been working closely with Square and other organizations on the gRPC project. We’re all excited for the potential of this technology to improve the web and look forward to further developing the project in the open with the help, direction and contributions of the community.


by Mugur Marculescu, Product Manager
Categories: Open Source

Classp: a “classier” way to parse

Google Open Source Blog - Thu, 04/09/2015 - 19:37
If you’ve worked on compilers, translators, or other tools that need to read a programming language, chances are you’ve spent many painful hours detailing that language’s grammar. Recently, we opened up the source code for Classp, a side-project a few of us have been working on that demonstrates it’s possible to have an automatic parser generator that is not based on formal grammars. Instead of grammar productions, you write classes similar to C++ or Java and you write class patterns to define the syntax. Although there are libraries like Boost.Spirit and Scala Parsers that give you a nice way to write a grammar in the programming language itself, in the end you are still writing a grammar. Even though Classp looks a lot like C++ or Java, it is not just a C-like way to write a grammar. It’s an entirely different way to specify syntax.
Grammars are great for diagramming a complex syntactic structure for human readers, but as a computer specification, they leave a lot to be desired. Four key problems with grammars inspired us to work on Classp as an alternative.
First, a grammar is intended to represent the actual syntactic structure of the language: all of the little details like what goes first and what goes second, where to put your commas and semicolons, where can you substitute one thing for another, etc... But this surface structure doesn’t really matter to the programmer who wants to process the language. It just gets in the way. What you really care about are the logical parts of the declaration: what is the type? What is the name? Is there an initializer and what is it?
Second, many common parser generators don’t actually specify any tree at all. They let the programmer write actions to build up a parse tree. But the actions in most systems tend to form an awkward fit with the grammar.
Next, when you write a grammar, you have to worry not just about the surface structure of the language, but also about how the language will be parsed. You have to write the grammar around ambiguities in the language and sometimes around other features. You can’t just write the rules as you would write them for a human reader:
Expr ::= Int | ( Expr ) | Expr + Expr | Expr - Expr | Expr * Expr | Expr / Expr
instead, you have to write them in a way that avoids ambiguity:
Expr ::= Expr + Term | Expr - Term;Term ::= Term * Factor | Term / FactorFactor ::=  Int | ( Expr )
Finally, grammar-based parsers are extremely verbose. For serious parsing tasks, it is common to write a grammar, design a parse tree, write actions in the grammar to create the parse tree, design an abstract syntax tree, and write code to translate the parse tree into an abstract syntax tree. There are many dependencies among these parts that all have to be kept consistent over the life of the program. It’s a complex and error-prone process.
Classp attempts to avoid these problems. The abstract syntax tree is what programmers typically want to work with. With class patterns, you only have two jobs: design the abstract syntax tree and write a formatter for it. (A formatter is the function that writes out the abstract syntax tree in the target language.)
Here’s an example class declaration for an abstract syntax tree. The class pattern is the part inside the parentheses of the syntax statement: “arg1 '+' arg2”.
class Plus: Expression {  Expression arg1;  Expression arg2;  syntax(arg1 '+' arg2);}
This class pattern says that to print a Plus node, you first print arg1, then you print a plus sign, then you print arg2. So it looks like a nice formatting language, but where do we specify the parser? The answer is that we don’t specify a parser; Classp will invert the formatter to generate a parser for us. Since formatters are typically much easier to write and maintain than parsers, it almost feels like magic.
Classp is still a work in progress. We still have to deal with ambiguity in languages, features that are only output in one way but may be input in several ways, and a few other issues. But it’s ready to play with now and we’d love to hear from others interested in this subject. To learn more, visit http://google.github.io/classp.

By David Gudeman, Classp team
Categories: Open Source

RE2/J: Linear-time regular-expression matching for Java

Google Open Source Blog - Thu, 04/09/2015 - 19:37
Today we’re announcing the public release of RE2/J: a pure-Java implementation of the popular RE2 regular expression library.
Although RE2/J is not always faster than java.util.regexp, its running time is always linear in the size of the input. Thus when matching larger inputs, especially against patterns containing a high degree of alternation, RE2/J may be dramatically faster. With a backtracking implementation such as java.util.regexp, it is not hard to construct a pathological pattern whose matcher would take years to run on some inputs, so RE2/J's performance guarantee makes it suitable for use in applications where the pattern is supplied by untrusted users, such as the clients of a web server.
If you are looking for a detailed technical discussion of the motivation for RE2 and RE2/J and the tradeoffs involved, please see “Regular Expression Matching Can Be Simple And Fast” and “Regular Expression Matching in the Wild”, both written by Russ Cox.
RE2/J is used widely by Java projects within Google. In many cases, it can be used as a drop-in replacement for java.util.regexp. We are pleased to be able to make this library available for public consumption.
Please head to RE2/J’s GitHub page to find out how to use it!
By James Ring, Google Engineering
Categories: Open Source

MapReduce for C: Run Native Code in Hadoop

Google Open Source Blog - Thu, 04/09/2015 - 19:37
MapReduce for C: Run Native Code in Hadoop

We are pleased to announce the release of MapReduce for C (MR4C), an open source framework that allows you to run native code in Hadoop.

MR4C was originally developed at Skybox Imaging to facilitate large scale satellite image processing and geospatial data science. We found the job tracking and cluster management capabilities of Hadoop well-suited for scalable data handling, but also wanted to leverage the powerful ecosystem of proven image processing libraries developed in C and C++. While many software companies that deal with large datasets have built proprietary systems to execute native code in MapReduce frameworks, MR4C represents a flexible solution in this space for use and development by the open source community.

MR4C.png

MR4C is developed around a few simple concepts that facilitate moving your native code to Hadoop. Algorithms are stored in native shared objects that access data from the local filesystem or any uniform resource identifier (URI), while input/output datasets, runtime parameters, and any external libraries are configured using JavaScript Object Notation (JSON) files. Splitting mappers and allocating resources can be configured with Hadoop YARN based tools or at the cluster level for MRv1.  Workflows of multiple algorithms can be strung together using an automatically generated configuration. There are callbacks in place for logging and progress reporting which you can view using the Hadoop JobTracker interface. Your workflow can be built and tested on a local machine using exactly the same interface employed on the target cluster.

If this sounds interesting to you, get started with our documentation and source code at the MR4C GitHub page.  The goal of this project is to abstract the important details of the MapReduce framework and allow users to focus on developing valuable algorithms. Let us know how we're doing in our Google Group.
By Ty Kennedy-Bowdoin, Skybox team
Categories: Open Source

EclipseCon France - Call for Papers Deadline

Eclipse News - Thu, 04/09/2015 - 15:05
Last chance to submit a talk for our conference in Toulouse, France. Deadline is April 14.
Categories: Open Source

PostgreSQL Maestro 15.4 released

PostgreSQL News - Thu, 04/09/2015 - 01:00

SQL Maestro Group announces the release of PostgreSQL Maestro 15.4, a powerful Windows GUI solution for PostgreSQL database server administration and database development.

The new version is immediately available for download.

Top 10 new features:
  1. Tablespace Editor now displays objects belonging to the tablespace.
  2. SQL Formatter now supports WITH queries, queries with the RETURNING clause and LATERAL JOINs.
  3. Adding new values to existing ENUM types.
  4. ALTER SYSTEM statement on changing the value of a server variable.
  5. Executing custom SQL scripts in all database connections established by the software.
  6. Support for a number of new encryption algorithms in data grids.
  7. Colored tabs and more informative tab hints.
  8. Updated Data Export and Data Import tools.
  9. Improved Data Input Form.
  10. Some performance and usability improvements.

There are also some other useful things. Full press release is available at the SQL Maestro Group website.

Categories: Database, Open Source

Eclipse Announces First Release of Eclipse OM2M Project

Eclipse News - Wed, 04/08/2015 - 13:49
The first release of OM2M is now available for download.
Categories: Open Source

ECLIPSEFGL

Date Created: April 8, 2015 - 08:45Date Updated: April 8, 2015 - 09:42Submitted by: Thomas Neumaier

The Eclipse 4GL plug-in is developed in Java by CHILIBYTES for the Eclipse IDE v3 and higher. Similar to plug-ins for PHP and JavaScript, it allows convenient editing of 4GL source code files.

Among other features, Eclipse 4GL offers:
• Syntax Highlighting
• Outlining
• Code Folding
• Auto Completion
• IntelliSense
• Global Includes Direct Access

Simple and fast code editing directly from inside the IDE. Multiple developers can work on the same projects. Complete versioning support in the IDE provided by the plug-in.

Technical Information
• Operating systems: aix, hpux, linux, macosx, qnx, solaris, win32
• Window systems: carbon, gtk, motif, photon, win32, wpf
• Language support: de, de-DE, en, en-EN
• Architecture: ia64, ia64_32, PA_RISC, ppc, sparc, x86, x86_64

Categories: Open Source

PHPGen

Date Created: April 8, 2015 - 04:08Date Updated: April 28, 2015 - 04:52Submitted by: Rolf Loges

Auto-Genereates getter and setter methods to an existing PHP-Class.

Categories: Open Source

Great Fix Winners - Round Two

Eclipse News - Tue, 04/07/2015 - 20:46
Congratulations to the winners of round two! Final deadline is May 6.
Categories: Open Source

Upcoming Features in TypeScript 1.5

DevX: Open Source Articles - Tue, 04/07/2015 - 12:43
Learn what additions to TypeScript Microsoft released last week with version 1.5.
Categories: Open Source