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Open Source

The latest round of Google Open Source Peer Bonus winners

Google Open Source Blog - 2 hours 52 min ago
Google relies on open source software throughout our systems, much of it written by non-Googlers. We’re always looking for ways to say “thank you!” so 5 years ago we started asking Googlers to nominate open source contributors outside of the company who have made significant contributions to codebases we use or think are important. We’ve recognized more than 500 developers from 30+ countries who have contributed their time and talent to over 400 open source projects since the program’s inception in 2011.

Today we are pleased to announce the latest round of awardees, 52 individuals we’d like to recognize for their dedication to open source communities. The following is a list of everyone who gave us permission to thank them publicly:

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Name Project Name Project Philipp Hancke Adapter.js Fernando Perez Jupyter & IPython Geoff Greer Ag Michelle Noorali Kubernetes & Helm Dzmitry Shylovich Angular Prosper Otemuyiwa Laravel Hackathon Starter David Kalnischkies Apt Keith Busch Linux kernel Peter Mounce Bazel Thomas Caswell matplotlib Yuki Yugui Sonoda Bazel Tatsuhiro Tsujikawa nghttp2 Eric Fiselier benchmark Anna Henningsen Node.js Rob Stradling Certificate Transparency Charles Harris NumPy Ke He Chromium Jeff Reback pandas Daniel Micay CopperheadOS Ludovic Rousseau PCSC-Lite, CCID Nico Huber coreboot Matti Picus PyPy Kyösti Mälkki coreboot Salvatore Sanfilippo Redis Jana Moudrá Dart Ralf Gommers SciPy John Wiegley Emacs Kevin O'Connor SeaBIOS Alex Saveau FirebaseUI-Android Sam Aaron Sonic Pi Toke Hoiland-Jorgensen Flent Michael Tyson The Amazing Audio Engine Hanno Böck Fuzzing Project Rob Landley Toybox Luca Milanesio Gerrit Bin Meng U-Boot Daniel Theophanes Go programming language Ben Noordhuis V8 Josh Snyder Go programming language Fatih Arslan vim-go Brendan Tracey Go programming language Adam Treat WebKit Elias Naur Go on Mobile Chris Dumez WebKit Anthonios Partheniou Google Cloud Datalab Sean Larkin Webpack Marcus Meissner gPhoto2 Tobias Koppers Webpack Matt Butcher Helm Alexis La Goutte Wireshark dissector for QUIC
Congratulations to all of the awardees, past and present! Thank you for your contributions.

By Helen Hu, Open Source Programs Office
Categories: Open Source

Projects of the Week, March 27, 2017

SourceForge.net: Front page news - Mon, 03/27/2017 - 05:25

Here are the featured projects for the week, which appear on the front page of SourceForge.net:

Otter Browser

[ Download Otter Browser ]


Cyberfox Portable Edition

Cyberfox Portable Edition (PortableApp.com Ready!) The Famous Portable Apps Collection Just Got Better With Cyberfox Portable powered by Mozilla Firefox source code. Compatible Windows Operating Systems: Windows 7/7 SP1 OS x86|x64 Windows 8/8.x OS x86|x64 Windows 10 OS x86|x64 (Windows XP Unsupported, Windows Vista Unsupported) Dedicated support forums. https://8pecxstudios.com/Forums/index.php Dedicated Contact Forms. https://cyberfox.8pecxstudios.com/contact-us Portable Updater: https://8pecxstudios.com/Forums/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=725 See notifications for critical release information: https://cyberfox.8pecxstudios.com/notifications Tell us what you think and write a review. https://8pecxstudios.com/Forums/viewforum.php?f=9 Thank you for your support. Future direction of project https://8pecxstudios.com/Forums/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=1756
[ Download Cyberfox Portable Edition ]


PINN

PINN is an enhancement of NOOBS for the Raspberry Pi. It also permits installation of Arch Linux, OpenElec and Retropie through the familiar NOOBS-like interface.
[ Download PINN ]


jEdit

jEdit is a programmer’s text editor written in Java. It uses the Swing toolkit for the GUI and can be configured as a rather powerful IDE through the use of its plugin architecture.
[ Download jEdit ]


Jmol

Over 10,000,000 page views! Jmol/JSmol is a molecular viewer for 3D chemical structures that runs in four independent modes: an HTML5-only web application utilizing jQuery, a Java applet, a stand-alone Java program (Jmol.jar), and a “headless” server-side component (JmolData.jar). Jmol can read many file types, including PDB, CIF, SDF, MOL, PyMOL PSE files, and Spartan files, as well as output from Gaussian, GAMESS, MOPAC, VASP, CRYSTAL, CASTEP, QuantumEspresso, VMD, and many other quantum chemistry programs. Files can be transferred directly from several databases, including RCSB, EDS, NCI, PubChem, and MaterialsProject. Multiple files can be loaded and compared. A rich scripting language and a well-developed web API allow easy customization of the user interface. Features include interactive animation and linear morphing. Jmol interfaces well with JSpecView for spectroscopy, JSME for 2D->3D conversion, POV-Ray for images, and CAD programs for 3D printing (VRML export).
[ Download Jmol ]


Sky Chart / Cartes du Ciel

SkyChart is a software to draw chart of the night sky for the amateur astronomer from a bunch of stars and nebulae catalogs. See main web page for full download. This software is part of a full suite for astronomical observation: https://sourceforge.net/projects/ccdciel/ https://sourceforge.net/projects/indistarter/ https://sourceforge.net/projects/eqmodgui/ Requirement: https://sourceforge.net/projects/libpasastro/ See also: https://sourceforge.net/projects/indi/
[ Download Sky Chart / Cartes du Ciel ]


DisplayCAL

DisplayCAL (formerly known as dispcalGUI) is a graphical user interface for the display calibration and profiling tools of Argyll CMS, an open source color management system. Calibrate and characterize your display devices using one of the many supported measurement instruments, with support for multi-display setups and a variety of available settings like customizable whitepoint, luminance, tone response curve as well as the option to create accurate look-up-table ICC profiles as well as some proprietary 3D LUT formats. Check the accuracy of profiles and 3D LUTs via measurements.
[ Download DisplayCAL ]


Emmabuntüs

Emmabuntüs is a desktop GNU/Linux distribution, first based on the Long Term Support versions of Xubuntu, and is now based on Debian Stable on XFCE, made specifically for refurbished computers destined for humanitarian organisations, and to promote the discovery of GNU/Linux by beginners, as well as to extend the lifespan of hardware and to reduce over consumption & waste in electronics.
It strives to be beginner-friendly and reasonably light on resources so that it can be used on older computers. It also includes many modern features, such as a large number of pre-configured programs for everyday use, dockbar for launching applications, easy installation of non-free software and media codecs, and quick setup through automated scripts.
The distribution supports English, French, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, German languages.
Newspapers reviews : http://en.newspapers.emmabuntus.org
All international reviews: http://distrowatch.com/table.php?distribution=emmabuntus
[ Download Emmabuntüs ]


d3 D3.js

D3.js (or D3 for Data-Driven Documents) is a JavaScript library that allows you to produce dynamic, interactive data visualizations in web browsers. With D3 you can bring data to life using SVG, Canvas and HTML. Powerful visualization and interaction techniques plus a data-driven approach to DOM manipulation means D3.js gives you greater design freedom and control over the final result.
[ Download D3.js ]

Categories: Open Source

29 April 2017: NetBeans Day India

NetBeans Highlights - Sat, 03/25/2017 - 05:39
Join the NetBeans community in Bangalore to learn about the latest developments in Java and JavaScript.
Categories: Java, Open Source

25 April 2017: NetBeans Day UK

NetBeans Highlights - Sat, 03/25/2017 - 05:39
We are very pleased to announce that the third NetBeans Day UK will be on tuesday 25th April. Our friends at University of Greenwich will again be hosting us.
Categories: Java, Open Source

21 April 2017: NetBeans Day Greece

NetBeans Highlights - Sat, 03/25/2017 - 05:39
This is an exciting time as NetBeans is migrating Apache. To learn more about this movement and the latest news regarding NetBeans, with UniSystems Hellas, come to a free event, on Friday 21 April.
Categories: Java, Open Source

NetBeans IDE 8.2 Patch 1 Now Available

NetBeans Highlights - Sat, 03/25/2017 - 05:39
The NetBeans Team has released a patch for NetBeans IDE 8.2 with fixes that enhance stability and performance. As you can learn more about the fixes in the NetBeans IDE 8.2 Patching Info Wiki page, the update fixes 110 bugs mainly in CND area. To obtain the fixes, NetBeans IDE 8.2 must be installed and running. Once you see an update notification in status bar, click the notification to install the updates. You can also download the fixes through the NetBeans IDE Plugins Manager (Tools > Plugins menu item) or the About dialog (Help > About menu item).
Categories: Java, Open Source

The Rise of NetBeans - Why The Increasingly Popular IDE Has Streamlined Java Application Development

NetBeans Highlights - Sat, 03/25/2017 - 05:39
Originally a student project in 1996, NetBeans has since become one of the most popular IDEs among app developers. Right out of the box, it boasts a code generator, debugging tools, a GUI builder, and support for your choice of programming language (Java, JavaScript, PHP, C++, HTML, and others welcome!), allowing you to easily create desktop, web, mobile, or HTML5 applications. The extensible platform is free, open-source, and backed by a dedicated community that knows best-practice software development. With their adoption by the Apatche Foundation and goals to continue to evolve alongside JDK releases, NetBeans is sure to remain a valuable resource for the open-source community well into the foreseeable future.
Categories: Java, Open Source

NetBeans Community Approves NetBeans IDE 8.2 for Release

NetBeans Highlights - Sat, 03/25/2017 - 05:39
We are pleased to announce the results of the NetBeans IDE 8.2 Community Acceptance Survey that ended October 2nd: 89% of 64 respondents agree that NetBeans IDE 8.2 Release Candidate is stable enough to be shipped! A few respondents pointed out several serious issues. We evaluated them all not to overlook some important problem. We are very delighted that all Node.js users consider the support rock solid but also high satisfaction with newly introduced Docker support and SQL Profiling is very positive. Check it out yourselves! Overall, this is good news for the NetBeans IDE 8.2 from the community, and we thank all who provided this valuable feedback!
Categories: Java, Open Source

Build with NetBeans IDE, Deploy to Oracle Java Cloud Service

NetBeans Highlights - Sat, 03/25/2017 - 05:39
Save time and effort deploying applications. Learn to set up Oracle Java Cloud Service, then install and use the Oracle Cloud plugin in the NetBeans IDE.
Categories: Java, Open Source

Build a Rich Client Platform To-Do Application in NetBeans IDE

NetBeans Highlights - Sat, 03/25/2017 - 05:39
Practice using NetBeans IDE features that improve code quality and increase developer productivity.
Categories: Java, Open Source

Video: Installing and Using Java ME SDK 8.0 Plugins in NetBeans IDE

NetBeans Highlights - Sat, 03/25/2017 - 05:39
This screencast demonstrates installation and usage of Oracle Java ME SDK 8.0 Plugins in NetBeans IDE on the Windows operating system.
Categories: Java, Open Source

Dispatches from the latest Mercurial sprints

Google Open Source Blog - Fri, 03/24/2017 - 17:51
On March 10th-12th, the Mercurial project held one of its twice-a-year sprints in the Google Mountain View office. Mercurial is a distributed version control system, used by Google, W3C, OpenJDK and Mozilla among others. We had 40 developers in attendance, some from companies with large Mercurial deployments and some individual contributors who volunteer in their spare time.

One of the major themes we discussed was user-friendliness. Mercurial developers work hard to keep the command-line interface backwards compatible, but at the same time, we would like to make progress by smoothing out some rough edges. We discussed how we can provide a better user interface for users to opt-in to without breaking the backwards compatibility constraint. We also talked about how to make Mercurial’s Changeset Evolution feature easier to use.

We considered moving Mercurial past SHA1 for revision identification, to enhance security and integrity of Mercurial repositories in light of recent SHA1 exploits. A rough consensus on a plan started to emerge, and design docs should start to circulate in the next month or so.

We also talked about performance, such as new storage layers that would scale more effectively and work better with clones that only contain a partial repository history, a key requirement for Mercurial adoption in enterprise environments with large repositories, like Google.

If you are interested in finding out more about Mercurial (or perhaps you’d like to contribute!) you can find our mailing list information here.

By Martin von Zweigbergk and Augie Fackler, Software Engineers
Categories: Open Source

“Community Choice” Project of the Month Vote – May 2017

SourceForge.net: Front page news - Fri, 03/24/2017 - 05:17

The vote for May 2017 Community Choice SourceForge Project of the Month is now available, and will run until April 15, 2017 12:00 UTC.


Free Pascal Compiler

A 32/64/16-bit Pascal compiler for Win32/64/CE, Linux, Mac OS X/iOS, FreeBSD, OS/2, Game Boy Advance, Nintendo NDS and DOS; semantically compatible with Delphi, Borland Pascal and Mac Pascal (partially) with extra features, e.g. operator overloading.
[ Download Free Pascal Compiler ]


rEFInd

rEFInd is a fork of the rEFIt boot manager. Like rEFIt, rEFInd can auto-detect your installed EFI boot loaders and it presents a pretty GUI menu of boot options. rEFInd goes beyond rEFIt in that rEFInd better handles systems with many boot loaders, gives better control over the boot loader search process, and provides the ability for users to define their own boot loader entries.
[ Download rEFInd ]


Alt-F

Alt-F provides a free alternative firmware for the DLINK DNS-320/320L/321/323/325/327L. Alt-F has Samba and NFS; supports ext2/3/4, VFAT, NTFS and ISO9660 filesystems; RAID 0, 1, 5 (with external USB disk) and JBOD; supports 2/3/4TB disks; rsync, ftp, sftp, ftps, ssh, lpd, DNS and DHCP servers, DDNS, fan and leds control, clean power up and down… and more. Alt-F also has a set of comprehensive administering web pages, you don’t need to use the command line to configure it. Besides the built-in software, Alt-F also supports additional packages on disk, including ffp packages, that you can install, update and uninstall using the administering web pages Alt-F is still beta and is being developed and tested on a DNS-323-rev-A1/B1, a DNS325-rev-A1, a DNS-320L-rev-A1 and on a DNS-327L-rev-A1 hardware boards. Other models and boards are said to work. Support Forum: http://groups.google.com/group/alt-f Homepage: http://sites.google.com/site/altfirmware
[ Download Alt-F ]


Skim

Skim is a PDF reader and note-taker for OS X. It is designed to help you read and annotate scientific papers in PDF, but is also great for viewing any PDF file. Skim requires Mac OS X 10.6 or higher.
[ Download Skim ]


LXLE

Change is good but changing everything isn’t always great. Same is true for aging computers and their operating systems. Support is sometimes lost too quickly with a 6 month core release cycle. Graphics & Audio cards and chipsets get dropped along with other miscellaneous functions with programs or drivers that just go missing. We all like having updated software and we certainly don’t like down time or loss of features and capabilities. I believe most aging hardware just needs the right system on it, and lets face it, it helps keep a couple bucks in your pocket if you can squeeze a few more years out of your current system; without sacrificing performance, capability, usability and of course aesthetics. http://lxle.net/forums/
[ Download LXLE ]


digiCamControl

digiCamControl is a free and open source software. This allows you to save time by transferring images directly from your camera to your computer as you take each shot and controls camera shooting parameters.
[ Download digiCamControl ]


Linux Lite

By producing an easy to use Linux based Operating System, we hope that people will discover just how simple it can be to use Linux Lite. Linux Lite is free for everyone to use and share, and suitable for people who are new to Linux or for people who want a lightweight environment that is also fully functional. Linux Lite is based on the Ubuntu LTS series giving you 5 years of support per major release. The following software is included: LibreOffice Suite, VLC Media Player, Firefox Web Browser, Thunderbird Email, Gimp Image Editor, Lite Themes, Lite User Manager, Lite Software, Lite Tweaks, Lite Welcome, Lite Manual, Whiskermenu and more. Laptop/Ultrabook/Netbook users: If the screen locks during Live mode, type ‘linux’ into the user box and click on the Login button (no password required) https://www.linuxliteos.com/
[ Download Linux Lite ]


Free Manga Downloader

The Free Manga Downloader (FMD) is an open source application written in Object-Pascal for managing and downloading manga from various websites. This is a mirror of main repository on GitHub. For feedback/bug report visit https://github.com/riderkick/FMD
[ Download Free Manga Downloader ]


fre:ac – free audio converter

fre:ac is a free audio converter and CD ripper for various formats and encoders. It features MP3, MP4/M4A, WMA, Ogg Vorbis, FLAC, AAC, and Bonk format support, integrates freedb/CDDB, CDText and ID3v2 tagging and is available in several languages.
[ Download fre:ac – free audio converter ]

Categories: Open Source

Board Election Results 2017

Eclipse News - Fri, 03/24/2017 - 01:00
The Eclipse Foundation announces the 2017 Board Member Election Results.
Categories: Open Source

Eclipse Newsletter - Internet of all the Things

Eclipse News - Thu, 03/23/2017 - 14:30
The articles feature Eclipse IoT projects including, Eclipse Hono, Eclipse ioFog, Eclipse Kapua, and Eclipse Vorto.
Categories: Open Source

An Upgrade to SyntaxNet, New Models and a Parsing Competition

Google Open Source Blog - Wed, 03/22/2017 - 16:43
At Google, we continuously improve the language understanding capabilities used in applications ranging from generation of email responses to translation. Last summer, we open-sourced SyntaxNet, a neural-network framework for analyzing and understanding the grammatical structure of sentences. Included in our release was Parsey McParseface, a state-of-the-art model that we had trained for analyzing English, followed quickly by a collection of pre-trained models for 40 additional languages, which we dubbed Parsey's Cousins. While we were excited to share our research and to provide these resources to the broader community, building machine learning systems that work well for languages other than English remains an ongoing challenge. We are excited to announce a few new research resources, available now, that address this problem.

SyntaxNet Upgrade
We are releasing a major upgrade to SyntaxNet. This upgrade incorporates nearly a year’s worth of our research on multilingual language understanding, and is available to anyone interested in building systems for processing and understanding text. At the core of the upgrade is a new technology that enables learning of richly layered representations of input sentences. More specifically, the upgrade extends TensorFlow to allow joint modeling of multiple levels of linguistic structure, and to allow neural-network architectures to be created dynamically during processing of a sentence or document.

Our upgrade makes it, for example, easy to build character-based models that learn to compose individual characters into words (e.g. ‘c-a-t’ spells ‘cat’). By doing so, the models can learn that words can be related to each other because they share common parts (e.g. ‘cats’ is the plural of ‘cat’ and shares the same stem; ‘wildcat’ is a type of ‘cat’). Parsey and Parsey’s Cousins, on the other hand, operated over sequences of words. As a result, they were forced to memorize words seen during training and relied mostly on the context to determine the grammatical function of previously unseen words.

As an example, consider the following (meaningless but grammatically correct) sentence:
This sentence was originally coined by Andrew Ingraham who explained: “You do not know what this means; nor do I. But if we assume that it is English, we know that the doshes are distimmed by the gostak. We know too that one distimmer of doshes is a gostak." Systematic patterns in morphology and syntax allow us to guess the grammatical function of words even when they are completely novel: we understand that ‘doshes’ is the plural of the noun ‘dosh’ (similar to the ‘cats’ example above) or that ‘distim’ is the third person singular of the verb distim. Based on this analysis we can then derive the overall structure of this sentence even though we have never seen the words before.

ParseySaurus
To showcase the new capabilities provided by our upgrade to SyntaxNet, we are releasing a set of new pretrained models called ParseySaurus. These models use the character-based input representation mentioned above and are thus much better at predicting the meaning of new words based both on their spelling and how they are used in context. The ParseySaurus models are far more accurate than Parsey’s Cousins (reducing errors by as much as 25%), particularly for morphologically-rich languages like Russian, or agglutinative languages like Turkish and Hungarian. In those languages there can be dozens of forms for each word and many of these forms might never be observed during training - even in a very large corpus.

Consider the following fictitious Russian sentence, where again the stems are meaningless, but the suffixes define an unambiguous interpretation of the sentence structure:
Even though our Russian ParseySaurus model has never seen these words, it can correctly analyze the sentence by inspecting the character sequences which constitute each word. In doing so, the system can determine many properties of the words (notice how many more morphological features there are here than in the English example). To see the sentence as ParseySaurus does, here is a visualization of how the model analyzes this sentence:
Each square represents one node in the neural network graph, and lines show the connections between them. The left-side “tail” of the graph shows the model consuming the input as one long string of characters. These are intermittently passed to the right side, where the rich web of connections shows the model composing words into phrases and producing a syntactic parse. Check out the full-size rendering here.

A Competition
You might be wondering whether character-based modeling are all we need or whether there are other techniques that might be important. SyntaxNet has lots more to offer, like beam search and different training objectives, but there are of course also many other possibilities. To find out what works well in practice we are helping co-organize, together with Charles University and other colleagues, a multilingual parsing competition at this year’s Conference on Computational Natural Language Learning (CoNLL) with the goal of building syntactic parsing systems that work well in real-world settings and for 45 different languages.

The competition is made possible by the Universal Dependencies (UD) initiative, whose goal is to develop cross-linguistically consistent treebanks. Because machine learned models can only be as good as the data that they have access to, we have been contributing data to UD since 2013. For the competition, we partnered with UD and DFKI to build a new multilingual evaluation set consisting of 1000 sentences that have been translated into 20+ different languages and annotated by linguists with parse trees. This evaluation set is the first of its kind (in the past, each language had its own independent evaluation set) and will enable more consistent cross-lingual comparisons. Because the sentences have the same meaning and have been annotated according to the same guidelines, we will be able to get closer to answering the question of which languages might be harder to parse.

We hope that the upgraded SyntaxNet framework and our the pre-trained ParseySaurus models will inspire researchers to participate in the competition. We have additionally created a tutorial showing how to load a Docker image and train models on the Google Cloud Platform, to facilitate participation by smaller teams with limited resources. So, if you have an idea for making your own models with the SyntaxNet framework, sign up to compete! We believe that the configurations that we are releasing are a good place to start, but we look forward to seeing how participants will be able to extend and improve these models or perhaps create better ones!

Thanks to everyone involved who made this competition happen, including our collaborators at UD-Pipe, who provide another baseline implementation to make it easy to enter the competition. Happy parsing from the main developers, Chris Alberti, Daniel Andor, Ivan Bogatyy, Mark Omernick, Zora Tung and Ji Ma!

By David Weiss and Slav Petrov, Research Scientists
Categories: Open Source

Top 4 Media Players of the Week

SourceForge.net: Front page news - Wed, 03/22/2017 - 13:01

This is the first of a brand new blog series which will feature the top-performing projects on SourceForge under specific categories. This week, we feature the top 4 media players of the week available on SourceForge.

Media players come in many different forms and with different capabilities. Often one or more is required in almost every PC. Whether for entertainment or education, movies or music-making, a good media player is a useful tool for users of all levels.

Here are the top 5 media players available here at SourceForge, based on weekly downloads:


SMPlayer

SMPlayer is a highly-rated free media player for Windows and Linux with built-in codecs for playing YouTube videos. It boasts several features including a number of filters, thumbnail generator, video equalizer, skins and more. One of its most interesting features is its ability to remember the settings of all the files you play.

SMPlayer is a graphical user interface (GUI) for the award-winning MPlayer, which is capable of playing almost all known video and audio formats. It’s been named a Project of the Week a number of times and continues to be one of the best-performing media players on SourceForge.

[ Download SMPlayer ]


MediaPortal

MediaPortal turns your PC into a very advanced MediaCenter/ HTPC by allowing you to watch TV, videos, DVDs and more from your PC. It lets you schedule and record live TV, watch and store your videos, and listen to music, the radio, or to live streams. It also has among its features a skin system, weather forecast, picture viewer and more.

MediaPortal has been named a Project of the Week in previous weeks and has also been awarded “Staff Pick” Project of the Month in July 2016.

[ Download MediaPortal ]


TuxGuitar

TuxGuitar is a multitrack guitar tablature editor and player written in Java-SWT. Easy-to-use and feature-filled, it has become a favorite of expert and novice musicians alike. It can open GuitarPro, PowerTab and TablEdit files. It also has several useful features such as a multitrack display, score viewer, note duration management, various effects and more.

TuxGuitar has joined our Projects of the Week lists several times before and has received plenty of praise from users.

[ Download TuxGuitar ]


SoX- Sound eXchange

SoX- Sound eXchange is labelled as “the Swiss Army Knife of sound processing utilities,” and rightfully so. SoX can convert audio files into other popular audio file types and can also apply sound effects and filters during the conversion. And of course, it can also play and record audio files.

SoX is cross-platform and has all the features necessary to make editing sound recordings an absolute breeze.

[ Download SoX ]

See and know more of the many other Media Players available on SourceForge here.

Categories: Open Source