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Open Source

Projects of the Week, May 16, 2016

SourceForge.net: Front page news - Mon, 05/16/2016 - 05:06

Here are the featured projects for the week, which appear on the front page of SourceForge.net:

Linux Diagnostic Tools

Project’s goal is to create better tools for diagnosing Linux systems. Diagnostics include first failure data capture, error log analysis, preventative testing, and system inventory gathering.
[ Download Linux Diagnostic Tools ]


LibreCAD

LibreCAD is a fully comprehensive 2D CAD application that you can download and install for free. There is a large base of satisfied LibreCAD users worldwide, and it is available in more than 30 languages and for all major operating systems, including Microsoft Windows, Mac OS X and Linux, including Debian, Ubuntu, Fedora, Mandriva, Suse, etc. https://github.com/LibreCAD/LibreCAD http://forum.librecad.org/ http://wiki.librecad.org/ http://translate.librecad.org/
[ Download LibreCAD ]


simutrans

Simutrans is a cross-platform simulation game where players try to successfully manage transportation systems between places by land, air, and water for passengers, mail, and goods. Planes, ships, trains, trams, trucks, buses, or monorails are at your disposal, but factories operate based on contracts and passengers can only travel to their set destinations.
[ Download simutrans ]


arch-openrc

archopenrc provides OpenRC and eudev packages for Arch Linux and derivatives. For more details check out the links given below. Links ~~~~~ Wiki: https://wiki.manjaro.org/index.php?title=OpenRC,_an_alternative_to_systemd Github: https://github.com/manjaro/packages-openrc Installation guide: http://systemd-free.org/install.php
[ Download arch-openrc ]


FreeCAD

FreeCAD is a general purpose feature-based, parametric 3D modeler for CAD, MCAD, CAx, CAE and PLM, aimed directly at mechanical engineering and product design but also fits a wider range of uses in engineering, such as architecture or other engineering specialties. It is 100% Open Source and extremely modular, allowing for very advanced extension and customization. FreeCAD is based on OpenCasCade, a powerful geometry kernel, features an Open Inventor-compliant 3D scene representation model provided by the Coin 3D library, and a broad Python API. The interface is built with Qt. FreeCAD runs exactly the same way on Windows, Mac OSX and Linux platforms.
[ Download FreeCAD ]


Linux Lite

By producing an easy to use Linux based Operating System, we hope that people will discover just how simple it can be to use Linux Lite. Linux Lite is free for everyone to use and share, and suitable for people who are new to Linux or for people who want a lightweight environment that is also fully functional. Linux Lite is based on the Ubuntu LTS series giving you 5 years of support per major release. The following software is included: LibreOffice Suite, VLC Media Player, Firefox Web Browser, Thunderbird Email, Steam, Gimp Image Editor, Lite Control Center, Lite User Manager, Lite Software, Lite Tweaks, Lite Welcome, Lite Manual and more. https://www.linuxliteos.com/
[ Download Linux Lite ]


SparkyLinux

SparkyLinux is a GNU/Linux distribution created on the “testing” branch of Debian. It features customized lightweight desktops (like E19, LXDE and Openbox), multimedia plugins, selected sets of apps and own custom tools to ease different tasks. Sparky is in-between the distros that are beginner-friendly and those, that require some amount of Linux knowledge. Beginning Linux users are advised to consult the project forums regarding any issues or doubts.
[ Download SparkyLinux ]


fldigi

Fldigi is a modem program for most of the digital modes used by radio amateurs today: CW, PSK, MFSK, RTTY, Hell, DominoEX, Olivia, and Throb are all supported. It can help calibrate a sound card to a time signal and do frequency measurement tests.
[ Download fldigi ]


Vienna

Vienna is an open source Mac OSX RSS reader with support for RSS/Atom feeds, article storage and management via a SQLite database, written in Objective-C and Cocoa. Feeds can be accessed directly, or through a syncing service supporting the Open Reader API, like BazQux.com, FeedHQ.org, InoReader.com or TheOldReader.com. Development now happens on GitHub: https://github.com/ViennaRSS/vienna-rss
[ Download Vienna ]

Categories: Open Source

Eclipse Foundation Updates its Terms of Use & Privacy Policy

Eclipse News - Fri, 05/13/2016 - 20:20
The Eclipse Foundation has posted new versions of its website terms of use and privacy policy.
Categories: Open Source

Announcing SyntaxNet: The World’s Most Accurate Parser Goes Open Source

Google Open Source Blog - Fri, 05/13/2016 - 20:08
Originally posted on the Google Research Blog

By Slav Petrov, Senior Staff Research Scientist

At Google, we spend a lot of time thinking about how computer systems can read and understand human language in order to process it in intelligent ways. Today, we are excited to share the fruits of our research with the broader community by releasing SyntaxNet, an open-source neural network framework implemented in TensorFlow that provides a foundation for Natural Language Understanding (NLU) systems. Our release includes all the code needed to train new SyntaxNet models on your own data, as well as Parsey McParseface, an English parser that we have trained for you and that you can use to analyze English text.

Parsey McParseface is built on powerful machine learning algorithms that learn to analyze the linguistic structure of language, and that can explain the functional role of each word in a given sentence. Because Parsey McParseface is the most accurate such model in the world, we hope that it will be useful to developers and researchers interested in automatic extraction of information, translation, and other core applications of NLU.

How does SyntaxNet work?

SyntaxNet is a framework for what’s known in academic circles as a syntactic parser, which is a key first component in many NLU systems. Given a sentence as input, it tags each word with a part-of-speech (POS) tag that describes the word's syntactic function, and it determines the syntactic relationships between words in the sentence, represented in the dependency parse tree. These syntactic relationships are directly related to the underlying meaning of the sentence in question. To take a very simple example, consider the following dependency tree for Alice saw Bob:


This structure encodes that Alice and Bob are nouns and saw is a verb. The main verb saw is the root of the sentence and Alice is the subject (nsubj) of saw, while Bob is its direct object (dobj). As expected, Parsey McParseface analyzes this sentence correctly, but also understands the following more complex example:


This structure again encodes the fact that Alice and Bob are the subject and object respectively of saw, in addition that Alice is modified by a relative clause with the verb reading, that saw is modified by the temporal modifier yesterday, and so on. The grammatical relationships encoded in dependency structures allow us to easily recover the answers to various questions, for example whom did Alice see?, who saw Bob?, what had Alice been reading about? or when did Alice see Bob?.

Why is Parsing So Hard For Computers to Get Right?

One of the main problems that makes parsing so challenging is that human languages show remarkable levels of ambiguity. It is not uncommon for moderate length sentences - say 20 or 30 words in length - to have hundreds, thousands, or even tens of thousands of possible syntactic structures. A natural language parser must somehow search through all of these alternatives, and find the most plausible structure given the context. As a very simple example, the sentence Alice drove down the street in her car has at least two possible dependency parses:


The first corresponds to the (correct) interpretation where Alice is driving in her car; the second corresponds to the (absurd, but possible) interpretation where the street is located in her car. The ambiguity arises because the preposition in can either modify drove or street; this example is an instance of what is called prepositional phrase attachment ambiguity.

Humans do a remarkable job of dealing with ambiguity, almost to the point where the problem is unnoticeable; the challenge is for computers to do the same. Multiple ambiguities such as these in longer sentences conspire to give a combinatorial explosion in the number of possible structures for a sentence. Usually the vast majority of these structures are wildly implausible, but are nevertheless possible and must be somehow discarded by a parser.

SyntaxNet applies neural networks to the ambiguity problem. An input sentence is processed from left to right, with dependencies between words being incrementally added as each word in the sentence is considered. At each point in processing many decisions may be possible—due to ambiguity—and a neural network gives scores for competing decisions based on their plausibility. For this reason, it is very important to use beam search in the model. Instead of simply taking the first-best decision at each point, multiple partial hypotheses are kept at each step, with hypotheses only being discarded when there are several other higher-ranked hypotheses under consideration. An example of a left-to-right sequence of decisions that produces a simple parse is shown below for the sentence I booked a ticket to Google.
Furthermore, as described in our paper, it is critical to tightly integrate learning and search in order to achieve the highest prediction accuracy. Parsey McParseface and other SyntaxNet models are some of the most complex networks that we have trained with the TensorFlow framework at Google. Given some data from the Google supported Universal Treebanks project, you can train a parsing model on your own machine.

So How Accurate is Parsey McParseface?

On a standard benchmark consisting of randomly drawn English newswire sentences (the 20 year old Penn Treebank), Parsey McParseface recovers individual dependencies between words with over 94% accuracy, beating our own previous state-of-the-art results, which were already better than any previous approach. While there are no explicit studies in the literature about human performance, we know from our in-house annotation projects that linguists trained for this task agree in 96-97% of the cases. This suggests that we are approaching human performance—but only on well-formed text. Sentences drawn from the web are a lot harder to analyze, as we learned from the Google WebTreebank (released in 2011). Parsey McParseface achieves just over 90% of parse accuracy on this dataset.

While the accuracy is not perfect, it’s certainly high enough to be useful in many applications. The major source of errors at this point are examples such as the prepositional phrase attachment ambiguity described above, which require real world knowledge (e.g. that a street is not likely to be located in a car) and deep contextual reasoning. Machine learning (and in particular, neural networks) have made significant progress in resolving these ambiguities. But our work is still cut out for us: we would like to develop methods that can learn world knowledge and enable equal understanding of natural language across all languages and contexts.

To get started, see the SyntaxNet code and download the Parsey McParseface parser model. Happy parsing from the main developers, Chris Alberti, David Weiss, Daniel Andor, Michael Collins & Slav Petrov.
Categories: Open Source

The Evolution of Open Source

SourceForge.net: Front page news - Fri, 05/13/2016 - 05:15

For those who entered the IT industry in the late 2000s, open source software is part of the norm. For them, there isn’t a time when open source software was not free and available to everyone, and permeating through almost every facet of technology.

But those who have been with open source from the beginning know that such was not always the case. As open source stands at the brink of technological breakthroughs, we remember its past and look forward to its promising future.

Humble Beginnings
It’s unclear exactly when open sourcing truly began, but many would agree that it started way back in the ‘80s when software was free by default and sharing of code was widespread. It was during this time that Richard Stallman emerged and founded the free software movement, which brought the concept of open source out into the world and gave it the firm foundation on which it now stands. The movement saw the creation of the GNU Project and Free Software Foundation, but it was a struggle. Open source remained at the sidelines for most of this time, as proprietary software reigned supreme. For Stallman and his peers, establishing free and open source software was a moral crusade, and an uphill battle.

Growing Pains
By the 1990s to 2000s a new kind of movement emerged. Linus Torvalds created the Linux kernel and because of it, more people were able to use open source operating systems and improve them to a level that was competitive with proprietary platforms.

Unlike the programmers of Stallman’s time, Torvalds and his peers’ primary motivations for moving open source forward were not moral but functional. They viewed it as the more efficient way to code, and way less expensive than its proprietary counterparts. Despite this industry-aligned motivation and the developments that arose from it, open sourcing was still a much debated issue. Many a programmer had to battle with giants like Microsoft for using open source software.

Open Source Today
Fast forward to today and we can clearly see that open source is no longer an issue, it’s the norm. In fact, it’s steadily making its way into practically every area of technology, even creating job opportunities that were once non-existent. Its value is no longer questioned, it is widely known and embraced. It’s not just created by individuals sitting at the sidelines anymore, it’s created by large corporations too. And with plenty of developments still on the way, there’s no doubt that the scope and significance of open source can only increase.

The Future of Open Source
As of late, big corporations Yahoo, IBM, Facebook and even Microsoft have slowly but surely gone the open source route. These companies have each announced open source projects and plans, with a big chance of more to follow. There’s also been news of open source making its way into the Internet of Things courtesy of the Linux Foundation.

With the strides it’s been making, it seems clear that open source is headed somewhere good. And wherever this future may lead, you can be sure that SourceForge will be there to support all those who keep open source software thriving and evolving.

Categories: Open Source

PostgreSQL 9.5.3, 9.4.8, 9.3.13, 9.2.17 and 9.1.22 Released!

PostgreSQL News - Fri, 05/13/2016 - 01:00
2016-05-12 Cumulative Bug Fix Release

The PostgreSQL Global Development Group has released an update to all supported versions of our database system, including 9.5.3, 9.4.8, 9.3.13, 9.2.17 and 9.1.22. This release fixes a number of issues reported by users over the last two months. Most database administrators should plan to upgrade at the next available downtime, unless they have been affected directly by the fixed issues.

Bug Fixes and Improvements

This update fixes several problems which caused downtime for users, including:

  • Clearing the OpenSSL error queue before OpenSSL calls, preventing errors in SSL connections, particularly when using the Python, Ruby or PHP OpenSSL wrappers
  • Fixed the "failed to build N-way joins" planner error
  • Fixed incorrect handling of equivalence in multilevel nestloop query plans, which could emit rows which didn't match the WHERE clause.
  • Prevented two memory leaks with using GIN indexes, including a potential index corruption risk.

The release also includes many other bug fixes for reported issues, many of which affect all supported versions:

  • Fix corner-case parser failures occurring when operator_precedence_warning is turned on
  • Prevent possible misbehavior of TH, th, and Y,YYY format codes in to_timestamp()
  • Correct dumping of VIEWs and RULEs which use ANY (array) in a subselect
  • Disallow newlines in ALTER SYSTEM parameter values
  • Avoid possible misbehavior after failing to remove a tablespace symlink
  • Fix crash in logical decoding on alignment-picky platforms
  • Avoid repeated requests for feedback from receiver while shutting down walsender
  • Multiple fixes for pg_upgrade
  • Support building with Visual Studio 2015

This update also contains tzdata release 2016d, with updates for Russia, Venezuela, Kirov, and Tomsk.

Updating

All PostgreSQL update releases are cumulative. As with other minor releases, users are not required to dump and reload their database or use pg_upgrade in order to apply this update release; you may simply shut down PostgreSQL and update its binaries. Users who have skipped one or more update releases may need to run additional, post-update steps; please see the release notes for earlier versions for details.

Links:

Categories: Database, Open Source

PostgreSQL 9.5.3, 9.4.8, 9.3.13, 9.2.17 and 9.1.22 Released!

PostgreSQL News - Fri, 05/13/2016 - 01:00
2016-05-12 Cumulative Bug Fix Release

The PostgreSQL Global Development Group has released an update to all supported versions of our database system, including 9.5.3, 9.4.8, 9.3.13, 9.2.17 and 9.1.22. This release fixes a number of issues reported by users over the last two months. Most database administrators should plan to upgrade at the next available downtime, unless they have been affected directly by the fixed issues.

Bug Fixes and Improvements

This update fixes several problems which caused downtime for users, including:

  • Clearing the OpenSSL error queue before OpenSSL calls, preventing errors in SSL connections, particularly when using the Python, Ruby or PHP OpenSSL wrappers
  • Fixed the "failed to build N-way joins" planner error
  • Fixed incorrect handling of equivalence in multilevel nestloop query plans, which could emit rows which didn't match the WHERE clause.
  • Prevented two memory leaks with using GIN indexes, including a potential index corruption risk.

The release also includes many other bug fixes for reported issues, many of which affect all supported versions:

  • Fix corner-case parser failures occurring when operator_precedence_warning is turned on
  • Prevent possible misbehavior of TH, th, and Y,YYY format codes in to_timestamp()
  • Correct dumping of VIEWs and RULEs which use ANY (array) in a subselect
  • Disallow newlines in ALTER SYSTEM parameter values
  • Avoid possible misbehavior after failing to remove a tablespace symlink
  • Fix crash in logical decoding on alignment-picky platforms
  • Avoid repeated requests for feedback from receiver while shutting down walsender
  • Multiple fixes for pg_upgrade
  • Support building with Visual Studio 2015

This update also contains tzdata release 2016d, with updates for Russia, Venezuela, Kirov, and Tomsk.

Updating

All PostgreSQL update releases are cumulative. As with other minor releases, users are not required to dump and reload their database or use pg_upgrade in order to apply this update release; you may simply shut down PostgreSQL and update its binaries. Users who have skipped one or more update releases may need to run additional, post-update steps; please see the release notes for earlier versions for details.

Links:

Categories: Database, Open Source

Devit-JDT

Date Created: Thu, 2016-05-12 10:31Date Updated: Wed, 2016-05-18 16:18Submitted by: Lei XiaoBao

- Enchanted spell check support camelcased java variable method name。

A small patch on org.eclipse.jdt to support some feature needed by everybody.

feature

Patch default spelling engine to support check java package ,class ,method ,variable declaration and also support camel case. spelling support camel case
We can check:

package declaration(last segment)
class, method,parameter name
any variable
Note: We only check declaration part in order to minimum developer's attention. We ignore:

method with @Override
note Sine spelling checker can not get AST of java file. I have to use three regular expression pattern to match package,class name,method name and variable. So there maybe some performance problem if file is large.

some usefule code template for java
2.1 newlist,newmap,newset

type newlist and hit content assistant key (alt+/ or ctrl+space) and select newlist template and code will show:

newlist template

//newlist
List<T> V = new ArrayList<T>(10);
//newmap
Map<K, V> map = new HashMap<K, V>(10);
//newset
Set<K> set = new HashSet<K>(10);
//logger
//create static slf4j logger for class,and automatic import org.slf4j.Logger,org.slf4j.LoggerFactory
//test
//create @Test method,and automatic import org.junit.Assert.* ,org.hamcrest.Matchers

Categories: Open Source

NetBeans Plugin Portal and Bugzilla down for maintenance

NetBeans Highlights - Thu, 05/12/2016 - 09:08
Please be informed that NetBeans Bugzilla and NetBeans Plugin Portal are down for maintenance. We apologize for any inconvenience and thank you for your understanding. The NetBeans team
Categories: Java, Open Source

Hybrid Mobile Development with Cordova and Oracle JET

NetBeans Highlights - Thu, 05/12/2016 - 09:08
Oracle JET (oraclejet.org) is an enterprise JavaScript toolkit for mobile development. In this screencast, learn how to get started with it!
Categories: Java, Open Source

Trip Report: NetBeans Day India

NetBeans Highlights - Thu, 05/12/2016 - 09:08
NetBeans Day was held in India yesterday, on Saturday, 23 April, 2016. Hosted by the Hyderabad JUG, the event included a range of topics.
Categories: Java, Open Source

31 May 2016: NetBeans Day in London

NetBeans Highlights - Thu, 05/12/2016 - 09:08
Join NetBeans users all over the UK in London and learn about the latest NetBeans features while networking and getting to know others in this free event.
Categories: Java, Open Source

NetBeans Community Approves NetBeans IDE 8.1 for Release

NetBeans Highlights - Thu, 05/12/2016 - 09:08
We are pleased to announce the results of the NetBeans IDE 8.1 Community Acceptance Survey that ended November 2nd: 85% of 89 respondents agree that NetBeans IDE 8.1 Release Candidate is stable enough to be shipped! A few respondents pointed out several serious issues. We evaluated them all not to overlook some important problem. We have noticed that majority of web programmers appreciate improved generic support for JavaScript development like enhanced Node.js support, debugging, inspection and especially testing and packaging so our investment into this area paid off. Another success worth mentioning is big (98%) satisfaction with redesigned Java Profiler. Check it out yourselves! Overall, this is a good news for the NetBeans IDE 8.1 from the community, and we thank all who provided this valuable feedback!
Categories: Java, Open Source

Build with NetBeans IDE, Deploy to Oracle Java Cloud Service

NetBeans Highlights - Thu, 05/12/2016 - 09:08
Save time and effort deploying applications. Learn to set up Oracle Java Cloud Service, then install and use the Oracle Cloud plugin in the NetBeans IDE.
Categories: Java, Open Source

Build a Rich Client Platform To-Do Application in NetBeans IDE

NetBeans Highlights - Thu, 05/12/2016 - 09:08
Practice using NetBeans IDE features that improve code quality and increase developer productivity.
Categories: Java, Open Source

Video: Installing and Using Java ME SDK 8.0 Plugins in NetBeans IDE

NetBeans Highlights - Thu, 05/12/2016 - 09:08
This screencast demonstrates installation and usage of Oracle Java ME SDK 8.0 Plugins in NetBeans IDE on the Windows operating system.
Categories: Java, Open Source

LOEclipse

Date Created: Thu, 2016-05-12 02:11Date Updated: Wed, 2016-05-25 11:24Submitted by: Samuel Mehrbrodt

LibreOffice Eclipse plugin for extension development

To get started, check out the LibreOffice Starter Extension!

Categories: Open Source

PostgreSQL 9.6 Beta 1 Released

PostgreSQL News - Thu, 05/12/2016 - 01:00

The PostgreSQL Global Development Group announces today that the first beta release of PostgreSQL 9.6 is available for download. This release contains previews of all of the features which will be available in the final release of version 9.6, although some details will change before then. Users are encouraged to begin testing their applications against this latest release.

Major Features of 9.6

Version 9.6 includes significant changes and exciting enhancements including:

  • Parallel sequential scans, joins and aggregates
  • Support for consistent, read-scaling clusters through multiple synchronous standbys and "remote_apply" synchronous commit.
  • Full text search for phrases
  • postgres_fdw can now execute sorts, joins, UPDATEs and DELETEs on the remote server
  • Decreased autovacuum impact on big tables by avoiding "refreezing" old data.

In particular, parallel execution should bring a noticeable increase in performance to supported queries.

Help Test for Bugs

As with other major releases, the improvements in PostgreSQL include changes to large amounts of code. We count on you to test the altered version with your workloads and testing tools in order to find bugs and regressions before the release of PostgreSQL 9.6.0. In addition to testing that the new features work as documented, consider testing the following:

  • Do parallel queries actually improve performance for you?
  • Can you make parallel queries crash or lose data?
  • Do our code changes cause PostgreSQL to not function on your platform?
  • Does improved vacuum freezing safely reduce autovacuum of large tables?
  • Does phrase search return the results you expect?

Version 9.6 Beta 1 also makes changes to the binary backup API. Administrators should test version 9.6 with PostgreSQL backup tools, including pgBackRest, Barman, WAL-E, and other packaged and in-house software.

As this is a Beta, minor changes to database behaviors, feature details, and APIs are still possible. Your feedback and testing will help determine the final tweaks on the new features, so test soon. The quality of user testing helps determine when we can make a final release.

Beta Schedule

This is the first beta release of version 9.6. The PostgreSQL Project will release additional betas as required for testing, followed by one or more release candidates, until the final release in late 2016. For further information please see the Beta Testing page.

Links
Categories: Database, Open Source