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Open Source

NetBeans Day UK: Friday 29th May, 2015

NetBeans Highlights - 19 hours 55 min ago
Sign up today! The NetBeans Community invites you to a day of free sessions and workshops hosted at the historic University of Greenwich campus (London) on Friday, 29 May 2015.
Categories: Java, Open Source

Learn How to Develop Applications in the Cloud

NetBeans Highlights - 19 hours 55 min ago
In 5 minutes, learn how the Oracle Developer Cloud Service plugin lets you work in the Cloud to manage tasks, versions, builds and more all from NetBeans IDE.
Categories: Java, Open Source

Free Oracle Book: "Developing Applications with NetBeans IDE 8.0"

NetBeans Highlights - 19 hours 55 min ago
How much would you pay for a 600 page book about NetBeans IDE? Well, it is available for free, constituting all the help pages in NetBeans IDE, organized in helpful categories.
Categories: Java, Open Source

Build with NetBeans IDE, Deploy to Oracle Java Cloud Service

NetBeans Highlights - 19 hours 55 min ago
Save time and effort deploying applications. Learn to set up Oracle Java Cloud Service, then install and use the Oracle Cloud plugin in the NetBeans IDE.
Categories: Java, Open Source

Build a Rich Client Platform To-Do Application in NetBeans IDE

NetBeans Highlights - 19 hours 55 min ago
Practice using NetBeans IDE features that improve code quality and increase developer productivity.
Categories: Java, Open Source

Video: Installing and Using Java ME SDK 8.0 Plugins in NetBeans IDE

NetBeans Highlights - 19 hours 55 min ago
This screencast demonstrates installation and usage of Oracle Java ME SDK 8.0 Plugins in NetBeans IDE on the Windows operating system.
Categories: Java, Open Source

Google Code-in 2014 wrap up with OpenMRS

Google Open Source Blog - Fri, 03/27/2015 - 17:00
OpenMRS is a medical records system used around the world, especially in places where resources are scarce. It’s also being used with Google’s chlorine-submersible tablets designed for Médecins Sans Frontières to use while treating ebola patients. The OpenMRS community recently participated in Google Code-in, providing young students with an opportunity to get involved with real open source projects and learn about contributing to them. Chaitya Shah, one of OpenMRS’ two grand prize winners, shared this story with us about his participation in the contest.
GCI_2014_logo_small.png
For 7 weeks in December 2014 and January 2015, I worked with OpenMRS in the Google Code-in (GCI) competition. GCI introduces highschool aged kids to open source software development by providing a wide variety of tasks we can complete. For me, it has worked wonders. I’d been interested in the concept of open source software for about a year and even participated in GCI 2013, but this year, the experience turned my interest into a passion. I worked on many new things, met lots of new people, and learned several important skills along the way.

A few days before the competition started, I decided to see how OpenMRS’s software worked. I went through the GitHub repositories and tried to get openmrs-core, the main application, running. After a few tries and the help of several contributors on IRC, I was finally able to do so. Their help showed me what the OpenMRS community was truly about: everyone was very helpful throughout the contest and there was always someone online to help me out at any time of the day.
Several of the tasks I worked on this year were much more complex than the ones I worked on last year, giving me more of a challenge and motivating me to put forth my best effort! The early tasks, however, involved getting acquainted with the OpenMRS community and learning how things work in the organization. Several of these tasks taught some key aspects of open source software or of programming in general. One of the simplest but most important tasks was introducing myself to the community. If the communication between a developer and an organization is weak, the code produced will suffer. It was also inspiring to see so many other people interested in contributing to OpenMRS through GCI.
After learning the basics of OpenMRS, I started to explore tasks in the UI Revamp epic. With guidance from a mentor, I worked on making the OpenMRS ID site look more like the redesigned wireframes provided. These tasks really taught me a lot about design, one of my weak points. I used to know very little about HTML/CSS in general. The revamp tasks taught me about good practices in UI Design and I loved every minute of it.
In the last two weeks of the competition, I decided that I was ready to contribute something brand new to the organization. While deploying OpenMRS on the OpenShift cloud platform as part of a task, I found the developer guide was vague in some areas and difficult to follow. It took me a few days and some experimentation to get it working. To ensure that others wouldn’t have the same troubles, I made two videos showing the exact steps to follow: one for Windows and one for Unix-based systems.
After that, I decided to take on a Docker task. Docker is a system that lets you build, ship, and run distributable applications. This task directed me to create an image that downloads, sets up, and runs OpenMRS automatically. I was slightly overwhelmed at first, but Docker proved to be quite useful because it uses a system of containers rather than virtual machines, making it much faster and easier to deploy applications. I felt a big sense of accomplishment once I had finished publishing my work, writing up documentation, and making a quick video tutorial on how to set it up.
I learned a lot from OpenMRS and GCI this year. I was especially impacted by the weight that community interaction has in open source work. Previously, I’d always had the notion that being a programmer is very lonesome, sitting in a room with nothing but a computer for many hours at a time. However, I now know that everything in open source software development is collaborative; everyone works together to accomplish a single goal. I hope to someday find a job with a company that embraces this collaborative nature. Thank you to OpenMRS and GCI for an awesome experience this year!

By Chaitya Shah, GCI grand prize winner
Categories: Open Source

Less than a week to contribute your Great Fix for Mars

Eclipse News - Fri, 03/27/2015 - 16:21
The contributors with the best fixes will be awarded a new Nexus 9 tablet! Next deadline is April 1.
Categories: Open Source

Eclipse Newsletter - Eclipse in Automotive

Eclipse News - Thu, 03/26/2015 - 16:22
In this newsletter, you will find an article about Eclipse in Automotive and two articles focusing on Almathea4public and Artop.
Categories: Open Source

PostgreSQL Data Sync 15.3 released

PostgreSQL News - Thu, 03/26/2015 - 01:00

SQL Maestro Group announces the release of PostgreSQL Data Sync 15.3, a powerful and easy-to-use tool for PostgreSQL database contents comparison and synchronization.

The new version is immediately available at
http://www.sqlmaestro.com/products/postgresql/datasync/.

Top 5 new features:
  1. An ability to select or disable certain synchronization operations (Insert, Update, and Delete) has been implemented. The corresponding command line switches have been added as well.
  2. Now it is possible to specify SQL scripts to be executed before and/or after synchronizing data of each table.
  3. Synchronization script file name and log file name are now stored in the project file. These settings can be overwritten with the appropriate command line options.
  4. The first page of the wizard has been redesigned in order to provide more comfortable access to recently opened projects and display the latest company news.
  5. The progress windows are redesigned in the modern style and become more informative.

There are also some other useful things. Full press release is available at the SQL Maestro Group website.

Categories: Database, Open Source

Classp: a “classier” way to parse

Google Open Source Blog - Tue, 03/24/2015 - 17:00
If you’ve worked on compilers, translators, or other tools that need to read a programming language, chances are you’ve spent many painful hours detailing that language’s grammar. Recently, we opened up the source code for Classp, a side-project a few of us have been working on that demonstrates it’s possible to have an automatic parser generator that is not based on formal grammars. Instead of grammar productions, you write classes similar to C++ or Java and you write class patterns to define the syntax. Although there are libraries like Boost.Spirit and Scala Parsers that give you a nice way to write a grammar in the programming language itself, in the end you are still writing a grammar. Even though Classp looks a lot like C++ or Java, it is not just a C-like way to write a grammar. It’s an entirely different way to specify syntax.
Grammars are great for diagramming a complex syntactic structure for human readers, but as a computer specification, they leave a lot to be desired. Four key problems with grammars inspired us to work on Classp as an alternative.
First, a grammar is intended to represent the actual syntactic structure of the language: all of the little details like what goes first and what goes second, where to put your commas and semicolons, where can you substitute one thing for another, etc... But this surface structure doesn’t really matter to the programmer who wants to process the language. It just gets in the way. What you really care about are the logical parts of the declaration: what is the type? What is the name? Is there an initializer and what is it?
Second, many common parser generators don’t actually specify any tree at all. They let the programmer write actions to build up a parse tree. But the actions in most systems tend to form an awkward fit with the grammar.
Next, when you write a grammar, you have to worry not just about the surface structure of the language, but also about how the language will be parsed. You have to write the grammar around ambiguities in the language and sometimes around other features. You can’t just write the rules as you would write them for a human reader:
Expr ::= Int | ( Expr ) | Expr + Expr | Expr - Expr | Expr * Expr | Expr / Expr
instead, you have to write them in a way that avoids ambiguity:
Expr ::= Expr + Term | Expr - Term;Term ::= Term * Factor | Term / FactorFactor ::=  Int | ( Expr )
Finally, grammar-based parsers are extremely verbose. For serious parsing tasks, it is common to write a grammar, design a parse tree, write actions in the grammar to create the parse tree, design an abstract syntax tree, and write code to translate the parse tree into an abstract syntax tree. There are many dependencies among these parts that all have to be kept consistent over the life of the program. It’s a complex and error-prone process.
Classp attempts to avoid these problems. The abstract syntax tree is what programmers typically want to work with. With class patterns, you only have two jobs: design the abstract syntax tree and write a formatter for it. (A formatter is the function that writes out the abstract syntax tree in the target language.)
Here’s an example class declaration for an abstract syntax tree. The class pattern is the part inside the parentheses of the syntax statement: “arg1 '+' arg2”.
class Plus: Expression {  Expression arg1;  Expression arg2;  syntax(arg1 '+' arg2);}
This class pattern says that to print a Plus node, you first print arg1, then you print a plus sign, then you print arg2. So it looks like a nice formatting language, but where do we specify the parser? The answer is that we don’t specify a parser; Classp will invert the formatter to generate a parser for us. Since formatters are typically much easier to write and maintain than parsers, it almost feels like magic.
Classp is still a work in progress. We still have to deal with ambiguity in languages, features that are only output in one way but may be input in several ways, and a few other issues. But it’s ready to play with now and we’d love to hear from others interested in this subject. To learn more, visit http://google.github.io/classp.

By David Gudeman, Classp team
Categories: Open Source

Project of the Week, March 23, 2015

SourceForge.net: Front page news - Mon, 03/23/2015 - 06:08

Here are the featured projects for the week, which appear on the front page of SourceForge.net:


TYPO3

TYPO3 is an enterprise class Web CMS written in PHP/MySQL. It’s designed to be extended with custom written backend modules and frontend libraries for special functionality. It has very powerful integration of image manipulation.
[ Download TYPO3 ]


Tcl

Tool Command Language (Tcl) is an interpreted language and very portable interpreter for that language. Tcl is embeddable and extensible, and has been widely used since its creation in 1988 by John Ousterhout.
[ Download Tcl ]


Eclipse Tomcat Plugin

The Eclipse Tomcat Plugin provides simple integration of a tomcat servlet container for the development of java web applications. This project is a fork of the original Sysdeo Tomcat Plugin.
[ Download Eclipse Tomcat Plugin ]


Linux Lite

By producing an easy to use Linux based Operating System, we hope that people will discover just how simple it can be to use Linux Lite. Linux Lite is free for everyone to use and share, and suitable for people who are new to Linux or for people who want a lightweight environment that is also fully functional. Linux Lite is based on the Ubuntu LTS series giving you 5 years of support per major release. The following software is included: LibreOffice Suite, VLC Media Player, Firefox Web Browser, Thunderbird Email, Steam, Gimp Image Editor, Lite User Manager, Lite Software, Lite Cleaner, Lite Manual, and more.
[ Download Linux Lite ]


ZABBIX

ZABBIX is an enterprise-class open source distributed monitoring solution designed to monitor and track performance and availability of network servers, devices and other IT resources. It supports distributed and WEB monitoring, auto-discovery, and more. An enterprise-class distributed monitoring solution for networks and apps.
[ Download ZABBIX ]


K-Meleon

K-Meleon is a fast and customizable web browser that can be used instead of Internet Explorer on Windows. Powered by the same Gecko engine as the Firefox and Mozilla browsers, K-Meleon provides users with a secure browsing experience.
[ Download K-Meleon ]


DjVuLibre

DjVu is a web-centric format for distributing documents and images. DjVu was created at AT&T Labs-Research and later sold to LizardTech Inc. DjVuLibre is a GPL implementation of DjVu maintained by the original inventors of DjVu.
[ Download DjVuLibre ]


devkitPro

This project is for homebrew console development tools based on the gnu compiler collection with additional tools and libraries to aid programming each supported console. The windows variants are built with MinGW.
[ Download devkitPro ]


SMPlayer

SMPlayer is a free media player for Windows and Linux with built-in codecs that can also play and download Youtube videos. One of the most interesting features of SMPlayer is that it remembers the settings of all files you play. SMPlayer is a graphical user interface (GUI) for the award-winning MPlayer, which is capable of playing almost all known video and audio formats.
[ Download SMPlayer ]

Categories: Open Source

Mylyn Gitlab Connector

Date Created: March 22, 2015 - 10:41Date Updated: March 23, 2015 - 10:13Submitted by: Paul Weingardt

This connector allows you to connect the mylyn plugin in your eclipse installation to a Gitlab server.

Categories: Open Source

GSoC project Sambamba published in scientific journal

Google Open Source Blog - Fri, 03/20/2015 - 17:00
Student applications for this year’s Google Summer of Code (GSoC) are still open until March 27th. One of our goals with GSoC is to inspire young developers to participate in open source development, hopefully continuing well beyond the summer. Pjotr Prins from the Open Bioinformatics Foundation shared this story with us about a GSoC 2012 student who has continued leading the development of a software tool used in laboratories around the world. That tool, Sambamba, was recently featured in an Oxford University Press scientific journal.

The Open Bioinformatics Foundation (OBF) participated in Google Summer of Code (GSoC) in 2012 and again in 2014. One of our projects, Sambamba, enables users to rapidly process large sequence alignment files in the SAM, BAM and CRAM formats using parallel processing. Sambamba, which means “parallel” in Swahili, was recently the subject of a paper published in Bioinformatics Journal by GSoC alumnus Artem Tarasov. Since the tool is now used in DNA sequencing centres around the world, Artem has become well known in the bioinformatics community as Sambamba’s creator.
When we participated in GSoC 2012, we accepted five students, one of whom was Artem. His project was to “write the fastest parallelized BAM parser in D” as an alternative to the existing SAMtools software written in single-threaded C. I consider the D language to be particularly well-suited to bioinformatics given its modern hybrid OOP/functional syntax with close-to-the-metal performance optimizations.
Even before GSoC started that year, Artem was doing research and cranking out code. In his blog, he wrote about learning the D language, dealing with parallel executing code, and the sometimes-buggy compiler and garbage collector. The file formats he was working with are complicated and contain many assumptions, but he made wise choices which led to a very effective piece of software: people tend to rave about Sambamba when they use it the first time. Artem and I continued working on Sambamba after GSoC and before long, I found that he was the one mentoring me!
Since then, Artem has been invited to visit the Cuppen sequencing lab in the Netherlands where he added depth analysis to Sambamba. This is also when we started work on the manuscript for the Bioinformatics Journal. Later, the OBF was able to sponsor a second trip to the European Bioinformatics Institute in Cambridge, UK where he and I took part in a Codefest and met with other bioinformatics researchers and developers, including some OBF contributors.
Artem isn’t our only GSoC student who has continued making a difference in open source. Four of our five GSoC 2012 students are still active FOSS committers on GitHub, with three of them continuing in the bioinformatics space. Although GSoC can be competitive and we haven’t been accepted into the program every year, we’re grateful for the opportunities it has given us. Organizations like OBF and SciRuby are proof that GSoC and scientific projects work really well together. Without GSoC, Artem and I would probably not have ever met. He and I both hope to introduce more students to scientific open source projects in the future.

By Pjotr Prins, Sambamba GSoC Mentor
Categories: Open Source

Eclipse Community Awards 2015 - Winners

Eclipse News - Fri, 03/20/2015 - 16:45
Congratulations to the 2015 award winners!
Categories: Open Source

fos4cdt

Date Created: March 18, 2015 - 16:42Date Updated: March 19, 2015 - 09:24Submitted by: Dev Dev

fos4cdt is an Eclipse plugin to format C/C++ source files on any save action.
When you press Ctrl+S or click Save button, the plugin formats saved files automatically.
You can enable/disable auto formatting by a preference page and using shortcut keys.

Categories: Open Source

Google Summer of Code: Meet-up Round-up!

Google Open Source Blog - Wed, 03/18/2015 - 19:30
Over the past ten years, Google Summer of Code (GSoC) has given over 8,500 students a bridge into open source communities. GSoC alumni have played a large role in the program’s success by encouraging their fellow students to take part. Around the world, energetic students who have already participated in GSoC lead the way by hosting meet-up events that help others learn about the opportunities GSoC provides and get answers to their questions about the program. Who better than GSoC alumni to tell students what it’s really like spending the summer coding for open source projects?

Student applications for GSoC 2015 are open until March 27th, so the community has been spreading the word at school and beyond during the past few months. Here are just a few of the student-initiated events we’ve heard about recently.
Buea, Cameroon: 17 December 2014
Chris Nuvagda wanted to spread the word about GSoC after finishing his project, so he reached out to other GSoC alumni at the University of Buea to make it happen. Over 150 students attended the meet-up, with about 30% being women -- a number we’re happy to hear since only 10% of GSoC 2014 students were women and we’re trying to improve on that. The 5 presenters spoke about their experiences in GSoC and the benefits of it, gave advice on writing a great proposal, and shared what it’s like for women working in open source. Read more...


Delhi, India: 31 January 2015
Heena Mahour and Ayush Gupta hosted a meet-up for about 200 prospective students and open source enthusiasts. With help from others in their community, they organized a full-day event featuring 8 speakers. Students who previously participated with organizations like KDE, OWASP, and Mifos shared their experiences and answered questions from the audience. Technical topics were also discussed, including memory leaks and an introduction to version control systems. Read more...


Udine, Italy: 24 February 2015
Claudio Desideri spent GSoC 2014 coding for KDE and organized a meet-up for students at the University of Udine. With 80 attendees, there were just barely enough seats for everyone. Claudio shared his personal experiences but also learned that many students who might want to apply to GSoC fear being judged by potential mentors or failing out of the program. He helped reassure students that GSoC is an opportunity to grow and that they aren’t expected to already know everything. Read more...


Bangalore, India: 2 March 2015
With a desire to increase the participation of nearby colleges, especially among female students, Tejas Dharamsi and Rajath Kumar organized a GSoC meet-up at the Google Bangalore office. 102 students, including 44 women, from 11 colleges gathered to hear from the 6 speakers who shared details about the coding projects they worked on and gave practical advice for students applying to GSoC for the first time. The ending panel discussion gave attendees a chance to ask questions and offered students encouragement to apply for the program. Read more...


Kampala, Uganda: 12 March 2015
Organized by Kaweesi Joseph with help from OpenMRS, the organization he worked with during GSoC 2014, more than 110 students gathered for this meet-up. The 5 presenters discussed the benefits of contributing to open source, how students can participate in GSoC, and how OpenMRS is being used in Uganda. Read more...


We thank these GSoC alumni and many more who are spreading their enthusiasm for open source in their local communities. It’s because of local networking events like these that GSoC is able to have rich representation from all around the world. We look forward to welcoming some of these meet-up attendees into the upcoming Google Summer of Code 2015 -- don’t forget to apply before March 27th!

By Ashleigh Rentz, Open Source team, with thanks to everyone who allowed us to share their stories and photos here.
Categories: Open Source