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Open Source

How to Install and Configure Nginx Web Server

DevX: Open Source Articles - Mon, 08/03/2015 - 19:01
This tutorial discusses how to install and configure Nginx web server on a CentOS VPS and how to migrate from Apache to Nginx.
Categories: Open Source

Dojo Recap – Week Ending July 31, 2015

The Dojo Toolkit - Announcements - Mon, 08/03/2015 - 14:41

Each week we get a bit closer to Dojo 2. Let us know if you would like to get involved!

Last week in Dojo 2

We are currently focused on the packages in Dojo 2 platform, the replacement for the dojo package from Dojo 1. With Dojo 2, platform is a collection of ten packages (loader, core, dom, routing, crypto, class declaration, i18n, parser, io, and dstore) as outlined in the Dojo 2 roadmap.

With each package maintained as a separate GitHub repo, one of our goals for Dojo 2 is to make sure that each README package provides a very solid introduction to how each package works. For packages that are close to alpha completion (loader, core, dom), we have been spending extra time refining their README contents.

Last week we made progress on the following Dojo 2 packages:

Core

Overall, the core package is near alpha complete. Core contains APIs for feature detection, asynchronous and streaming operations, basic event handling, and making HTTP requests.

dstore

dstore is a recently released update to dojo/store. We are currently converting dstore to TypeScript for Dojo 2, as well as looking for areas to improve or streamline the dstore API. We are currently in the early stages of this conversion, with a few core modules converted thus far.

loader

The Dojo 2 loader is a minimal bootstrap for TypeScript and JavaScript libraries that loads modules in AMD, CJS, UMD, and eventually ES2015 formats. Unfortunately today it is not possible to handle all asynchronous ES2015 module loading scenarios without using eval, so we are currently focused on module formats that can securely run in all environments today. The loader is near alpha complete.

i18n

The Dojo 2 i18n package extends jQuery Globalize, a full-featured library that provides number, currency, date, and string localization. We are wrapping this capability with our preferred APIs and extensions for Dojo 2. We are in the early development stage with this package.

routing

The Dojo 2 routing module adds more features than the Dojo 1 router, including support for both hash change and HTML5 history APIs. We are currently working to refine the initial pull requests for routing.

dom

The dom package is considered near alpha complete. No changes or updates were made this week.

io

The io package today is mostly focused on server-side JavaScript IO operations. This package is in the API planning stages. No changes or updates were made this week.

parser

The parser package parses DOM representations into objects. This package is in the API planning stages, with a revised proposal currently under review.

class declaration

Class declaration is an approach to replace dojo/_base/declare. Given the need for something that will work well with both TypeScript and JavaScript, options for mixins and traits have been explored. We are currently working on a prototype using TypeScript decorators.

crypto

Dojo 2’s crypto API provides a cross-platform, user-friendly, extensible cryptographic API. It Initially includes a set of hashing and signing algorithms to support common use cases like OAuth and AWS request validation. We are currently reviewing our initial pull request for the crypto API.

This week’s Dojo 2 efforts

Here we’ve identified a few of our aspirations for the upcoming week. This week in Dojo 2, we have more code reviews to complete and pull requests to land. If you’re interested in helping out in these areas, or other parts of Dojo 2, just let us know, either in the comments or on IRC.

Core DOM
  • README updates
Routing Loader
  • Finish open reviews of API refinements, bugs, code style, and README updates
Crypto i18n dstore parser
  • Refine and update proposal
Weekly IRC meeting

As usual, our weekly IRC meeting is on irc.freenode.net #dojo-meeting at 9am Pacific time on Tuesday.

Last week, many of the key team members were out, so the meeting was skipped by most.

View the Dojo weekly meeting logs

This week’s agenda
  • 1.11 release plan
  • Discuss open 2.x challenges
Thanks!

The Dojo 2 loader, core, and dom are near an alpha state! Progress is being made on routing, crypto, i18, dstore, class delcaration and parser.Please let us know if you plan to work on any features, or would like to get involved, so we can collaborate.

Categories: Open Source, RIA

Project of the Week, August 3, 2015

SourceForge.net: Front page news - Mon, 08/03/2015 - 06:08

Here are the featured projects for the week, which appear on the front page of SourceForge.net:


OpenMediaVault

OpenMediaVault is the next generation network attached storage (NAS) solution, based on Debian Linux. It contains services like SSH, (S)FTP, SMB/CIFS, DAAP media server, RSync, BitTorrent client, and many more. Thanks to the modular design of the framework it can be enhanced via plugins. OpenMediaVault is primarily designed to be used in home environments or small home offices, but is not limited to those scenarios. It is a simple and easy to use, out-of-the-box solution, that will allow everyone to install and administrate a Network Attached Storage without deeper knowledge.
[ Download OpenMediaVault ]


Roundcube Webmail

Roundcube Webmail is a browser-based, multilingual IMAP client with an application-like user interface. Roundcube provides the full functionality you’d expect from an email client, including MIME support, address book, folder manipulation, message searching, and spell check. Roundcube is written in PHP and JavaScript.
[ Download Roundcube Webmail ]


PCRE

The Perl Compatible Regular Expressions (PCRE) library is a set of functions that implement regular expression pattern matching, using the same syntax and semantics as Perl 5. PCRE has its own native API, in addition to a set of POSIX compatible wrapper functions.
[ Download PCRE ]


FlacSquisher

FlacSquisher converts a library of Flac files to MP3, Opus, or Ogg Vorbis format, while maintaining the directory structure in the original library. That way, you can maintain your Flac files for home listening, and easily convert them to MP3, Opus, or Ogg format for mobile use, where storage space is more often tightly constrained.
[ Download FlacSquisher ]


Chromixium

Chromixium is a free and Open Source computer operating system, designed to mimic the look and feel of Google’s Chrome OS, but still retain the flexibility and power of Ubuntu Linux.
[ Download Chromixium ]


FileBot

FileBot is the ultimate tool for renaming your movies, TV shows,  anime, and music. It’s also great for downloading subtitles and artwork. FileBot is smart, streamlined for simplicity, and just works. FileBot supports Windows, Linux, and Mac, plus there’s a full-featured command-line interface for all sorts of automation.
[ Download FileBot ]


Cyberfox

Cyberfox is a Mozilla-based Internet browser, designed to take advantage of 64-bit architecture, but a 32-bit version is also available. The application provides a higher performance when navigating your favorite pages. Compatible With Windows 7 x64, and Windows 8/8.x OS.
[ Download Cyberfox ]


Password Safe

Password Safe is a password database utility. Users can keep their passwords securely encrypted on their computers. A single Safe Combination unlocks them all.
[ Download Password Safe ]


PlatformIO Storage

PlatformIO is a cross-platform code builder and the missing library manager, ready for embedded development, IDE and Continuous integration, and Arduino and MBED compatible. You have no need to install any IDE or compile any tool chains. PlatformIO has pre-built different development platforms, including compiler, debugger, uploader (for embedded boards), and many other useful tools. PlatformIO also has pre-configured settings for the most popular Embedded Boards. You have no need to specify in Project Configuration File type, frequency of MCU, or upload protocol. PlatformIO Library Manager allows you to organize external libraries. You can search for new libraries via the Command-Line or Web interfaces. Due to platformio lib update command you will also have up-to-date libraries.
[ Download PlatformIO Storage ]

Categories: Open Source

August 2015, “Community Choice” Project of the Month – NAS4Free

SourceForge.net: Front page news - Sat, 08/01/2015 - 06:08

For our August “Community Choice” Project of the Month, the community elected NAS4Free, an embedded Storage distribution for Windows, Mac, & UNIX-like systems. The NAS4Free Team shared their thoughts about the project’s history, purpose, and direction.

SourceForge (SF): Tell me about the NAS4Free project please.
NAS4Free Team: NAS4Free is designed to be a NAS (Network Attached Storage) system. Lots of systems drag in marginally connected services and try to make them more marketable to mass consumers, but instead make themselves very large or non-responsive. NAS4Free capitalizes on trying to do the few things it does in an expert manner. NAS4Free is the simplest and fastest way to create a centralized and easily accessible server for all kinds of data, with all kinds of network protocols, and across networks.

SF: What made you start this?
NAS4Free Team: NAS4Free started with FreeNAS in 2005. When the FreeNAS brand name was legally acquired by iXsystems in late 2011, it was necessary to carry on the project under another name. In March of 2012, we released NAS4Free’s first release. A good quantity of the base system was upgraded.

NAS4Free took FreeNAS from FreeBSD 7 to FreeBSD 9.x releases, allowing support for a lot of newer hardware and great advances in the ZFS file system. Also there was a strong demand from the community to keep this NAS OS going forward, as it itself has proven over so many years in the NAS world, and to end users.

SF: Has the original vision been achieved?
NAS4Free Team: Mostly yes. The goal was to continue the concepts and traditions of FreeNAS before the necessary name change. That core set of sensibilities has mostly been retained.

SF: Who can benefit the most from your project?
NAS4Free Team: The number of potential users is fairly limitless. A NAS works well for local (on the network) storage for media playback, VM hosting, and a number of other things in between.

SF: What core need does NAS4Free fulfill?
NAS4Free Team: Storage and file sharing. That’s the real goal.

SF: What’s the best way to get the most out of using NAS4Free?
NAS4Free Team: Don’t expect “extra” non-related NAS services. It isn’t a SQL server. It isn’t a Usenet downloader but installing it on a more modern machine, with some CPU power and enough RAM, will increase its performance greatly.

SF: What has your project team done to help build and nurture your community?
NAS4Free Team: The IRC channel is active and so is our forum. The Wiki sees updates fairly regularly. Previous support contributors have set up sites that help keep and retain useful questions and answers. Most of all, the project has generally stuck to the priorities and traditions that made FreeNAS so popular among its users.

SF: Have you all found that more frequent releases helps build up your community of users?
NAS4Free Team: Some users don’t care about frequent updates at all, they update now and then, and that’s OK. Others love seeing frequent updates because they’re curious about what has changed or want to keep their system fully updated, since some boxes are also connected to the Internet. It is a bit of a balancing act sometimes.

SF: What was the first big thing that happened for your project?
NAS4Free Team: The name change from FreeNAS to NAS4Free was pretty significant. All the new technology that the new version of FreeBSD pulled in made a giant jump from the old FreeNAS system. And setting up a new forum and all the webpages took some time, since most pages were setup from scratch or had to be rewritten.

SF: What helped make that happen?
NAS4Free Team: Bifurcation – a lot of developers either went to FreeNAS (with iXsystems) or quit entirely. That cut out a lot of the bureaucracy that occurs with projects that have a lot of developers. A lot of good ideas, many user driven, helped us make some great forward progress.

SF: What was the net result for that event?
NAS4Free Team: The core concepts and traditions were respected as much as possible. In the process, the total capabilities of the system jumped rapidly forward.

SF: What is the next big thing for NAS4Free?
NAS4Free Team: A number of good concepts and traditions are being adhered to and changing a lot of “big things” really isn’t something that is considered very often. However, with 32bit hardware rapidly expiring, 32bit builds will sooner or later be something that is phased out.

SF: How long do you think that will take?
NAS4Free Team: Expiring 32-bit builds could happen immediately, but we think that the 10.x versions are probably the last 32-bits versions we will make. The main 32-bit target (Netburst, Pentium4, and Celeron D) processors were replaced after 2007. We believe that 10 years is enough time to replace older machines.

SF: Do you have the resources you need to make that happen?
NAS4Free Team: Yes. It will actually save some resources and time for us not having to build 32-bit versions.

SF: If you had it to do over again, what would you do differently for NAS4Free
NAS4Free Team: If it were possible to change time, it would be nice to be able to keep the FreeNAS name. But, the name changes may have been serendipity, as it was a catalyst for change that may have been necessary at the time.

SF: Why?
NAS4Free Team: Keeping the FreeNAS name would have kept the whole community together. The past split fractured the community. Now there are plenty of anti-other zealots on both sides. But this is something we’ve tried to avoid.

SF: Any reason you can’t do that now?
NAS4Free Team: FreeNAS and NAS4Free are now represent different sides of the same coin in regard to how a NAS should work. Trying to rectify the two, and worse trying to rectify the communities that have clearly taken up sides, at this point is fairly impossible.

SF: Is there anything else we should know?
NAS4Free Team: Even with a little smaller user support base, we’ve found that sometimes the best ideas come from some of the least expected people.

[ Download NAS4Free ]

Categories: Open Source

August 2015, “Staff Pick” Project of the Month – JasperReports Server

SourceForge.net: Front page news - Sat, 08/01/2015 - 06:08

For our August “Staff Pick” Project of the Month, we selected JasperReports Server, a powerful, yet flexible, and lightweight reporting server. JasperReports Server’s product marketing manager, Ernesto Ongaro, shared his thoughts about the project’s history, purpose, and direction.

SF: Tell me about the JasperReports Server project please.
Ongaro: Jaspersoft’s projects have the ultimate goal of providing information to the right people in the right time and the right context. Although reporting started with boring paper-based products that only managers use, today everyone is using reports and visualizations in their day-to-day life.

JasperReports Server allows users to store, browse, and search visualizations and reports from a central repository; these features are useful to applications and enterprises that have hundreds of reports. JasperReports Server is centrally managed and can be used by an unlimited number of users. Role- and user-level security is integrated, allowing administrators to provide read/write access to users. This security even extends to within reports so, for example, a US executive will only see the data for their region in a global report. Reports can be scheduled and published in nine different formats to be delivered to specific people by e-mail, API, or FTP.

SF: What made you start this?
Ongaro: How JasperReports Server came about is an interesting story. Our most popular project in 2005 was a Java reporting Library called JasperReports, which won the SourceForge “Project of the Month” award exactly 10 years ago!

Java developers were embedding the library into all kinds of other Open Source and commercial projects. We noticed a trend; a lot of the developers were creating a repository to store reports, scheduling capability, user management, and APIs to access from other tools, so we thought we would build a product that encompassed these needs from our valuable community.

SF: Has the original vision been achieved?
Ongaro: Absolutely! It’s gone far beyond what the original architects ever envisioned. Originally JasperReports Server was a product that only dealt with reports; today it has expanded to support dashboards, Ad Hoc Reports, Metadata layers, REST APIs, and much more. The product has been downloaded millions of times and powers very important applications.

The way that we never envisioned the project pivoting was how people began to embed the product into their Web stacks to power the analytic needs of applications. Originally JasperReports Server was a project for traditional BI use; in other words, an internal audience of managers using reports to drive their business. Today it is a product that is used embedded into Web stacks; one such example is the Nagios spinoff, Incinga. We power the complex reports that give systems admins the intelligence they need; we never imagined casual audiences like this would use the tool.

SF: Who can benefit the most from your project?
Ongaro: In its current incarnation, the project is best suited with anyone that is building an application that could benefit from embedded reporting and analytics. Today’s applications gather a lot of data; how you present it to your end users is what ultimately can differentiate the application from others. Building this type of functionality from scratch isn’t easy or cheap; embedding JasperReports Server is a viable option to solve this complex problem. The community projects are great to start with for reports and the commercial editions of TIBCO Jaspersoft can help expand the use through more functionality and professional support.

SF: What’s the best way to get the most out of using JasperReports Server ?
Ongaro: There are so many interesting ways users have used the product it’s hard to say there is a “best way” – so one of the ways to make sure you are making the most out of JasperReports Server is to get engaged; watch some webinars, attend some local events, ask questions in the forum, or take some free or paid training.

SF: What has your project team done to help build and nurture your community?
Ongaro: Jaspersoft is one of the pioneers the single-vendor, commercial Open Source model. We have learned a lot over ten years. There are many times where had to listen to the community, the market, and changing technological changes to thrive.

The tools around the community have constantly evolved to support how our users engage; for example adopting a “voting” style forum which allows users to mark answers are read. A wiki was added in 2011 as well as a blog aggregation system. We have ran great community participation events and given awards to community members for outstanding work and contributions.

Today there are over 500,000 registered members of the community and it keeps growing!

SF: Have you all found that more frequent releases helps build up your community of users?
Ongaro: We find that a twice-per-year launch cycle works best for our users; the release cycles for their applications are most often around twice-per-year.

SF: What is the next big thing for JasperReports Server ?
Ongaro: The world keeps changing at an unprecedented speed; luckily we have great product visionaries on the teams that are driving innovation.

In 2010, when hardly anyone was talking about “big data” and “noSQL” we were already busy building connectors to Hadoop, MongoDB, and several other systems. Now they are an important part of our toolset and the market. We are committed to continue to support whatever is used in the future; weather the new data providers’ change their veracity, velocity, variety, or volume of data.

Deployment options also keep on changing. We used to maintain a simple download for the product. Today we offer Virtual Machines, Installers, WAR files, and Amazon AMIs. Also, in 2012 we were the first BI vendor to offer a PaaS deployment option. We also started offering pay-by-the-hour options on Amazon’s Marketplace. A deploy anywhere architecture is something we will keep on investing engineering cycles in; single platforms are not an option today.

There are also some neat cloud collaboration options coming down the pipeline as well as innovative new collaborative report feature we are excited about.

SF: If you had it to do over again, what would you do differently for JasperReports Server?
Ongaro: In 2005 it wasn’t obvious that Java was going to be as popular as it is today. The choices we made ten years ago were pretty good; today Java and Spring are kings for the back end. We’ve re-architected the product to be theme-able with CSS and modern Javascript frameworks drive events, so we continue to get a lot of mileage out of the architecture. Luckily there isn’t a single big product choice we made that we could regret; it’s been quite a ride!

[ Download JasperReports Server ]

Categories: Open Source

SourceForge Infrastructure and Service Restoration update for 7/31

SourceForge.net: Front page news - Sat, 08/01/2015 - 00:39

On 7/16, Slashdot Media sites (including Slashdot and SourceForge) experienced a storage fault. Work has continued 24×7 on service restoration. Updates have been provided as each key service component was restored. We’ve provided four prior updates (7/18, 7/22, 7/24, 7/28) summarizing our infrastructure and service restoration status. This is our fifth and final large update for this incident.

As of 7/31, all Slashdot Media sites and services have been restored.

Activity since our 7/28 full update:

  • SourceForge file upload capability was restored to service on 7/31, matching our announced ETA.
  • SourceForge CVS service, non-Allura-backed Bazaar (bzr) SCM service, and interactive shell service were restored on 7/31, ahead of our announced ETA.

SourceForge staff will continue to monitor and respond to the support ticket queue.  If you are in need of support, please submit a ticket at: https://sourceforge.net/p/forge/site-support/new/

Root cause analysis (RCA) for this incident has been formed.  Slashdot Media teams will continue to meet next week to complete preparation of recommendations and post-mortem documentation.  Additional information to be provided to the community via this blog.

Thank you for your continued support and patience.

Categories: Open Source

cstore_fdw 1.3 Release for Columnar Store PostgreSQL

PostgreSQL News - Fri, 07/31/2015 - 01:00

cstore_fdw is an open source columnar store extension which reduces the data storage footprint and disk I/O for PostgreSQL databases. The version 1.3 release of cstore_fdw is now available at github.com/citusdata/cstore_fdw. Release notes are available on the Citus Data blog.

Categories: Database, Open Source

pg_shard 1.2 Released for Scaling Out PostgreSQL

PostgreSQL News - Fri, 07/31/2015 - 01:00

pg-shard is an open source extension for sharding and scaling out PostgreSQL across a cluster of high availability servers. The version 1.2 release is now available for download on the Citus Data pg-shard GitHub page.

Categories: Database, Open Source

Introducing SourceForge’s new markdown text editor

SourceForge.net: Front page news - Thu, 07/30/2015 - 23:13

Sometimes small things make all the difference and that’s why we are happy to release a new markdown text editor on SourceForge. What this means is that when you create a ticket, edit a wiki page, or comment on a post on SourceForge you find it that much easier to format your text.  Our new text editor includes a toolbar to insert formatting and live syntax highlighting, so you can see what you’re doing while you edit.

Here’s what it looks like:

Markdown text editor screenshot

Note that the toolbar functions do the most of the common formatting so you don’t have to remember the syntax; however, the toolbar contains just the essential options. The full list of formatting and macro options are available by clicking the “?” – Help button. You’ll find that markdown supports lots of formatting, and we’ve taken care to extend it with additional linking and macro options too.

In the area where you type, there is live syntax highlighting of most formatting. This gives useful indicators of what formatting is being applied and it also helps you avoid accidental formatting. To see a full preview of your text, click the preview button (eyeball icon).

A special thank you to the Open Source Apache Allura platform folks. SourceForge developer tools run on Apache Allura and that’s where this improvement came from. Read all about it at: http://allura.apache.org/posts/2015-markdown-editor.html

That’s it for now. Happy editing!

Categories: Open Source

Introducing SourceForge’s new markdown text editor

SourceForge.net: Front page news - Thu, 07/30/2015 - 23:13

Sometimes small things make all the difference and that’s why we are happy to release a new markdown text editor on SourceForge. What this means is that when you create a ticket, edit a wiki page, or comment on a post on SourceForge you find it that much easier to format your text.  Our new text editor includes a toolbar to insert formatting and live syntax highlighting, so you can see what you’re doing while you edit.

Here’s what it looks like:

Markdown text editor screenshot

Note that the toolbar functions do the most of the common formatting so you don’t have to remember the syntax; however, the toolbar contains just the essential options. The full list of formatting and macro options are available by clicking the “?” – Help button. You’ll find that markdown supports lots of formatting, and we’ve taken care to extend it with additional linking and macro options too.

In the area where you type, there is live syntax highlighting of most formatting. This gives useful indicators of what formatting is being applied and it also helps you avoid accidental formatting. To see a full preview of your text, click the preview button (eyeball icon).

A special thank you to the Open Source Apache Allura platform folks. SourceForge developer tools run on Apache Allura and that’s where this improvement came from. Read all about it at: http://allura.apache.org/posts/2015-markdown-editor.html

That’s it for now. Happy editing!

Categories: Open Source

Flow Visual Debugger

Date Created: July 30, 2015 - 14:47Date Updated: August 4, 2015 - 04:58Submitted by: Yiquan Zhou

Flow Visual Debugger is an Eclipse plugin to show you what your Java program does.
It's highly visual. The execution of programs is visualized as a graph. You can save and share graphs as a mean to document or explain parts of a program.
It enables reversible debuggin. Debug sessions are recorded and can be replayed any time. This means you can debug forward, but also back in time. You no longer need to launch multiple sessions to narrow down a bug.
Variable values are represented in a more concise and expressive form than in Eclipse.
For more details, please visit http://findtheflow.io

Categories: Open Source

SourceForge Infrastructure and Service Restoration update for 7/28

SourceForge.net: Front page news - Wed, 07/29/2015 - 20:01

On 7/16, Slashdot Media sites (including Slashdot and SourceForge) experienced a storage fault. Work has continued 24×7 on service restoration. Updates have been provided as each key service component was restored. We’ve provided two prior updates (7/18, 7/22, 7/24) summarizing our infrastructure and service restoration status. This is our fourth large update.

The format for this update has changed. Since we are well-past the 50% mark on service restoration, we will be providing updates only on service outages mitigated since 7/24 and ETA detail on outstanding service outages.

All services except SourceForge Developer Services were fully restored on or before 7/24. Services are online except those listed here as outstanding. For full service listing, see our 7/24 update.

Recently restored

  • Project Web service for k* projects is back online.
  • Allura-backed Subversion service is online
  • Classic (non-Allura) Git service is online.
  • Classic (non-Allura) Subversion (SVN) service is online.
  • Classic (non-Allura) Mercurial (Hg) service is online.

Outstanding

  • File upload service data has been reconstructed and is pending final copying, ETA for service restoration is end of day 7/31.
  • Classic (non-Allura) Bzr service is pending data validation. ETA for service restoration is end of day 8/3. Dataset is undergoing analysis, particularly to identify previously-migrated repositories.
  • CVS service data is pending validation, and infrastructure is being brought back online. ETA for service restoration is end of day 8/3. Data analysis is in-progress, to be followed by restore.  Validation of CVS data requires a greater degree of manual validation than other SCMs.
  • Interactive shell service is offline pending availability of all other service data. This service will be the last to come online. ETA for service restoration is end of day 8/3.

Additional notes

  • Targeted communications were sent to projects using Allura-backed Subversion service where we were able to identify commits occurred between time of backup and time of incident.  These projects were supplied commit metadata (committer, date, commit message) to aid in re-capture of these changes.
  • Post-mortem activity is anticipated after data restoration is completed.
  • Scheduled (and pre-announced) downtime of Developer Services occurred on 7/28 to support maintenance on our NFS servers. This downtime was completed successfully and ahead of schedule.
  • One additional Ceph-backed database is being migrated to the recently-provisioned SSD-backed database cluster.
  • Additional storage has been onboarded to support service restoration activities. In some cases we currently have three copies of production data to maintain during restoration.
  • Users on “Classic” non-Allura-backed SCM services should anticipate an upcoming pre-announced migration to Allura-backed service (which was restored first).

Work continues 24×7. Thank you for your continued support and patience.

Categories: Open Source

Keynote Speakers Announced for the 10th EclipseCon Europe Conference

Eclipse News - Wed, 07/29/2015 - 15:00
Join us November 3-5, 2015 at the Forum am Schlosspark in Ludwigsburg, Germany.
Categories: Open Source

Truly Unleashing the Power of Maven and Java EE | Java Code Geeks

NetBeans Highlights - Wed, 07/29/2015 - 12:19
While Maven and Java EE are technologies that are well established throughout the Java industry, it can be extremely tricky to get started with them.
Categories: Java, Open Source

New Book: Beginning Java with NetBeans

NetBeans Highlights - Wed, 07/29/2015 - 12:19
We’ve designed Murach’s Beginning Java with NetBeans specifically for beginning programmers and programmers with limited experience who want to learn Java at a professional level.
Categories: Java, Open Source

Trip Report: NetBeans Day Brasil

NetBeans Highlights - Wed, 07/29/2015 - 12:19
The first NetBeans Day Brasil ever was held on Monday 22 June 2015 in the Oracle office in Sao Paolo.
Categories: Java, Open Source

Build with NetBeans IDE, Deploy to Oracle Java Cloud Service

NetBeans Highlights - Wed, 07/29/2015 - 12:19
Save time and effort deploying applications. Learn to set up Oracle Java Cloud Service, then install and use the Oracle Cloud plugin in the NetBeans IDE.
Categories: Java, Open Source

Build a Rich Client Platform To-Do Application in NetBeans IDE

NetBeans Highlights - Wed, 07/29/2015 - 12:19
Practice using NetBeans IDE features that improve code quality and increase developer productivity.
Categories: Java, Open Source

Video: Installing and Using Java ME SDK 8.0 Plugins in NetBeans IDE

NetBeans Highlights - Wed, 07/29/2015 - 12:19
This screencast demonstrates installation and usage of Oracle Java ME SDK 8.0 Plugins in NetBeans IDE on the Windows operating system.
Categories: Java, Open Source