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Open Source

Progress Update on IP @ Eclipse

Eclipse News - 2 hours 22 min ago
We are rolling out the new Eclipse Contributor Agreement (ECA).
Categories: Open Source

From Summer of Code to Game of Thrones on the back of a JavaScript Dragon (Part 3)

Google Open Source Blog - Fri, 08/26/2016 - 18:45
This guest post is a part of a short series about Tatyana Goldberg, Guy Yachdav and Christian Dallago and the journey that was inspired by their participation as Google Summer of Code mentors for the BioJS project. Check out the first and second posts in the series.

This blog post marks the end of our short series following our adventures in open source. As you may recall, it all started thanks to Google Summer of Code (GSoC) which brought our team together. The GSoC collaboration spurred us to start a class Technical University of Munich (TUM) that eventually took on the Game of Thrones data science project and became an international sensation.

The success of our Game of Thrones project opened a lot of doors which is what we discuss in this post. First, we were invited to participate in the Morpheus Cup which is a prestigious university olympiad that brings together students from all over Europe to compete in digital challenges.

Our team rocked the competition winning two challenges and making it to the finalist stage in the third challenge. We were honored to represent our university and grateful for Google’s sponsorship of our team.
WhatsApp-Image-20160510 (1).jpegThe students and mentors of the Game of Thrones project at the Morpheus Cup challenge in May 2016. From left to right: Georgi Anastasov, Emiliyana Kalinova, Maximilian Bandle (all students), Guy Yachdav (mentor), Christian Dallago (mentor), Tobias Piffrader, Theodor Chesleran (both students) and Tatyana Goldberg (mentor).Another opportunity that followed was an invitation to speak at a TEDx event at TUM on July 28th, 2016. In the event, titled “The Common Extraordinary,” Guy presented our work with data mining as bioinformaticians, sharing how we’ve made the field of data science accessible to our students and how we helped popularize it through the Game of Thrones project.
More speaking engagements are already scheduled: at meetups, coffee talks and conferences where we plan to keep evangelizing data mining and tell the story of our open source adventure.
What’s next? We’re excited to continue as mentors and org admins in GSoC and to carry on teaching data science and JavaScript at the university. A recent trade media report pointed out that the “out-of-the-box” thinking demonstrated in our course may revolutionize entire industries. In fact, we are currently signing up industry collaborators to work together on data mining projects.
It’s also extremely rewarding to see how our project resonated with so many people with diverse backgrounds and interests. Friends, family members, colleagues and even strangers ask us whether we can help them use data mining to answer questions on subjects ranging from politics, science, sports and even their personal lives.
Just the other day we were approached with the idea of developing an app that would take in a set of personality traits, process them along with social network data and help in suggesting life decisions: Should I date that person? Should I really take this job? Is Baltimore the city for me?
In the near future we dream of starting our own consultancy, as we already have requests from companies that want our help with upcoming data science projects. It seems our team has found its entrepreneurial bent!
We hope enjoyed this trilogy of blog posts, that our story has inspired you and that you too will continue to adventure in open source and collaborative development. If you’re not involved with Google Summer of Code, consider joining. It’s a great way to build up your project and share it with the world. More importantly, it lets you work with amazing people with whom, as we learned, it is possible to reach the sky.
By Tatyana Goldberg, Christian Dallago, and Guy Yachdav, BioJS
Categories: Open Source

genModelAddon

Date Created: Fri, 2016-08-26 08:50Date Updated: Fri, 2016-08-26 09:29Submitted by: Olivier Prouvost

This project will help you to separate properly the EMF generated code and your developed code.

When you generate the EMF code, you probably override it with the @generated annotation. This is correct but generated and developed code are mixed. It is better to separate both.

This projet will generate the appropriate structure and will manage the appropriate factory_override extension to make it transparent to the developper.

Categories: Open Source

“Community Choice” Project of the Month Vote – October 2016

SourceForge.net: Front page news - Fri, 08/26/2016 - 05:04

The vote for October 2016 Community Choice SourceForge Project of the Month is now available, and will run until September 15, 2016 12:00 UTC.


Battle for Wesnoth Android Port

[ Download Battle for Wesnoth Android Port ]


Simplicity Linux

Simplicity Linux uses Puppy Linux and derivatives as a base, uses the XFCE window manager, and comes in 3 editions: Netbook, Desktop and Media. Netbook features cloud based software, Desktop features locally based software and Media edition is designed to allow people who want a lounge PC to access their media with ease.
[ Download Simplicity Linux ]


Miranda IM

Miranda IM is an open source, multi-protocol instant messaging client designed to be very light on system resources, extremely fast and customizable. A powerful plugin-based architecture make Miranda IM one of the most flexible clients on the planet.
[ Download Miranda IM ]


Tcl

Tool Command Language (Tcl) is an interpreted language and very portable interpreter for that language. Tcl is embeddable and extensible, and has been widely used since its creation in 1988 by John Ousterhout. Bug reports to http://core.tcl.tk/tcl/ Follow code development at http://core.tcl.tk/tcl/
[ Download Tcl ]


Hugin

With Hugin you can assemble a mosaic of photographs into a complete immersive panorama, stitch any series of overlapping pictures and much more.
[ Download Hugin ]


GO Contact Sync Mod

+++ NEWS +++ The newest versions of Google APIs client Library for .NET dropped support for .NET 4.0. Minimum requirement for GO Contact Sync Mod (starting with v3.10.0) is .NET 4.5 which is not working on Windows XP. —————————————————– GO Contact Sync Mod synchronizes your Microsoft Outlook contacts with your Google Mail address book, including pictures, categories and notes. Since version 3.7.0 it also syncs your Outlook Calendar Appointments on demand to Google Calendar. This Mod fork adds many enhancements and bug fixes to the obviously dead project ‘Go Contact Sync’. Please find some guidelines how to sync your mobile phone contacts with Google Contacts here: http://www.google.com/mobile/sync
[ Download GO Contact Sync Mod ]


Universal Media Server

Universal Media Server is a DLNA-compliant UPnP Media Server Universal Media Server supports all major operating systems, with versions for Windows, Linux and Mac OS X. The program streams or transcodes many different media formats with little or no configuration. UMS is powered by MEncoder, FFmpeg, tsMuxeR, AviSynth, MediaInfo and more, which combine to offer support for a wide range of media formats Check out the list of media renderers here: http://www.universalmediaserver.com/about/
[ Download Universal Media Server ]


BluestarLinux

Bluestar Linux is an Arch Linux-based distribution, built with an understanding that people want and need a solid Operating System that provides a breadth of functionality and ease of use without sacrificing aesthetics. Bluestar is offered in three edtions – desktop, deskpro and developer – each tailored to address the needs of a variety of Linux users. Bluestar can be installed permanently as a robust and fully configurable operating system on a laptop or desktop system, or it can be run effectively as a live installer and supports the addition of persistent storage for those who choose not to perform a permanent installation. A Bluestar Linux software repository is also maintained in order to provide additional tools and applications when needed or requested. Bluestar provides the following features: Up-to-date Kernel Wide Variety of Applications – Always Current Versions Full Development / Desktop / Multimedia Environment
[ Download BluestarLinux ]


Nagios Core

Nagios network monitoring software is a powerful, enterprise-class host, server, application, and network monitoring tools. Designed to be fast, flexible, and rock-solid stable. Nagios runs on *NIX hosts and can monitor Windows, Linux/Unix/BSD, Netware, and network devices.
[ Download Nagios Core ]

Categories: Open Source

Eclipse IoT Day @ ThingMonk | Register Now

Eclipse News - Tue, 08/23/2016 - 17:36
Register for the Eclipse IoT Day @ ThingMonk taking place in London on Sept. 12!
Categories: Open Source

Angular2 Eclipse

Date Created: Mon, 2016-08-22 21:21Date Updated: Tue, 2016-08-23 09:15Submitted by: Angelo ZERR

Angular2 Eclipse is a set of plugins which provide support for Angular2:

Categories: Open Source

TypeScript IDE

Date Created: Mon, 2016-08-22 21:03Date Updated: Tue, 2016-08-23 09:15Submitted by: Angelo ZERR

TypeScript IDE provides 2 main features:

  • a TypeScript Editor which provides TypeScript completion, validation hover, etc for TypeScript files (*.ts), JSX files (*.jsx/*.tsx) and even simple JavaScript file since TypeScript 1.8 supports it (Salsa).
  • a TypeScript Compiler to compile on save, or build on save TypeScript *.ts/*.tsx files to emited *.js/*.js.map files
Categories: Open Source

Stories from Google Code-in: OpenMRS and SCoRe

Google Open Source Blog - Mon, 08/22/2016 - 18:00
Google Code-in is our annual contest that gives students age 13 to 17 experience in computer science through contributions to open source projects. This blog post is the third installment in our series reflecting on the experiences of Google Code-in 2015 grand prize winners. Be sure to check out the first and second posts in the series, too.

In this post we look at the stories of three more Google Code-in (GCI) grand prize winners. Our grand prize winners come from a pool of 980 students from 65 countries who, all told, completed 4,776 tasks for 14 open source projects.

We were lucky enough to host many of these extraordinary young coders at Google HQ for a few days this summer. Over that time, we learned more about where they came from, what they gained by participating in GCI and what they plan to do as new members of the open source community.

Google Code-in 2015 Grand Prize Winners explore the SF Bay Area in this immersive Google Street View display with fellow open source program managers Stephanie Taylor and Cat Allman who run GCI.Our first story today is that of Břetislav Hájek from the Czech Republic, who chose to work with the OpenMRS project because he sees their work as important. OpenMRS is an open source medical record system that improves healthcare delivery in resource-constrained regions.

Břetislav got into computer science through web development, so he started by working on tasks related to HTML and CSS. This gave him confidence to take on more challenging tasks. His favorite task was creating a web application for searching through patients. While he didn’t find it hard, he learned a lot and was proud to have made something useful. Reflecting on Google Code-in, Břetislav said: “That's the thing I like about GCI. I always treat tasks as opportunities to learn something new. And the learning is more entertaining since I work on real problems.”

IRC communication proved to be an important part of Břetislav’s success. Other students were there and tried to help each other out as best they could, and there were always mentors available to help guide them. He enjoyed the friendly environment. The community motivated him to work harder and try new things. In the end, Břetislav was glad to have participated and is motivated to continue his work.

Next we have Vicente Bermudez from Uruguay who discovered Google Code-in through a story in the local news celebrating a Uruguayan grand prize winner from a previous year. Like Břetislav, Vicente chose to work on the OpenMRS project because the cause spoke to him.

He got into programming through his love of video games and his desire to create his own. He hadn’t heard about programming before but initial research piqued his interest. Following his curiosity, he learned Java and expanded his knowledge from there. Conveniently, much of OpenMRS is built with Java!

The task-based structure worked well for Vicente. He was unsure of some tasks, recognizing that he didn’t know much about what they required. For instance, he hesitated to take on one that involved creating a Windows Phone app because he had never created a mobile app. But he persisted and, five days later, he had completed it and learned a lot about mobile development.

It surprised Vicente how much he learned in such a short time span. He had this to say: “During the contest I gained knowledge in a variety of fields such as programming, testing, video editing, and graphic design. The mentors encouraged us to think about quality instead of quantity, and I learned a lot from that.”

Vicente loved his Google Code-in experience and plans to continue contributing to open source projects, especially OpenMRS.

The last student story we’ll share today is that of Anesu Mafuvadze, a student from the US who worked with the Sustainable Computing Research Group (SCoRe). His introduction to computer science came through robotics in one of his high school classes which used a language similar to C++.

Anesu was thrilled by the experience of bringing the robots to life with code. He described his introduction this way: “The more I programmed the more captivated I became; I loved how easily I could convert my wildest ideas into fully functioning programs; I loved the thrill of working in an environment that demands minute precision; above all, I loved creating programs that other people found useful.”

Online documentation and YouTube tutorials fueled Anesu’s education for several years as he picked up multiple languages and began participating in programming contests. But he knew something was missing, Anesu lacked real world coding experience and had never collaborated with others. As such, he didn’t pay much attention to the readability of his code, wasn’t aware of version control, didn’t write extensive tests and had never built something for the common good.

Enter Google Code-in. Working with mentors helped Anesu deliver quality and building open source software required him to learn collaboration tools and value readability. The contest also gave him an opportunity to build on skills that he hadn’t developed, such as web development. Anesu says the experience made him a better programmer and that the introduction to open source has motivated him to use his skills on projects that benefit society.

Thank you to Břetislav, Vicente and Anesu for their hard work contributing to open source projects and for sharing their stories with us. We have one more blog post coming with more student stories so stay tuned!

By Josh Simmons, Open Source Programs Office
Categories: Open Source

Cohorte Studio

Date Created: Mon, 2016-08-22 04:14Date Updated: Fri, 2016-08-26 10:01Submitted by: Ahmad SHAHWAN

This is a Cohorte Developers Toolkit for Eclipse. It allows developers to easily develop and maintain Cohorte projects.

Categories: Open Source

Projects of the Week, August 22, 2016

SourceForge.net: Front page news - Mon, 08/22/2016 - 05:05

Here are the featured projects for the week, which appear on the front page of SourceForge.net:

OpenMandriva Lx

OpenMandriva Lx is an exciting free Desktop Operating System that aims to cater to and interest first time and advanced users alike. It has the breadth and depth of an advanced system but is designed to be simple and straightforward in use. OpenMandriva Lx comes from a 100% community-driven association that believes in the values of free software & collaboration and whose founding values are development, equality, co-operation, openness, freedom, group achievement, independence, and solidarity. Our sources can be found here: https://github.com/OpenMandrivaAssociation Our spohisticated build system can be found here: http://abf.openmandriva.org/ Talk to us: * IRC – #openmandriva-cooker on freenode.net * Forums – https://forums.openmandriva.org * Mailing list – https://wiki.openmandriva.org/en/Mailinglist Report a bug or new feature: * Bugzilla – https://issues.openmandriva.org
[ Download OpenMandriva Lx ]


Maui Linux

Maui is a full desktop Linux distribution, that ships with the Plasma Shell workspace and many Open Source applications.
[ Download Maui Linux ]


Cyberfox

Cyberfox is a Mozilla-based Internet browser designed to take advantage of 64-bit architecture but a 32-bit version is also available. The application provides a higher memory performance when navigating your favorite pages. Compatible Windows Operating Systems: Windows 7/7 SP1 OS x86|x64 Windows 8/8.x OS x86|x64 Windows 10 OS x86|x64 (Windows XP Unsupported, Windows Vista Unsupported) Dedicated support forums. https://8pecxstudios.com/Forums/index.php Dedicated Contact Forms. https://cyberfox.8pecxstudios.com/contact-us Profile Buddy: Transfer your profile from any Mozilla base browser. https://8pecxstudios.com/Forums/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=350 Tell us what you think and write a review.
[ Download Cyberfox ]


picoreplayer

piCorePlayer is an embedded Squeezebox player build on piCore, the Raspberry Pi port of Tiny Core Linux with Squeezelite for your Raspberry Pi board.
[ Download picoreplayer ]


LDAP Admin

Windows LDAP editor, includes support for POSIX groups and accounts, SAMBA accounts, some Postfix objects and more
[ Download LDAP Admin ]


salix

Salix is a linux distribution based on Slackware that is simple and easy to use. Salix aims to be completely backwards compatible with Slackware, so Slackware users can benefit from Salix repositories.
[ Download salix ]


Arch Bang

ArchBang is a simple GNU/Linux distribution which provides you with a lightweight Arch Linux system combined with the OpenBox window manager. Suitable for both desktop and portable systems – It is fast, stable, and always up to date. Summer 2016 we have gone systemd free, we now ship with OpenRC init system.
[ Download Arch Bang ]


x64dbg

An open-source x64/x32 debugger for windows. If you don’t trust SourceForge, you can always get the latest snapshot here: http://releases.x64dbg.com You need the Microsoft Visual C++ Runtimes to run x64dbg: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=40784
[ Download x64dbg ]


Sky Chart / Cartes du Ciel

SkyChart is a software to draw chart of the night sky for the amateur astronomer from a bunch of stars and nebulae catalogs. See main web page for full download. This software is part of a full suite for astronomical observation: https://sourceforge.net/projects/ccdciel/ https://sourceforge.net/projects/indistarter/ https://sourceforge.net/projects/eqmodgui/ Requirement: https://sourceforge.net/projects/libpasastro/ See also: https://sourceforge.net/projects/indi/
[ Download Sky Chart / Cartes du Ciel ]

Categories: Open Source

Find/replace with regular expressions and match evaluators

Date Created: Sun, 2016-08-21 16:24Date Updated: Tue, 2016-08-23 09:12Submitted by: fingerl

This is an eclipse plugin, that extends the functionality of the find/replace dialog in eclipse.
If this plugin is installed, you can open a find/replace dialog if you press the key combination Ctrl + F5 (or Cmd + F5 on mac computers) while a text editor is active. Then you can search for a regular expression in the text editor and write a function in Java that takes a MatchResult object as a parameter and returns a String. This function is used by the plugin to replace matches.

The plugin can be installed via the update site https://github.com/florianingerl/com.florian.regexfindandreplace/raw/mas....

Categories: Open Source

MechatronicUML

Date Created: Sun, 2016-08-21 04:48Date Updated: Tue, 2016-08-23 09:11Submitted by: Uwe Pohlmann

Innovative features of cooperating, intelligent cyber-physical systems are realized by complex software . Examples of such systems are connected cars, distributed production systems, and applications within smart homes.
A systematic and consistent design methodology and tool support for efficient software development are needed to realize high quality software and to avoid critical errors early. The Heinz Nixdorf Institute developed and evaluated in practice the methodology MechatronicUML in cooperation with Fraunhofer IEM and companies from industry. MechatronicUML provides an integrated Tool Suite for software design, platform design, allocation engineering, and C-code generation. Static testing , model checking, and model-in-the loop simulations ensure functional correctness of safety-properties during the development.

Categories: Open Source

My Five Favorite NetBeans Features

NetBeans Highlights - Sat, 08/20/2016 - 06:28
Continuing a series of articles focusing on NetBeans users and their five favorite NetBeans IDE features, here’s the next part, by Damir Demirović.
Categories: Java, Open Source

Code Sharing for NetBeans Developers

NetBeans Highlights - Sat, 08/20/2016 - 06:28
Through the years, a recurring request by developers everywhere—not least among NetBeans users—is a facility for collaborative development.
Categories: Java, Open Source

Announcing: Oracle JavaScript Extension Toolkit MOOC!

NetBeans Highlights - Sat, 08/20/2016 - 06:28
From August 22nd, the Oracle JET and NetBeans team are hosting a Massive Open Online course for three weeks.
Categories: Java, Open Source

Help Us Stabilize NetBeans IDE 8.2 - Join NetCAT 8.2!

NetBeans Highlights - Sat, 08/20/2016 - 06:28
Do you enjoy playing with software and hunting for bugs? If you are a passionate NetBeans IDE user and you have a few hours per week from July 2016 through mid September 2016, you can join other community volunteers in the NetCAT 8.2 program. Get your NetBeans bug(s) fixed and make friends along the way. Thanks! The NetBeans team
Categories: Java, Open Source

NetBeans Community Approves NetBeans IDE 8.1 for Release

NetBeans Highlights - Sat, 08/20/2016 - 06:28
We are pleased to announce the results of the NetBeans IDE 8.1 Community Acceptance Survey that ended November 2nd: 85% of 89 respondents agree that NetBeans IDE 8.1 Release Candidate is stable enough to be shipped! A few respondents pointed out several serious issues. We evaluated them all not to overlook some important problem. We have noticed that majority of web programmers appreciate improved generic support for JavaScript development like enhanced Node.js support, debugging, inspection and especially testing and packaging so our investment into this area paid off. Another success worth mentioning is big (98%) satisfaction with redesigned Java Profiler. Check it out yourselves! Overall, this is a good news for the NetBeans IDE 8.1 from the community, and we thank all who provided this valuable feedback!
Categories: Java, Open Source

Build with NetBeans IDE, Deploy to Oracle Java Cloud Service

NetBeans Highlights - Sat, 08/20/2016 - 06:28
Save time and effort deploying applications. Learn to set up Oracle Java Cloud Service, then install and use the Oracle Cloud plugin in the NetBeans IDE.
Categories: Java, Open Source

Build a Rich Client Platform To-Do Application in NetBeans IDE

NetBeans Highlights - Sat, 08/20/2016 - 06:28
Practice using NetBeans IDE features that improve code quality and increase developer productivity.
Categories: Java, Open Source

Video: Installing and Using Java ME SDK 8.0 Plugins in NetBeans IDE

NetBeans Highlights - Sat, 08/20/2016 - 06:28
This screencast demonstrates installation and usage of Oracle Java ME SDK 8.0 Plugins in NetBeans IDE on the Windows operating system.
Categories: Java, Open Source