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TBLips

Date Created: Tue, 2017-01-10 15:03Date Updated: Wed, 2017-01-11 10:00TreasureBoat.orgSubmitted by: Ken Ishimoto

This is the first Tool set that you need for creating a TreasureBoat application. Currently TreasureBoat Frameworks are still in private development with Contributors around the world. we still working hardly to get everything in place for the future.

TBLips is the first of many Tools that are needed.

TBLips itself is currently still under development, and we updating it still a lot, so to have it hear on the Marketplace
will help a lot of Developers in this world to move forward more easily.

More information will come here soon, stay tuned.

Categories: Open Source

Apache Beam graduates to a top-level project

Google Open Source Blog - Tue, 01/10/2017 - 18:09
Please join me in extending a hearty digital “Huzzah!” to the Apache Beam community: as announced today, Apache Beam is an official graduate of the Apache Incubator and is now a full-fledged, top-level Apache project. This achievement is a direct reflection of the hard work the community has invested in transforming Beam into an open, professional and community-driven project.

11 months ago, Google and a number of partners donated a giant pile of code to the Apache Software Foundation, thus forming the incubating Beam project. The bulk of this code composed the Google Cloud Dataflow SDK: the libraries that developers used to write streaming and batch pipelines that ran on any supported execution engine. At the time, the main supported engine was Google’s Cloud Dataflow service with support for Apache Spark and Apache Flink in development); as of today there are five officially supported runners. Though there were many motivations behind the creation of Apache Beam, the one at the heart of everything was a desire to build an open and thriving community and ecosystem around this powerful model for data processing that so many of us at Google spent years refining. But taking a project with over a decade of engineering momentum behind it from within a single company and opening it to the world is no small feat. That’s why I feel today’s announcement is so meaningful.

With that context in mind, let’s look at some statistics squirreled away in the graduation maturity model assessment:

  • Out of the ~22 large modules in the codebase, at least 10 modules have been developed from scratch by the community, with little to no contribution from Google.
  • Since September, no single organization has had more than ~50% of the unique contributors per month.
  • The majority of new committers added during incubation came from outside Google.

And for good measure, here’s a quote from the Vice President of the Apache Incubator, lifted from the public Apache incubator general discussions list where Beam’s graduation was first proposed:

“In my day job as well as part of my work at Apache, I have been very impressed at the way that Google really understands how to work with open source communities like Apache. The Apache Beam project is a great example of this and is a great example of how to build a community." -- Ted Dunning, Vice President of Apache Incubator

The point I’m trying to make here is this: while Google’s commitment to Apache Beam remains as strong as it always has been, everyone involved (both within Google and without) has done an excellent job of building an open source project that’s truly open in the best sense of the word.
This is what makes open source software amazing: people coming together to build great, practical systems for everyone to use because the work is exciting, useful and relevant. This is the core reason I was so excited about us creating Apache Beam in the first place, the reason I’m proud to have played some small part in that journey, and the reason I’m so grateful for all the work the community has invested in making the project a reality.
Naturally, graduation is only one milestone in the lifetime of the project, and we have many more ahead of us, but becoming top-level project is an indication that Apache Beam now has a development community that is ready for prime time.
That means we’re ready to continue pushing forward the state of the art in stream and batch processing. We’re ready to bring the promise of portability to programmatic data processing, much in the way SQL has done so for declarative data analysis. We’re ready to build the things that never would have gotten built had this project stayed confined within the walls of Google. And last but perhaps not least, we’re ready to recoup the vast quantities of text space previously consumed by the mandatory “(incubating)” moniker accompanying all of our initial mentions of Apache Beam!
But seriously, whatever your motivation, please consider joining us along the way. We have an exciting road ahead.
By Tyler Akidau, Apache Beam PMC and Staff Software Engineer at Google
Categories: Open Source

S-CASE for IoT

Date Created: Tue, 2017-01-10 06:37Date Updated: Tue, 2017-01-10 09:26S-CASE ConsortiumSubmitted by: S-CASE Support

Complement your IoT project with quickly generated mashups of existing or new RESTful web services

To create a mashup of existing web services, describe your idea with a simple workflow using plain English. S-CASE will take care to find existing services (ProgrammableWeb, Mashape and S-CASE generated services) that do exactly what you need and connect them to create a running REST service, ready for you to use. Register your web services with S-CASE YouREST catalogue to help others find them (even machines, since it comes with machine-readable metadata).

If you need to create new REST APIs, simply start with English text specifying the requirements, add workflow storyboards to describe how your service works and generate Java source code for the service, complete with persistence (ORM and DB schema) and full-text search of service data. All done and compiled in just minutes.

To help you in the wild, S-CASE supports authentication and authorization (up to ABAC), including restricting access to selected resources - all in the code generated for you.

There's more...

Categories: Open Source

Google Summer of Code 2016 blog post round-up

Google Open Source Blog - Tue, 01/10/2017 - 07:26
We’re publishing guest posts from Google Summer of Code (GSoC) students, mentors and organizations every week and more are coming. Many have already written GSoC wrap-up posts on their own blogs, so we’ve rounded them up for you to explore.


Static types in Python, oh my(py)!” by Tim Abbott, org admin for Zulip
“We posted mypy annotations as one of our project ideas for Google Summer of Code (GSoC). We found an incredible student, Eklavya Sharma, for the project. Eklavya did the vast majority of the hard work of annotating Zulip. Amazingly, he also found the time during the summer to migrate Zulip to use virtualenvs and then upgrade Zulip to Python 3!”


A road from Google Summer of Code student to organization administrator” by Araz Abishov, org admin for HISP
“Google has created unprecedented opportunity both for young developers and open source communities, which I think everyone should take advantage of. GSoC is more than just a three months internship, and I hope that this post will be a good example of how it can change anyone’s life.”


Summer of Code 2016: Wrapping it up” by Martin Braun, org admin for GNU Radio
“This summer was a great summer in terms of student participation. All three students will be presenting their work (either in person, or via poster) at this year’s GNU Radio Conference in Boulder, Colorado.”


2016 Google Summer of Code Wrap-Up” by Ed Cable, org admin for Mifos Initiative
“Each year GSoC continues to unite and grow our community in different ways. Once again, we received incredibly valuable contributions to our Mifos X web and mobile clients this summer; most importantly we have cultivated numerous passionate contributors that will be a part of our community long into the future.”


Road to GSoC 2016” by Minh Chu, student who worked on Neverland for KDE
“I was nervous about choosing a project. So many projects and requirements! After many hours, I finally decided to write a proposal for KDE’s Neverland Theme Builder and was accepted.”


Git Rev News” by Christian Couder, mentor for Git
“Such performance improvements as well as the code consolidations around the sequencer are of course very nice. It is interesting and satisfying to see that they are the result of building on top of previous work over the years by GSoC students, mentors and reviewers.”

Elasticsearch Lua II" by Dhaval Kapil, student who worked with LabLua
“My GSoC project this year was entitled ‘Improve elasticsearch-lua tests and builds’ and was a continuation of the work that I had done last year. Apart from adding a test suite for elasticsearch-lua and making it robust, I also decided to work on the documentation of the code."

Google Summer of Code 2016 Conclusion” by Amine Khaldi, org admin for ReactOS
“Students stumble upon many of the same difficulties ReactOS' own senior developers encountered during their early days, including that ever painful but necessary step to using a proper debugger instead of relying on printf statements in the code.”


My Journey in Open Source / How to Get Started Contributing” by Nelson Liu, student who worked on scikit-learn for PSF
“The best way to get started is to simply jump in! There are a myriad of ways to contribute to an open source project. Obviously, writing code to fix bugs, add new features, or enhance existing ones are useful. However, you don't have to write code to help out!”

Google Summer of Code 2016 Student Projects” by Pankaj Nathani, org admin for BuildmLearn
“Many open source projects like ours really benefit from this initiative of Google. Not only do we get large number of university students interested to work on our projects during summer; we also gain new long term contributors and project maintainers."

Lasp and the Google Summer of Code” by Borja o’Cook, student who worked on Lasp for BEAM Community
“All in all, it's been an amazing experience. I've received a lot of support from my mentors and teammates; the Lasp team is full of incredible people.”


GSoC 2016 Students in TEAMMATES” by Damith C. Rajapakse, org admin for TEAMMATES
“We had our biggest batch of students (7 students) in GSoC 2016, selected from 93 proposals, and representing 4 countries and 4 universities, working on TEAMMATES (an online feedback management system for education) and related sub projects.”


User-friendly encryption now in Drupal 8!” by Colan Schwartz, mentor for Drupal
“There were several students interested in the topic, and wrote proposals to match. Talha Paracha's excellent proposal was accepted, and he began in earnest. With Adam Bergstein (nerdstein) and I mentoring him, Talha successfully worked through all phases of the project.”


GSoC with Shogun” by Sanuj Sharma, student who worked on Shogun
“This was an excellent learning experience for me and I got to work with people from different countries (UK, Russia, Singapore, Germany) and cultures. I highly recommend students to participate in Google Summer of Code by looking for projects that interest them because having open source experience is highly beneficial, especially for programmers.”


We have wrap-up posts coming out every week so stay tuned for more. If you’re interested in participating in Google Summer of Code 2017, you can find details here.

By Josh Simmons, Open Source Programs Office
Categories: Open Source

Projects of the Week, January 9, 2017

SourceForge.net: Front page news - Mon, 01/09/2017 - 06:04

Here are the featured projects for the week, which appear on the front page of SourceForge.net:

Pandora FMS: Flexible Monitoring System

Pandora FMS is an enterprise-ready monitoring solution that provides unparalleled flexibility for IT to address both immediate and unforeseen operational issues, including infrastructure and IT processes. It uniquely enables business and IT to adapt to changing needs through a flexible and rapid approach to IT and business deployment. Pandora FMS consolidates all the needs of modern monitoring (ITOM, APM, BAM) and provides status and performance metrics from different operating systems, virtual infrastructure (VMware, Hyper-V, XEN), Docker containers, applications, storage and hardware devices such as firewalls, proxies, databases, web servers or routers. It’s highly scalable (up to 2000 nodes with one single server), 100% web and with multi-tenant capabilities. It has a very flexible ACL system and several different graphical reports and user-defined control screens.
[ Download Pandora FMS: Flexible Monitoring System ]

atom-logo Atom
Atom is a text editor that’s modern, approachable and full-featured. It’s also easily customizable- you can customize it to do anything and be able to use it productively without ever touching a config file.
Atom is free to download and runs on Linux, OS X and Windows with support for plug-ins written in Node.js and embedded Git Control. It is based on Electron (formerly known as Atom Shell),a framework for building cross-platform apps using Chromium and Node.js.
[ Download Atom ]


ShanaEncoder

ShanaEncoder is audio/video encoding program based on FFmpeg. Main Features – Both beginners and professionals can easily use the ShanaEncoder. – Fast encoding speed and quality of professional. – Closed caption, subtitle overlay, logo, crop, segment, etc… ShanaEncoder provides many features. – Support for H.264(High 10) decoding/encoding. – Support for unicode Source: https://shana.pe.kr/ffmpeg
[ Download ShanaEncoder ]


Netrunner OS

Welcome to Netrunner OS page on Sourceforge. Netrunner is a Debian based OS featuring KDE Plasma Desktop. Here you will find the latest releases for download as X86 ISOs and ARM IMGs.
[ Download Netrunner OS ]


Outlook CalDav Synchronizer

Free Outlook Plugin, which synchronizes events, tasks and contacts between Outlook and Google, SOGo, Horde or any other CalDAV or CardDAV server. Supported Outlook versions are 2016, 2013, 2010 and 2007. This project was initially developed as a master thesis project at the University of Applied Sciences Technikum Wien, Software Engineering Degree program. Outlook CalDav Synchronizer is Free and Open-Source Software (FOSS), still you can support the project by donating on Sourceforge or directly within the About dialog of our Plugin. ### New collaboration with Nextcloud, see https://nextcloud.com/blog/nextcloud-offers-caldav-synchronizer-for-outlook-users/ For possible enterprise support contact us here! ### Backport for WinXP available see below! ### German reviews in C’t and PC-Welt http://www.heise.de/ct/ausgabe/2015-27-Kurztest-Outlook-Add-in-3035256.html http://www.pcwelt.de/tipps/Google-Kalender-mit-Outlook-abgleichen-per-CalDAV-Synchronizer-9916911.html ###
[ Download Outlook CalDav Synchronizer ]


VeraCrypt

VeraCrypt is a free disk encryption software brought to you by IDRIX (https://www.idrix.fr) and based on TrueCrypt 7.1a. It adds enhanced security to the algorithms used for system and partitions encryption making it immune to new developments in brute-force attacks. It also solves many vulnerabilities and security issues found in TrueCrypt. This enhanced security adds some delay ONLY to the opening of encrypted partitions without any performance impact to the application use phase. This is acceptable to the legitimate owner but it makes it much harder for an attacker to gain access to the encrypted data. All released files are PGP signed with key ID=0x54DDD393, available on key servers and downloadable at https://www.idrix.fr/VeraCrypt/VeraCrypt_PGP_public_key.asc VeraCrypt can mount TrueCrypt volumes. It also can convert them to VeraCrypt format. Documentation: https://veracrypt.codeplex.com/documentation FAQ : https://veracrypt.codeplex.com/wikipage?title=FAQ
[ Download VeraCrypt ]


Parrot Security OS

Parrot Security OS is a cloud friendly operating system designed for Pentesting, Computer Forensic, Reverse engineering, Hacking, Cloud pentesting, privacy/anonimity and cryptography. Based on Debian and developed by Frozenbox network.
[ Download Parrot Security OS ]


SynWrite add-ons

Collection of add-ons for SynWrite editor.
[ Download SynWrite add-ons ]


DisplayCAL

DisplayCAL (formerly known as dispcalGUI) is a graphical user interface for the display calibration and profiling tools of Argyll CMS, an open source color management system. Calibrate and characterize your display devices using one of the many supported measurement instruments, with support for multi-display setups and a variety of available settings like customizable whitepoint, luminance, tone response curve as well as the option to create accurate look-up-table ICC profiles as well as some proprietary 3D LUT formats. Check the accuracy of profiles and 3D LUTs via measurements.
[ Download DisplayCAL ]

Categories: Open Source

Open source down under: Linux.conf.au 2017

Google Open Source Blog - Sun, 01/08/2017 - 22:53
It’s a new year and open source enthusiasts from around the globe are preparing to gather at the edge of the world for Linux.conf.au 2017. Among those preparing are Googlers, including some of us from the Open Source Programs Office.

This year Linux.conf.au is returning to Hobart, the riverside capital of Tasmania, home of Australia’s famous Tasmanian devils, running five days between January 16 and 20.
Circle_DevilTuz.pngTuz, a Tasmanian devil sporting a penguin beak, is the Linux.conf.au mascot.
(Artwork by Tania Walker licensed under CC BY-SA.)The conference, which began in 1999 and is community organized, is well equipped to explore the theme, "the Future of Open Source," which is reflected in the program schedule and miniconfs.

You’ll find Googlers speaking (listed below) as well as participating in the hallway track. Don’t miss our Birds of a Feather session if you’re a student, educator, project maintainer, or otherwise interested in talking about outreach and student programs like Google Summer of Code and Google Code-in.

Monday, January 16th
12:20pm The Sound of Silencing by Julien Goodwin
1:20pm   An Open Programming Environment Inspired by Programming Games by Josh Deprez

Tuesday, January 17th
All day    Community Leadership Summit X at LCA

Wednesday, January 18th
2:15pm   Community Building Beyond the Black Stump by Josh Simmons

Thursday, January 19th
4:35pm   Using Python for creating hardware to record FOSS conferences! by Tim Ansell

Friday, January 20th
1:20pm   Linux meets Kubernetes by Vishnu Kannan

Not able to make it to the conference? Keynotes and sessions will be livestreamed, and you can always find the session recordings online after the event.

We’ll see you there!

By Josh Simmons, Open Source Programs Office
Categories: Open Source

Google Summer of Code 2016 wrap-up: Oppia

Google Open Source Blog - Fri, 01/06/2017 - 18:00
Google Summer of Code (GSoC) is an annual program that encourages university students to become open source contributors. This guest post is part of a series of blog posts from the open source projects and organizations that participated in GSoC 2016.

The Oppia project makes it easy for anyone to create lightweight, interactive online lessons that simulate personal tutoring. These activities, called “explorations,” can be shared with others around the world as standalone tutorials (such as Programming with Carla and Quadratic Equations), or embedded in websites to supplement an existing course (such as “Take Your Medicine” on edX and Computational Thinking for Educators).

2016 was Oppia’s first year participating in GSoC and it was a blast! More students flocked to our ideas page than we had expected, and our Gitter channel was full of people saying hello and looking for starter projects. Over the course of the summer, with the help of two capable and enthusiastic students, we were able to bring the following new features to the Oppia codebase:

A new creator dashboard -- Avijit Gupta


An important principle of Oppia is that lessons can be easily improved over time -- it’s hard to figure out all the possible ways a student can go wrong at the outset, but it’s much easier to respond appropriately to a new misconception that arises.

Each creator on Oppia has a “creator dashboard” which allows them to see the lessons they’ve created, as well as the feedback they’ve received from learners. Avijit completed a full revamp of this page, updating its design (for both desktop and mobile) and finding ways to display all the necessary information in an intuitive way so that creators can easily improve their lessons while getting feedback on their teaching.

The new creator dashboard.
In addition, Avijit added functionality allowing creators to view student misconceptions that were not well-addressed, to make it easier for them to improve the feedback for those answers. He has continued to help out with the Oppia open source project as a maintainer and reviewer, even after GSoC, and is mentoring other contributors who are working on further improvements to the creator dashboard. You can read more about the project in his GSoC writeup!

Speed improvements -- Vishal Gupta


In order to improve the accessibility of lessons for students with poor internet connectivity, Vishal’s project aimed to make Oppia speedier and less bandwidth-intensive. He started by implementing a performance testing framework to benchmark his efforts, and also integrated it with our continuous integration system in order to protect against performance regressions. He then turned his efforts to caching as many static resources as possible, implementing a cache slug system that causes new files to be downloaded only after a new release is made.

In addition, Vishal removed JavaScript code that was inlined in the main templates, and refactored it out into an external script which could then be cached for better performance. You can read more about this project in his post on the Oppia blog.

We’d like to extend our grateful thanks not only to Avijit and Vishal, but also to our many willing and enthusiastic mentors, and to Google for supporting our open source work with GSoC.

Join us in helping improve educational opportunities for students around the world. If you’d like to subscribe to news and updates about Oppia’s participation in GSoC, you can sign up to the oppia-gsoc-announce mailing list -- or, if you’re already feeling enthusiastic, you can start helping out with the project right away!

By Ben Henning and Sean Lip, Organization Administrators for Oppia
Categories: Open Source

January 2017, “Staff Pick” Project of the Month – antiX-Linux

SourceForge.net: Front page news - Fri, 01/06/2017 - 06:30

For our January “Staff Pick” Project of the Month, we selected antiX-Linux, a fast, lightweight and easy to install Linux live CD distribution based on Debian Testing for Intel-AMD x86 compatible systems.

antiX provides an environment suitable for new and old computers, giving old computers a fresh new feel. It can also be used as a fast-booting rescue cd. Its goal is to provide a light, but fully functional and flexible free operating system for both new and experienced users of Linux. It should run on most computers, ranging from 256MB old PIII systems with pre-configured swap to the latest powerful boxes.

256MB RAM is the recommended minimum for antiX, and the installer needs a minimum 2.7GB hard disk size. Special XFCE editions made in collaboration with the MEPIS Community are available. Currently, antiX-16 comes as a full distro (c695MB), a base distro (c510MB) and a core-libre distro (c190MB) for 32 bit and 64 bit computers.

[ Download antiX-Linux ]

Categories: Open Source

Announcing The Release Of repmgr 3.3

PostgreSQL News - Fri, 01/06/2017 - 01:00

Oxford, United Kingdom - January 6, 2017

2ndQuadrant is proud to announce the release of repmgr version 3.3, the popular tool for PostgreSQL failover since 2010.

repmgr 3.3 provides a number of usability improvements for the repmgr command line utility, particularly for the ‘standby clone’ and ‘standby register’ commands. These changes are primarily aimed at making repmgr easier to use when provisioning complex replication clusters.

repmgrd users should take note of the changes to repmgr logging behaviour.

From repmgr 3.3, support for the upcoming PostgreSQL 10 release will be provided as far as possible. PostgreSQL 10 is still under development with significant changes expected to the implementation of replication functionality; anyone wishing to test repmgr with PostgreSQL 10 should build from the repmgr master branch. Links

repmgr is an open source package that helps DBAs and System Administrators manage a cluster of PostgreSQL databases. By taking advantage of the Hot Standby capability introduced in PostgreSQL 9, repmgr greatly simplifies the process of setting up and managing databases with high availability and scalability requirements.

repmgr is distributed under GPL v3 and maintained by 2ndQuadrant.

Categories: Database, Open Source

Barman v2.1 Announced

PostgreSQL News - Thu, 01/05/2017 - 01:00

2ndQuadrant announces the release of Barman version 2.1, a Backup and Recovery Manager for PostgreSQL.

This minor release fixes a few bugs. It also introduces the --archive option to the switch-xlog command, in order to help users during the installation process of a new server.

For a complete list of changes, see the "Release Notes" section below.

Links Release notes
  • Add --archive and --archive-timeout options to switch-xlog command
  • Preliminary support for PostgreSQL 10 (#73)
  • Minor additions:
    • Add last archived WAL info to 'diagnose' output
    • Add start time and execution time to the output of 'delete' command
  • Minor bug fixes:
    • Return failure for 'get-wal' command on inactive server
    • Make 'streaming_archiver_names' and 'streaming_backup_name' options global (#57)
    • Fix rsync failures due to files truncated during transfer (#64)
    • Correctly handle compressed history files (#66)
    • Avoid de-referencing symlinks in 'pg_tblspc' when preparing recovery (#55)
    • Fix comparison of last archiving failure (#40, #58)
    • Avoid failing recovery if postgresql.conf is not writable (#68)
    • Fix output of 'replication-status' command (#56)
    • Exclude files from backups like pg_basebackup (#65, #72)
    • Exclude directories from other Postgres versions while copying tablespaces (#74)
Download About

Barman (Backup and Recovery Manager) is an open-source administration tool for disaster recovery of PostgreSQL servers written in Python. It allows your organisation to perform remote backups of multiple servers in business critical environments to reduce risk and help DBAs during the recovery phase.

Barman is distributed under GNU GPL 3 and maintained by 2ndQuadrant.

Categories: Database, Open Source

Web Application Security Testing Tools

DevX: Open Source Articles - Wed, 01/04/2017 - 22:05
It is important to test the security of your Web application before deploying it to the production environment. There are many tools that can help you speed up this process. This article provides an overview of the most widely used ones.
Categories: Open Source

Grumpy: Go running Python!

Google Open Source Blog - Wed, 01/04/2017 - 18:00
Google runs millions of lines of Python code. The front-end server that drives youtube.com and YouTube’s APIs is primarily written in Python, and it serves millions of requests per second! YouTube’s front-end runs on CPython 2.7, so we’ve put a ton of work into improving the runtime and adapting our application to work optimally within it. These efforts have borne a lot of fruit over the years, but we always run up against the same issue: it's very difficult to make concurrent workloads perform well on CPython.

To solve this problem, we investigated a number of other Python runtimes. Each had trade-offs and none solved the concurrency problem without introducing other issues.
MeatGrinder.png
So we asked ourselves a crazy question: What if we were to implement an alternative runtime optimized for real-time serving? Once we started going down the rabbit hole, Go seemed like an obvious choice of platform since its operational characteristics align well with our use case (e.g. lightweight threads). We wanted first class language interoperability and Go’s powerful runtime type reflection system made this straightforward. Python in Go felt very natural, and so Grumpy was born.

Grumpy is an experimental Python runtime for Go. It translates Python code into Go programs, and those transpiled programs run seamlessly within the Go runtime. We needed to support a large existing Python codebase, so it was important to have a high degree of compatibility with CPython (quirks and all). The goal is for Grumpy to be a drop-in replacement runtime for any pure-Python project.

Two design choices we made had big consequences. First, we decided to forgo support for C extension modules. This means that Grumpy cannot leverage the wealth of existing Python C extensions but it gave us a lot of flexibility to design an API and object representation that scales for parallel workloads. In particular, Grumpy has no global interpreter lock, and it leverages Go’s garbage collection for object lifetime management instead of counting references. We think Grumpy has the potential to scale more gracefully than CPython for many real world workloads. Results from Grumpy’s synthetic Fibonacci benchmark demonstrate some of this potential:



Second, Grumpy is not an interpreter. Grumpy programs are compiled and linked just like any other Go program. The downside is less development and deployment flexibility, but it offers several advantages. For one, it creates optimization opportunities at compile time via static program analysis. But the biggest advantage is that interoperability with Go code becomes very powerful and straightforward: Grumpy programs can import Go packages just like Python modules! For example, the Python snippet below uses Go’s standard net/http package to start a simple server:

from __go__.net.http import ListenAndServe, RedirectHandler

handler = RedirectHandler('http://github.com/google/grumpy', 303)
ListenAndServe('127.0.0.1:8080', handler)

We’re excited about the prospects for Grumpy. Although it’s still alpha software, most of the language constructs and many core built-in types work like you’d expect. There are still holes to fill — many built-in types are missing methods and attributes, built-in functions are absent and the standard library is virtually empty. If you find things that you wish were working, file an issue so we know what to prioritize. Or better yet, submit a pull request.

Stay Grumpy!

By Dylan Trotter, YouTube Engineering
Categories: Open Source

Rails Girls Summer of Code: Changing the face of tech

Google Open Source Blog - Wed, 01/04/2017 - 16:50
This is a guest post from Laura Gaetano who organizes Rails Girls Summer of Code, a global fellowship program inspired by Google Summer of Code.

Have you seen that picture of Margaret Hamilton, the NASA engineer who worked on the computer systems for the Apollo 11 launch? She’s standing next to the human-sized pile of listings of the Apollo Guidance Computer source code that she worked on. Do you know about Ada Lovelace, often cited as the very first computer programmer?

From World War II until the 1980s, women engineers and women computer operators were fairly common. There was a steady rise in women entering STEM fields, and young girls had role models and strong women to look up to. We're well acquainted with the drop in female engineering graduates worldwide after this time period, and the subsequent drop in the percentage of women entering the world of tech. We're here to help change that, and reverse the trend.

Rails Girls Summer of Code (RGSoC) aims to bring more diversity into the world of tech — specifically, into the world of open source software, where women make up a mere 11% of the community. The global program offers 3-month scholarships to teams of women to allow them to work full-time on an open source project of their choice – aided by local coaches and guided by the project maintainer (or a core contributor). The scholarships are funded through the support of the community as well as our sponsors, via a crowdfunding campaign.

Local vs. Global
We all cherish our local community and understand how strong of a support network it can be, especially for newcomers. The Rails Girls chapters worldwide emphasize that need: most coaches and organisers are local, and many alums go on to create their own study groups, or become coaches or organisers themselves. RGSoC also relies strongly on a global network of user groups — both Rails Girls chapters and similar organisations such as PyLadies or DjangoGirls.

Thanks to our connections with these different groups, we are able to reach people in remote or unlikely locations, and build the most diverse group of applicants possible. This is very important to us. Since the beginning, the program has provided the opportunity to bring together women with different experiences, backgrounds, locales and age groups to come together and be part of the same global initiative.

Our Structure
Last year, we received over 90 team applications. When applying, each two-person team chooses from a list of pre-selected projects. These projects are maintained by people we either personally know, or who have reached out to us prior to the application period. We look for projects with patient, open-minded contributors who are active in their community, and projects that provide a lot of learning opportunities for applicants.

Project maintainers (also called mentors) are in touch with students in order to adapt the roadmap throughout the summer to the students' needs and check up on their progress. On a daily basis, students spend the majority of their time with coaches. The coaches help, support, and teach the students throughout the summer. Each team is also appointed a supervisor, who supports students on the organisational side of things. They are the glue that keeps the whole team together, and a way for the core RGSoC team to keep track of how every team is doing.

Our Stats
Our program started in 2013 with 18 teams, 10 of which were sponsored and 8 of which were volunteer teams. The following year, 16 teams participated with 10 sponsored spots. The real breakthrough came in 2015 when we were able to fund 16 sponsored teams, a substantial increase from the previous years. Not only did this enable us to have more impact — with a potential 12 more women entering the tech world and STEM workforce than the previous years — but it also shows the community’s trust in the program.

In 2016, the Ruby community awarded us with a Ruby Hero Award, and we managed to collect enough money to sponsor 16 teams from five continents with another 4 teams joining as volunteers. This year was also the first time we had teams based in Uganda, Egypt, Singapore and the Czech Republic.
Our stats from 2016 (Image: Laura Gaetano/RGSoC)In 2015, we contacted our alums from 2013 and 2014 to find out what they were doing after the program. The responses were impressive: out of 64 graduates, over 90% are now currently working in the tech field. A fair number of graduates have even founded their own startup. Not only that some of these women have found their calling, but we might have made a small difference in the community of open source, and are on the right track to really shake things up.

Where do we go from here
On the first of July last year, we kicked off our program with over 130 people participating — including coaches, supervisors, designers, helpdesk coaches and project mentors. We were incredibly excited to have 20 teams in 16 cities and 11 different countries, spanning time zones, from UTC+10 to UTC-7.
Our 2016 sponsored and volunteer teams! (Image: Ana Sofia Pinho/RGSoC)We’ve seen in the past just how much of an impact we’ve had in our participants’ lives, and are hoping that this trend will continue to rise. We hope that some of our previous editions' teams graduated with the skills and confidence to become NASA engineers, web developers, or anything else they want to be. Hopefully someday they will become a young woman’s role model, and realise the important role they served in changing the future of engineering and of open source software.

By Laura Gaetano, Organizer of Rails Girls Summer of Code
Categories: Open Source

Projects of the Week, January 2, 2017

SourceForge.net: Front page news - Mon, 01/02/2017 - 23:51

Here are the featured projects for the week, which appear on the front page of SourceForge.net:

MediaPortal

MediaPortal turns your PC into a very advanced MediaCenter / HTPC. It allows you to listen to your favorite music & radio, watch and store your videos and DVDs, view, schedule and record live TV as a digital video recorder and much much more.
[ Download MediaPortal ]


Sky Chart / Cartes du Ciel

SkyChart is a software to draw chart of the night sky for the amateur astronomer from a bunch of stars and nebulae catalogs. See main web page for full download. This software is part of a full suite for astronomical observation: https://sourceforge.net/projects/ccdciel/ https://sourceforge.net/projects/indistarter/ https://sourceforge.net/projects/eqmodgui/ Requirement: https://sourceforge.net/projects/libpasastro/ See also: https://sourceforge.net/projects/indi/
[ Download Sky Chart / Cartes du Ciel ]


Alt-F

Alt-F provides a free alternative firmware for the DLINK DNS-320/320L/321/323/325/327L. Alt-F has Samba and NFS; supports ext2/3/4, VFAT, NTFS and ISO9660 filesystems; RAID 0, 1, 5 (with external USB disk) and JBOD; supports 2/3/4TB disks; rsync, ftp, sftp, ftps, ssh, lpd, DNS and DHCP servers, DDNS, fan and leds control, clean power up and down… and more. Alt-F also has a set of comprehensive administering web pages, you don’t need to use the command line to configure it. Besides the built-in software, Alt-F also supports additional packages on disk, including ffp packages, that you can install, update and uninstall using the administering web pages Alt-F is still beta and is being developed and tested on a DNS-323-rev-A1/B1, a DNS325-rev-A1, a DNS-320L-rev-A1 and on a DNS-327L-rev-A1 hardware boards. Other models and boards are said to work. Support Forum: http://groups.google.com/group/alt-f Homepage: http://sites.google.com/site/altfirmware
[ Download Alt-F ]


BluestarLinux

Bluestar Linux is an Arch Linux-based distribution, built with an understanding that people want and need a solid Operating System that provides a breadth of functionality and ease of use without sacrificing aesthetics. Bluestar is offered in three edtions – desktop, deskpro and developer – each tailored to address the needs of a variety of Linux users. Bluestar can be installed permanently as a robust and fully configurable operating system on a laptop or desktop system, or it can be run effectively as a live installer and supports the addition of persistent storage for those who choose not to perform a permanent installation. A Bluestar Linux software respository is also maintained in order to provide additional tools and applications when needed or requested. Bluestar provides the following features: Up-to-date Kernel Wide Variety of Applications – Always Current Versions Full Development / Desktop / Multimedia Environment
[ Download BluestarLinux ]


VICE

VICE is an emulator collection which emulates the C64, the C64-DTV, the C128, the VIC20, practically all PET models, the PLUS4 and the CBM-II (aka C610). It runs on Unix, MS-DOS, Win32, OS/2, Acorn RISC OS, BeOS, QNX 6.x, Amiga, GP2X or Mac OS X machines.
[ Download VICE ]


OpenFOAM+

[ Download OpenFOAM+ ]


SWIG

SWIG is a software development tool that connects programs written in C and C++ with a variety of high-level programming languages. SWIG is used with different types of target languages including common scripting languages such as Javascript, Perl, PHP, Python, Tcl and Ruby. The list of supported languages also includes non-scripting languages such as C#, Common Lisp (CLISP, Allegro CL, CFFI, UFFI), D, Go language, Java, Lua, Modula-3, OCAML, Octave, R and Scilab. Also several interpreted and compiled Scheme implementations (Guile, MzScheme/Racket, Chicken) are supported. SWIG is most commonly used to create high-level interpreted or compiled programming environments, user interfaces, and as a tool for testing and prototyping C/C++ software. SWIG is typically used to parse C/C++ interfaces and generate the ‘glue code’ required for the above target languages to call into the C/C++ code. SWIG can also export its parse tree in the form of XML and Lisp s-expressions.
[ Download SWIG ]


thumbapps

We believe that free/open source software is enough, we don’t need pirated softwares on Windows. But most of these aren’t portables, or provided by PortableApps.com due to .NET dependencies, 64-bit etc. So we provide what’s missing here. Software publisher who wishes their portablized software taken down, can tip us through thumbapps.org or versapps@gmail.com. We promise to take it down without questions, but please be patient—we might not be able to respond promptly, but we eventually *will* …thanks for your patience, and sorry for being such a #naughty uploader

Categories: Open Source

Survey: Is NetBeans IDE 8.2 Ready for Release?

NetBeans Highlights - Mon, 01/02/2017 - 21:16
The release candidate of NetBeans IDE 8.2 is available, with many bug fixes. Once you have downloaded and used NetBeans IDE 8.2 RC, we would like to know what you think about it. Take the NetBeans IDE 8.2 Community Acceptance Survey and tell us about your experience! The survey will be opened until September 28th. Thank you in advance for participating in the survey! Jiri Kovalsky NetBeans Community Manager
Categories: Java, Open Source

January 2017, “Community Choice” Project of the Month – Bodhi Linux

SourceForge.net: Front page news - Sun, 01/01/2017 - 06:25

For our January “Community Choice” Project of the Month, the community elected Bodhi Linux, a minimalist, enlightened Linux distribution. Project author Jeff Hoogland shared his thoughts about the project’s history, purpose, and direction.

SourceForge (SF): What made you start this project?
Jeff Hoogland (JH): When I was in college I started using the Enlightenment Desktop on all of my Linux computers. At the time there was no easy way to install Linux distributions that featured this desktop as their primary interface. In fact, many did not even have an up to date version of the desktop in their repositories.

This led to me regularly building E from source on my 4~ different computers I had at the time. Always looking to do things in an optimal manner I started creating my own packaged sets for the desktop and figured I might as well take the short bit of extra time required to spin up a live CD with said packages installed / configured nicely.

SF: Has the original vision been achieved?
JH: I think we accomplished our goal quite well. We aim to provide a fast / sleek user interface on top of the powerful and flexible Ubuntu base and that is exactly what we provide.

SF: Who can benefit the most from your project?
JH: Unlike many Linux distributions we are not targeting novice users with Bodhi Linux. People who are looking for an operating system that will get the most out of their system resources will enjoy using Bodhi. From systems that need something slim, all the way up to modern gaming systems Bodhi flies on computers of all speeds. Just because your computer has 16gigs of RAM doesn’t mean you want your operating system using a large portion of it. The less resources your interface occupies, the more resources your applications you care about have access to.

SF: What core need does Bodhi Linux fulfill?
JH: Bodhi fills a nice middle ground between Linux distributions like Ubuntu (that come with a bulky desktop and lots of pre-installed applications) and something like Arch Linux that starts you with just a command prompt. We are just about as minimal as a fully-functional operating system can be without requiring use of a command prompt.

SF: What’s the best way to get the most out of using Bodhi Linux?
JH: Using it as your operating system of course! And tweaking it to your heart’s content with all of our themes and extra modules.

SF: What has your project team done to help build and nurture your community?
JH: Responding to feedback in a timely manner is ideal for building a community. I am very active in our user forums. Even when I do not have an answer to a question I make sure to try and point users in the right direction to find proper help with their issue.

SF: Have you all found that more frequent releases helps build up your community of users?
JH: While more releases are good for exposure to your project, I do think “updates for the sake of updating” that many projects do today is silly. With Bodhi our version numbers have meaning – whenever our first version number increases you know there is an entire base change for the operating system.

SF: What was the first big thing that happened for your project?
JH: Getting recognition from the site DistroWatch jumped our traffic by a good deal. It’s the site many people use to search for Linux distributions based on different parameters.

SF: What helped make that happen?
JH: They list distributions once they have proven they are here to stay and are not just a flash in the pan. Having regular relevant updates and releases for several months got us this recognition.

SF: How has SourceForge and its tools helped your project reach that success?
JH: SourceForge provides something for free that most places do not – bandwidth. Our operating system is smaller than most, but our five release discs are at least 600MB each. Multiply this by the over 7000 downloads we see per week and you are looking at over 15 TB of bandwidth which SourceForge provides us per month.

SourceForge also does a good job of making the data I provide above readily available to me as a project owner.

SF: What is the next big thing for Bodhi Linux?
JH: The next major change we have planned for Bodhi is a rewrite of our desktop’s settings panel.

SF: How long do you think that will take?
JH: Since Bodhi is powered by volunteers our timelines are never firm. All of our code is written on a “as time permits” basis. Ideally our new settings panel will be ready for inclusion in Bodhi by default by the end of 2017.

SF: Do you have the resources you need to make that happen?
JH: Time is our only bottleneck. We have a team of dedicated folks though who are more than capable of getting the work done.

SF: If you had to do it over again, what would you do differently for Bodhi Linux?
JH: I would use consistent naming schemes from the start for our repositories. We bounced between “main” and “stable” and “testing” and “unstable” for various things. With our 4.0.0 release we standardized to “b4main” and “b4testing” which will then change to “b5main” and “b5testing” with our 5.0.0 release in 2018.

SF: Is there anything else we should know?
JH: Bodhi is a Live CD! This means you can load it up on a CD or a USB drive and give it a try on your computer without changing the contents of your hard drive. Give it a go and see how fast it is for yourself.

[ Download Bodhi Linux ]

Categories: Open Source

Top 10 Security Best Practices

DevX: Open Source Articles - Fri, 12/30/2016 - 22:37
Security is hard. It takes dedicated attention, knowledge and meticulous execution. It is also an ongoing process. It's important to educate stakeholders and clarify the state of security, the risks and mitigations. You need to be vigilant and on your toes.
Categories: Open Source

eMoflon

Date Created: Fri, 2016-12-30 08:43Date Updated: Mon, 2017-01-16 06:40Submitted by: Roland Kluge

eMoflon is a tool for building tools. It allows you to model software systems using a visual or a textual syntax, afterwards generating EMF-compliant Java code from your model.

Categories: Open Source

7 New Year’s Resolution Ideas for Open Source Project Developers

SourceForge.net: Front page news - Fri, 12/30/2016 - 06:16

It seems like only yesterday that 2016 begun and we were just about to see great changes happening with SourceForge. Now we’re at the end of it, readying ourselves for yet another year.

As fond as we are of the year that was, now is not just a time for remembering “Auld Lang Syne”, but also a time to prepare for what comes next. For open source project developers that means not only reflecting upon decisions and actions made, but also coming up with new resolutions that will define the future of open source projects.

If you’re currently handling an open source project and unsure of what these resolutions should be, here are a few suggestions for you:

  1. Mentor more. Investing in your team is investing in your project. When you put in the time and resources to help your team members become well-trained and experienced, you will no doubt see the positive effects on your project. Apart from mentoring your team members, encourage other, more experienced team members to be mentors as well. Create avenues for mentorship like meetings and lunches where new and interested developers can mingle with more experienced ones and learn from them.
  2. Continue your education. Just as with your team, investing in your own skills and knowledge is also investing in your project. Software development is continually changing, with new languages, frameworks and technologies emerging every year. Make sure you keep up with these changes by enrolling in online classes, or simply joining meetups. The more skills and knowledge you acquire, the more you can apply to the development of your project.
  3. Develop and refine your project metrics. These figures can show you what progress looks like for your project, and where to focus in order to better achieve your goals.
  4. Improve your documentation. Quality documentation is where all great contributions begin. This coming year, you could resolve to make yours more user-friendly and informative, and consequently encourage more people to contribute to the project.
  5. Find better ways to reach out to contributors. If you haven’t had much luck getting new contributors this year, then it may be high time to find new ways of reaching out to them in the coming year. Perhaps you need to be more vocal about needing help, and identify the specific areas where people can easily start making contributions. Or perhaps you need to vary your mediums of communication. Expressing your needs via social media or on a newsletter might just do the trick.
  6. Collect feedback- not only from users but from previous contributors as well. Find out why they stopped contributing, and if there are things you can do to make them eager to contribute again.
  7. Take a break. Perhaps you’ve been working too hard this year. If so, resolve to take some breaks in the coming year. Taking breaks can help you see the bigger picture, and spot important aspects of project development you may have missed. It also helps you to recharge. During these breaks you could choose to contribute to other projects, and by so doing learn something new and broaden your horizons. This can also help you to refocus and introduce you to a much needed change of pace.
Categories: Open Source

Dandelion

Date Created: Thu, 2016-12-29 16:05Date Updated: Tue, 2017-01-03 10:43Submitted by: Michael Bohn

Dandelion - Eclipse Lisp Plugin

A Eclipse plugin for Common Lisp development. Integrates various Common Lisp runtimes as plugins.
It is possible to integrate an arbitrary Lisp environment via the Preference settings in Eclipse.

Categories: Open Source