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Open Source

Project of the Week, June 29, 2015

SourceForge.net: Front page news - Mon, 06/29/2015 - 06:08

Here are the featured projects for the week, which appear on the front page of SourceForge.net:


TeXstudio – A LaTeX Editor

TeXstudio is a fully featured LaTeX editor. Our goal is to make writing LaTeX documents as easy and comfortable as possible. Some of the outstanding features of TeXstudio are an integrated PDF viewer with (almost) word-level synchronization, live inline preview, advanced syntax-highlighting, live reference check, citations, latex commands, spelling, and grammar.
[ Download TeXstudio – A LaTeX Editor ]


Octave-Forge

Octave-Forge is a central location for the collaborative development of packages for GNU Octave. The Octave-Forge packages expand Octave’s core functionality by providing field specific features via Octave’s package system. For example, image and signal processing, fuzzy logic, instrument control, and statistics packages are examples of individual Octave-Forge packages.
[ Download Octave-Forge ]


gnuplot development

A famous scientific plotting package, features include 2D and 3D plotting, a huge number of output formats, interactive input or script-driven options, and a large set of scripted examples.
[ Download gnuplot development ]


NAS4Free

NAS4Free is an embedded Open Source Storage distribution and supports
sharing across Windows, Apple, and UNIX-like systems. NAS4Free can be installed on Compact Flash/USB/SSD media, hard disk or booted of from a Live CD with a USB stick.
[ Download NAS4Free ]


ConEmu – Windows console with tabs

ConEmu-Maximus5 is a Windows console window enhancement (local terminal emulator), which presents multiple consoles and simple GUI applications as one customizable tabbed GUI window with various features. Initially, the program was created as a companion to Far Manager, my favorite shell replacement. Today, ConEmu can be used with any other console application or simple GUI tools, like PuTTY. ConEmu is an active project, open to suggestions.
[ Download ConEmu – Windows console with tabs ]


Robolinux

Robolinux is pleased to announce V7.9.2 LTS (Until 2018) X12+ Privacy & Security, with many enhancements, plus maintenance & upstream security updates, the newest VirtualBox, Firefox & Thunderbird versions, and three new apps. RoboLinux is a Linux desktop solution for a home office, SOHO, and enterprise users looking for a well-protected migration path away from other operating systems.
[ Download Robolinux ]


K-Meleon

K-Meleon is a fast and customizable web browser that can be used instead of Internet Explorer on Windows. Powered by the same Gecko engine as the Firefox and Mozilla browsers, K-Meleon provides users with a secure browsing experience.
[ Download K-Meleon ]


ScummVM

ScummVM is a cross-platform interpreter for many point-and-click adventure games. This includes LucasArts SCUMM games (such as Monkey Island 1-3, Day of the Tentacle, Sam & Max, …), many of Sierra’s AGI and SCI games (such as King’s Quest 1-6, Space Quest 1-5, …), Discworld 1 and 2, Simon the Sorcerer 1 and 2, Beneath A Steel Sky, Lure of the Temptress, Broken Sword 1 and 2, Flight of the Amazon Queen, Gobliiins 1-3, The Legend of Kyrandia 1-3, many of Humongous Entertainment’s children’s SCUMM games (including Freddi Fish and Putt Putt games) and many more.
[ Download ScummVM ]


KXStudio

KXStudio is a collection of tools and tweaks, targeted at audio and video production.
[ Download KXStudio ]

Categories: Open Source

Google Summer of Code 2015 midterms are here!

Google Open Source Blog - Fri, 06/26/2015 - 17:00
GoogleSummer_2015logo_horizontal.jpg
Today marks the halfway point of Google Summer of Code 2015. Both students and mentors will be submitting their midterm evaluations of one another through Friday, July 3 as indicated in our timeline. If you would like to read more about these midterm evaluations, please check out the "How Do Evaluations Work?" link on our FAQ.
The next milestone for the program will be the “pencils down” date of August 17, after which students can take a week to scrub their code, write tests, improve calculations and generally polish their work before the firm end of coding on August 21.
There has been fantastic progress made so far, and we encourage all the students, mentors, and org admins to keep up the great work!

by Carol Smith, Open Source Team
Categories: Open Source

Eclipse Newsletter - Landed on Mars

Eclipse News - Fri, 06/26/2015 - 16:00
Read up on new and exciting things for the Mars release, the Oomph Insaller, Docker tooling, and Java 9 support.
Categories: Open Source

Zoho CRM JDBC Driver

Date Created: June 25, 2015 - 12:01Date Updated: June 26, 2015 - 09:34Submitted by: CData Software

The Zoho CRM JDBC Driver is a powerful tool that allows you to easily connect-to live Zoho CRM data through any JDBC capable application or tool! With the Driver users can access Zoho CRM the same way that they would connect to any other JDBC data source. The Drivers are completely self-contained; no additional software installation is required.

Enterprise-class JDBC Connectivity

The Zoho CRM JDBC Driver offers the most natural way to access Zoho CRM data from any Java/J2EE application. Simply use the Zoho CRM Driver to connect and access data just as you would access any traditional database. The drivers is completely self-contained - no additional software installation is required!


*/ Connect To Zoho CRM From BI, ETL, & Reporting Tools

JDBC is the most widely supported interface for connecting Java-based applications with data. All kinds of BI, Reporting, ETL, Database, and Analytics tools offer the ability to read and write data via JDBC connectivity.


*/
  • Aqua Data Studio
  • Cisco Information Server
  • CloverETL
  • ColdFusion
  • Crystal Reports
  • DBeaver
  • DbVisualizer
  • IBM WebSphere
  • Informatica
  • IntelliJ
  • JBoss
  • Jetty
  • KNIME
  • NetBeans IDE
  • Oracle WebLogic
  • Oracle WareHouse Builder
  • RazorSQL
  • ... and many more!

The Zoho CRM Driver wraps the complexity of accessing Zoho CRM services in an easy-to-integrate, pure Java JDBC Driver. Applications then access Zoho CRM through the Zoho CRM Driver with simple Transact-SQL.

The CData JDBC Driver for Zoho CRM hides the complexity of accessing data and provides additional powerful security features, smart caching, batching, socket management, and more.

 

Eclipse Integration - Data Explorer

This JDBC Driver can be used to access and explore data directly from the Data Source Explorers included in popular java IDEs.


It's easy! Developers can connect the Data Source Explorer to the JDBC Driver, just like connecting to any standard database.

  1. Add a new Data Connection from the server explorer and select the Data Source
  2. Configure the basic connection properties to access your account data.


Explore real-time data! This JDBC Driver makes it easy to access live data directly from any modern Java IDE.

  1. After configuring the connection, explore the tables, views, and stored procedures provided by the JDBC Driver.
  2. These constructs return live UK data that developers can work with directly from within the IDE.


Categories: Open Source

Exchange JDBC Driver

Date Created: June 25, 2015 - 11:50Date Updated: June 26, 2015 - 09:34Submitted by: CData Software

The Exchange JDBC Driver is a powerful tool that allows you to easily connect-to live Microsoft Exchange data through any JDBC capable application or tool! With the Driver users can access Microsoft Exchange the same way that they would connect to any other JDBC data source. The Drivers are completely self-contained; no additional software installation is required.

Enterprise-class JDBC Connectivity

The Exchange JDBC Driver offers the most natural way to access Microsoft Exchange data from any Java/J2EE application. Simply use the Exchange Driver to connect and access data just as you would access any traditional database. The drivers is completely self-contained - no additional software installation is required!


*/ Connect To Microsoft Exchange From BI, ETL, & Reporting Tools

JDBC is the most widely supported interface for connecting Java-based applications with data. All kinds of BI, Reporting, ETL, Database, and Analytics tools offer the ability to read and write data via JDBC connectivity.


*/
  • Aqua Data Studio
  • Cisco Information Server
  • CloverETL
  • ColdFusion
  • Crystal Reports
  • DBeaver
  • DbVisualizer
  • IBM WebSphere
  • Informatica
  • IntelliJ
  • JBoss
  • Jetty
  • KNIME
  • NetBeans IDE
  • Oracle WebLogic
  • Oracle WareHouse Builder
  • RazorSQL
  • ... and many more!

The Exchange Driver wraps the complexity of accessing Microsoft Exchange services in an easy-to-integrate, pure Java JDBC Driver. Applications then access Microsoft Exchange through the Exchange Driver with simple Transact-SQL.

The CData JDBC Driver for Exchange hides the complexity of accessing data and provides additional powerful security features, smart caching, batching, socket management, and more.

 

Eclipse Integration - Data Explorer

This JDBC Driver can be used to access and explore data directly from the Data Source Explorers included in popular java IDEs.


It's easy! Developers can connect the Data Source Explorer to the JDBC Driver, just like connecting to any standard database.

  1. Add a new Data Connection from the server explorer and select the Data Source
  2. Configure the basic connection properties to access your account data.


Explore real-time data! This JDBC Driver makes it easy to access live data directly from any modern Java IDE.

  1. After configuring the connection, explore the tables, views, and stored procedures provided by the JDBC Driver.
  2. These constructs return live UK data that developers can work with directly from within the IDE.


Categories: Open Source

Google AdWords JDBC Driver

Date Created: June 25, 2015 - 11:29Date Updated: June 26, 2015 - 09:34Submitted by: CData Software

The Google AdWords JDBC Driver is a powerful tool that allows you to easily connect-to live Google Adwords data through any JDBC capable application or tool! With the Driver users can access Google Adwords the same way that they would connect to any other JDBC data source. The Drivers are completely self-contained; no additional software installation is required.

Enterprise-class JDBC Connectivity

The Google AdWords JDBC Driver offers the most natural way to access Google Adwords data from any Java/J2EE application. Simply use the Google AdWords Driver to connect and access data just as you would access any traditional database. The drivers is completely self-contained - no additional software installation is required!


*/ Connect To Google Adwords From BI, ETL, & Reporting Tools

JDBC is the most widely supported interface for connecting Java-based applications with data. All kinds of BI, Reporting, ETL, Database, and Analytics tools offer the ability to read and write data via JDBC connectivity.


*/
  • Aqua Data Studio
  • Cisco Information Server
  • CloverETL
  • ColdFusion
  • Crystal Reports
  • DBeaver
  • DbVisualizer
  • IBM WebSphere
  • Informatica
  • IntelliJ
  • JBoss
  • Jetty
  • KNIME
  • NetBeans IDE
  • Oracle WebLogic
  • Oracle WareHouse Builder
  • RazorSQL
  • ... and many more!

The Google AdWords Driver wraps the complexity of accessing Google Adwords services in an easy-to-integrate, pure Java JDBC Driver. Applications then access Google Adwords through the Google AdWords Driver with simple Transact-SQL.

The CData JDBC Driver for Google AdWords hides the complexity of accessing data and provides additional powerful security features, smart caching, batching, socket management, and more.

 

Eclipse Integration - Data Explorer

This JDBC Driver can be used to access and explore data directly from the Data Source Explorers included in popular java IDEs.


It's easy! Developers can connect the Data Source Explorer to the JDBC Driver, just like connecting to any standard database.

  1. Add a new Data Connection from the server explorer and select the Data Source
  2. Configure the basic connection properties to access your account data.


Explore real-time data! This JDBC Driver makes it easy to access live data directly from any modern Java IDE.

  1. After configuring the connection, explore the tables, views, and stored procedures provided by the JDBC Driver.
  2. These constructs return live UK data that developers can work with directly from within the IDE.


Categories: Open Source

MS Project JDBC Driver

Date Created: June 25, 2015 - 11:07Date Updated: June 26, 2015 - 09:34Submitted by: CData Software

The MS Project JDBC Driver is a powerful tool that allows you to easily connect-to live Microsoft Project data through any JDBC capable application or tool! With the Driver users can access Microsoft Project the same way that they would connect to any other JDBC data source. The Drivers are completely self-contained; no additional software installation is required.

Enterprise-class JDBC Connectivity

The MS Project JDBC Driver offers the most natural way to access Microsoft Project data from any Java/J2EE application. Simply use the MS Project Driver to connect and access data just as you would access any traditional database. The drivers is completely self-contained - no additional software installation is required!


*/ Connect To Microsoft Project From BI, ETL, & Reporting Tools

JDBC is the most widely supported interface for connecting Java-based applications with data. All kinds of BI, Reporting, ETL, Database, and Analytics tools offer the ability to read and write data via JDBC connectivity.


*/
  • Aqua Data Studio
  • Cisco Information Server
  • CloverETL
  • ColdFusion
  • Crystal Reports
  • DBeaver
  • DbVisualizer
  • IBM WebSphere
  • Informatica
  • IntelliJ
  • JBoss
  • Jetty
  • KNIME
  • NetBeans IDE
  • Oracle WebLogic
  • Oracle WareHouse Builder
  • RazorSQL
  • ... and many more!



The MS Project Driver wraps the complexity of accessing Microsoft Project services in an easy-to-integrate, pure Java JDBC Driver. Applications then access Microsoft Project through the MS Project Driver with simple Transact-SQL.

The CData JDBC Driver for MS Project hides the complexity of accessing data and provides additional powerful security features, smart caching, batching, socket management, and more.

 

Eclipse Integration - Data Explorer

This JDBC Driver can be used to access and explore data directly from the Data Source Explorers included in popular java IDEs.


It's easy! Developers can connect the Data Source Explorer to the JDBC Driver, just like connecting to any standard database.

  1. Add a new Data Connection from the server explorer and select the Data Source
  2. Configure the basic connection properties to access your account data.


Explore real-time data! This JDBC Driver makes it easy to access live data directly from any modern Java IDE.

  1. After configuring the connection, explore the tables, views, and stored procedures provided by the JDBC Driver.
  2. These constructs return live UK data that developers can work with directly from within the IDE.


Categories: Open Source

Sage 50 UK JDBC Driver

Date Created: June 25, 2015 - 09:47Date Updated: June 26, 2015 - 09:34Submitted by: CData Software

The Sage 50 UK JDBC Driver is a powerful tool that allows you to easily connect-to live Sage 50 UK data through any JDBC capable application or tool! With the Driver users can access Sage 50 UK the same way that they would connect to any other JDBC data source. The Drivers are completely self-contained; no additional software installation is required.

Enterprise-class JDBC Connectivity

The Sage 50 UK JDBC Driver offers the most natural way to access Sage 50 UK data from any Java/J2EE application. Simply use the Sage 50 UK Driver to connect and access data just as you would access any traditional database. The drivers is completely self-contained - no additional software installation is required!


*/ Connect To Sage 50 UK From BI, ETL, & Reporting Tools

JDBC is the most widely supported interface for connecting Java-based applications with data. All kinds of BI, Reporting, ETL, Database, and Analytics tools offer the ability to read and write data via JDBC connectivity.


*/
  • Aqua Data Studio
  • Cisco Information Server
  • CloverETL
  • ColdFusion
  • Crystal Reports
  • DBeaver
  • DbVisualizer
  • IBM WebSphere
  • Informatica
  • IntelliJ
  • JBoss
  • Jetty
  • KNIME
  • NetBeans IDE
  • Oracle WebLogic
  • Oracle WareHouse Builder
  • RazorSQL
  • ... and many more!

The Sage 50 UK Driver wraps the complexity of accessing Sage 50 UK services in an easy-to-integrate, pure Java JDBC Driver. Applications then access Sage 50 UK through the Sage 50 UK Driver with simple Transact-SQL.

The CData JDBC Driver for Sage 50 UK hides the complexity of accessing data and provides additional powerful security features, smart caching, batching, socket management, and more.

 

Eclipse Integration - Data Explorer

This JDBC Driver can be used to access and explore data directly from the Data Source Explorers included in popular java IDEs.


It's easy! Developers can connect the Data Source Explorer to the JDBC Driver, just like connecting to any standard database.

  1. Add a new Data Connection from the server explorer and select the Data Source
  2. Configure the basic connection properties to access your account data.


Explore real-time data! This JDBC Driver makes it easy to access live data directly from any modern Java IDE.

  1. After configuring the connection, explore the tables, views, and stored procedures provided by the JDBC Driver.
  2. These constructs return live UK data that developers can work with directly from within the IDE.


Categories: Open Source

Impressions from the European Lisp Symposium, Goldsmith University April 2015

Google Open Source Blog - Wed, 06/24/2015 - 22:50
Martin Cracauer is a software engineer for Google’s Travel team and a dedicated Lisp enthusiast. Below, he shares his impressions of the recent European Lisp Symposium.
In April, I attended the 8th European Lisp Symposium in London. It was good to be there and I'm proud to have played a part by giving a talk about unwanted memory retention.

More than anything, I was struck by the professionalism of the performance-oriented Lisp programmers giving talks. The Lisp community has moved beyond fighting with their compilers and settling for a couple useless microoptimizations. At a modern Lisp conference like this one, the same terms used at any other performance computing conference rain down upon the audience. There isn't a generic "probably didn't fit the cache" -- now we talk specific caches and line counts. We don't say "swapping" -- we give specific counts of major and minor page faults and recognize the relative cost of each. We have a deep awareness of what will end up being a system call, and which ones are cheap in which OS.  I had a lot of interest at the 2006 European Common Lisp Meeting by describing how ITA uses Lisp only at compile time and gets full performance at runtime. In 2015, that’s just normal.

There’s still work to do, however. It’s not there yet, but I think Lisp should become the ideal language for both SIMD computing (via new primitives allowing the programmer to tell the compiler instead of relying on arbitrarily smart compilers) and for speculative execution (allow the programmer to make promises and crash if they turn out untrue). I'm always hoping somebody (else) will kick off that effort.

The second thing that struck me was how much people at this conference leverage two of Lisp’s major advantages:

  • compile time computing (having the full runtime language at compile time to expand your compiled code from whatever abstraction is most suitable)
  • and the "commandline", the REPL, inside a high performance language


Several presenters combined those features to construct 3D objects, and even built a bridge between computed 3D objects and interactively built objects (in a graphical editor). One of those sessions was Dave Cooper’s tutorial. Both could create sets of 3D objects that mixed computed objects and interactive building at an astonishing rate.

Breanndán Ó Nualláin’s talk, "Executable Pseudocode for Graph Algorithms", was useful to me because it gave a digestible example of more complex compile time computing. It’s difficult to illustrate the concept, but Breanndán used Lisp’s power as a "programmable programming language" to make a frontend that expresses pseudocode for algorithms in an optimized s-expression syntax. The result is readable, executable, and fast. In addition, you can easily create a backend that targets LaTeX so that you could put your running algorithm in a textbook. This is so useful when trying to understand what the power of a "programmable programming language" really means. Now your LaTex for the algorithms paper is derived from proven working code.

To me, the most jaw-dropping talk of the conference was Christian E. Schafmeister’s "Clasp - A Common Lisp that Interoperates with C++ and Uses the LLVM Backend". The title is the understatement of the year. What is going on here is building tiny 3-nanometer protein-like structures to do useful things like cure cancer and destroy sarin. Although many C++ libraries exist for building such structures, it would be too painful to glue them all together in C++. Instead of feeding C++ through a layer of C and back into some object representation (like the rest of us, cough) Christian presented a Common Lisp implementation running in LLVM, using the LLVM runtime libraries that provide introspection to directly interface to C++. He was kind enough to give the talk again at our Google Cambridge office where it was recorded.

At large scale, Lisp exposes some rough spots. A lot of Googlers like really clean modularization, but Common Lisp packages don't quite provide it. This used to be a big problem for CMUCL, reducing the number of people who could build it. Robert Strandh talked about “First-class Global Environments in Common Lisp”. I am sure people would love to see that in SBCL. I also liked Paul van der Walt's talk, bringing forward ideas to improve restricted runtime environments (such as mobile devices) while keeping them easy to describe in their dependencies.

In my own talk on “Unwanted Memory Retention”, I didn’t just limit the discussion to Lisp, SBCL, and its garbage collector. I addressed group culture and perception bias: how imbalanced performance tradeoffs come about in long-running software projects, how they mix with rapid changes in the computing environment around your Lisp, and how Lisp is just a bit more flexible dealing with them.

This conference was an enlightening experience and I hope slides and videos will become available. For now, many of the topics covered are also discussed in the Symposium’s peer-reviewed papers (16MB PDF). But honestly, just reading doesn't do justice to the conference. People there were great presenters, too, and attending it was inspirational.

by Martin Cracauer, Travel team

2015-06-24 Edited to clarify the subject of Martin's 2006 talk.
Categories: Open Source

Eclipse Ships Tenth Annual Release Train

Eclipse News - Wed, 06/24/2015 - 16:00
The Mars release is now available. Download it today!
Categories: Open Source

Introducing HypoPG, hypothetical indexes for PostgreSQL

PostgreSQL News - Wed, 06/24/2015 - 01:00

Paris, June 24 2015

DALIBO is proud to present the first release of HypoPG, an extension that adds hypothetical indexes in PostgreSQL.

An hypothetical index is an index which doesn't exists on disk. It's thefore almost instant to create and doesn't add any IO cost, wether at creation time or at maintenance time. The goal is obviously to check if an index is useful before spending many time, I/O and disk space to create it.

With this extension, you can create hypothetical indexes, and then with EXPLAIN check if PostgreSQL would use them or not.

What if I had an Index on this ?

Did you ever wonder how an index would increase the performances of your server, but you couldn't afford the time to create it on disk just for the sake of trying ?

Here's how HypoPG can help:

First let's create a simple use case:

# CREATE TABLE testable 
#   AS SELECT id, 'line ' || id val 
#   FROM generate_series(1,1000000) id;
# ANALYZE testable ;

Now let's install HypoPG and create an hypothetical index on this new table

# CREATE EXTENSION hypopg;
# SELECT hypopg_create_index('CREATE INDEX ON testable (id)');

You can now use EXPLAIN (without ANALYZE) to check if PostgreSQL would use that index !

# EXPLAIN SELECT * FROM testable WHERE id = 1000 ;
                                          QUERY PLAN
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 Index Scan using 41079_btree_testable_id on testable  (cost=0.05..8.07 rows=1 width=15)
   Index Cond: (id = 1000)
(2 rows)

Yay ! If there were an index on the 'id' column, PostgreSQL would take advantage of it !

Links About DALIBO :

DALIBO is the leading PostgreSQL company in France, providing support, trainings and consulting to its customers since 2005. The company contributes to the PostgreSQL community in various ways, including : code, articles, translations, free conferences and workshops

Check out DALIBO's open source projects at http://dalibo.github.io.

http://www.dalibo.com

Categories: Database, Open Source

Easier provisioning of Google Apps accounts for your domain

Google Open Source Blog - Mon, 06/22/2015 - 18:44
Creating a large number of Google Apps accounts (for Work or for Education) can be challenging. Today, we are introducing a new API to generate available usernames and create Google Apps accounts in your domain: Account provisioning for Google Apps. We are releasing the implementation of this API as open source under Google's GitHub organization. It can be installed as a RESTful service or Java library and can be used in a website where users create their own accounts or in a script that creates accounts in bulk.Each user selects and creates their account (included under demos)
Account provisioning for Google Apps uses configurable patterns to generate usernames based on first name, last name and optional custom fields (e.g. second last name). For example: for someone named "Carlos Alvarez Martinez", the pattern [C1_firstname].[lastname][C1_secondlastname] will generate the username c.alvarezm. Further custom fields can be defined (e.g. [studentId]) and a list of patterns can be configured to generate multiple available usernames. In addition, this API caches existent usernames, so it's fast and prevents hitting Admin SDK API limits.Accounts are created in bulk (included under demos)
by Miguel Alvarez, Enterprise team
Categories: Open Source

Dojo Recap – Week Ending June 19, 2015

The Dojo Toolkit - Announcements - Mon, 06/22/2015 - 15:36

Last week we made progress on several features for Dojo 2! Thanks for helping us get a few steps closer to Dojo 2, it would not be possible without your help. Let us know if you would like to get involved!

Last week in Dojo 2

Our current focus is on the packages in Dojo 2 platform. Last week we made progress completing initial alpha versions of several key features and packages:

Core Loader Routing Crypto This week’s Dojo 2 efforts

There are many things we have to do to complete Dojo 2. We’ve identified a few of our aspirations for the upcoming week towards making progress on Dojo 2. If you’re interested in helping out in these areas, or other parts of Dojo 2, just let us know, either in the comments or on IRC.

Core
  • Refine the release script
  • Review open pull requests
  • Miscellaneous code clean-up and bug fixes as they arise
DOM
  • Address bugs, if any are reported
Routing
  • Begin reviews on the router. If anyone in the community is strong with routing, we welcome their feedback on the initial pull request!
  • Routing proposal cleanup, as needed.
Loader
  • Continue development on functional tests for Loader
  • Refine the release scripts based on feedback
Crypto
  • Continue work on Hash and HMAC
i18n
  • Create initial repo and plan initial development
dstore
  • Set up branch to convert to TypeScript and start using Dojo 2 platform packages
Weekly IRC meeting

As usual, our weekly IRC meeting is on irc.freenode.net #dojo-meeting at 9am Pacific time on Tuesday.

Last week we discussed
  • Various open challenges
  • Current progress on platform packages

View the Dojo weekly meeting logs

This week’s agenda
  • Review Dojo 1.11 flat theme efforts
  • Discuss open challenges
Thanks!

Thanks to everyone for their valuable contributions this past week, we’re starting to see many things come together for Dojo 2 platform alpha! Please let us know if you plan to work on any features, or would like to get involved, so we can collaborate efficiently!

Categories: Open Source, RIA

Project of the Week, June 22, 2015

SourceForge.net: Front page news - Mon, 06/22/2015 - 06:08

Here are the featured projects for the week, which appear on the front page of SourceForge.net:


usm

Usm is a unified slackware package manager that handles automatic dependency resolution. It unifies various package repositories including slackware, slacky, ponce, salix, and alien. It also supports slackbuilds.org, and will build from source.
[ Download usm ]


PostInstallerF

PostInstallerF will install all the software that Fedora doesn’t include by default, after running Fedora for the first time. It’s easy for a new user. PostInstallerF contains everything that you need for your daily computing.
[ Download PostInstallerF ]


Cyberfox

Cyberfox is a Mozilla-based Internet browser designed to take advantage of 64-bit architecture but a 32-bit version is also available. The application provides a higher performance when navigating your favorite pages. Compatible With Windows Vista x64, Windows 7 x64, and Windows 8/8.x OS. Cyberfox uses windows 8 SDK.
[ Download Cyberfox ]


Hugin

Panorama stitching and much more. A powerful software package for creation and processing of immersive panoramic images.
[ Download Hugin ]


ImperiumAO

ImperiumAO is a popular Massive Multiplayer Online Role-Play Game (MMORPG), developed using BaronSoft’s ORE engine, and currently being ported to a brand new SDL-C++ programmed engine. The game is set up on a huge medieval fantasy world, and it has multiple worldwide located servers with more than 100,000 active players around the globe.
[ Download ImperiumAO ]


NAPS2 (Not Another PDF Scanner 2)

NAPS2 is a document scanning application with a focus on simplicity and ease of use. Scan your documents from WIA- and TWAIN-compatible scanners, organize the pages as you like, and save them as PDF, TIFF, JPEG, PNG, and other file formats. It requires .NET Framework 4.0 or higher. NAPS2 is currently available in 19 different languages. This is a fork of the NAPS project with many bug fixes and other improvements.
[ Download NAPS2 (Not Another PDF Scanner 2) ]


DxWnd

Windows hooker intercepts system calls to make full-screen programs running in a window, to support a better compatibility, to enhance video modes, and to stretch timing. It is typically very useful for running old windows games.
[ Download DxWnd ]


Uniform Server

The Uniform Server is a lightweight server solution for running a web server under the WindowsOS. Less than 24MB! It is a modular design, and includes the latest versions of Apache2, Perl5, PHP (switch between PHP53, PHP54, PHP55 or PHP56), MySQL5 or MariaDB5, and phpMyAdmin or Adminer4. It can be run from either a hard drive or USB memory stick.  No installation required! No registry dust! Just unpack and fire up!
[ Download Uniform Server ]


digiCamControl

digiCamControl is a free and Open Source software that allows you to control camera shooting parameters, and also to save time by transferring images directly from your camera to your computer as you take each shot.
[ Download digiCamControl ]

Categories: Open Source

Project mirroring policies will be revisited with our Community Panel, existing mirrors removed

SourceForge.net: Front page news - Thu, 06/18/2015 - 17:50

Recent community concerns have triggered an extensive internal review of our mirroring program and how mirrored content is used on SourceForge. In light of this review, third-party bundling of mirrored content was discontinued May 27th.  As of June 18th, we have taken a further step in removing SourceForge-maintained mirrored projects, and are engaging our newly-formed Community Panel to discuss site features and program policies including a redesigned mirror program.

SourceForge was established in 1999 as a site for Open Source software development and now hosts more than 400,000 Open Source projects. Part of our long-standing mission has been the preservation of access to Open Source software source code. Since at least 2010, SourceForge has operated initiatives that mirror important externally-hosted software to our site. As of June 17th, our mirrored project catalog contained 295 projects (<0.07% of our total catalog).

Recently, community concerns were sparked by a short-run test of third-party offers on five of the mirrored projects. This test was promptly discontinued on May 27th based on community feedback, which we appreciate and take very seriously. With that in mind, SourceForge pledges to present third-party offers only with the projects that explicitly opted-in to that program.

We are taking further steps to amend our practices:

Mirrors which are not co-maintained with the one or more of the original developers, except where the upstream site has been discontinued, have been removed effective immediately. An extensive review has been conducted of the 295 mirrored projects and removals were completed on June 18th. Where a SourceForge-maintained mirror has been removed, we have redirected this traffic back to the canonical home for the software (whence it was mirrored to begin with).

We are forming a Community Panel to review our mirroring practices and guide the way mirrors are established and the presentation of mirrored content on the site. We will examine the best ways to respect an author’s Trademarks and Copyrights while distributing the software they have released under Open Source license, and making clear when pages relate to mirrored content.  We continue to believe that mirroring is an important component of the Open Source ecosystem – both in ensuring that software is preserved for developers and in combating malicious patent claims – and we want to make sure our mirroring is performed in a sustainable and beneficial way.

We welcome your feedback and can be reached via the SourceForge Community Voice forum.

Roberto Galoppini, Head of SourceForge Community team

Categories: Open Source

Google Code-in Wrap-up: Beyond the winners...

Google Open Source Blog - Thu, 06/18/2015 - 17:00
To conclude our series of posts about Google Code-in (GCI) 2014, we have an inspiring story from FOSSASIA mentor Praveen Patil. Although we’ve been shining a well-deserved spotlight on the contest winners -- including the two from FOSSASIA -- GCI is also about helping students take their very first steps toward becoming contributors to open source projects. For some students this year, GCI was even more than that: it was a first step toward essential computer literacy and the new possibilities it opens up for them.

December 2014 and January 2015 marked FOSSASIA’s first time participating in Google Code-in (GCI). Attending the FOSSASIA conference in February 2014 was a life-changing experience for me, and I spent the summer contributing to a FOSSASIA-sponsored project during the 2014 Google Summer of Code. Mario Behling and Hong Phuc, the mentors who helped me complete my project, asked me to take part in GCI with them and help pre-university students take their first steps into the world of free and open source software.
Ahead of the contest’s start, I began spreading the word about GCI with presentations at local schools and through online social networks. But when the contest began on December 1st, I noticed that most of my tasks had been claimed by students outside of India and that there was hardly any response from students of my own institute or the neighboring pre-university colleges. The few local students we did see participating were finding it difficult to complete even the beginner tasks, and none claimed any tasks in the coding category. So we began trying to understand why and see what we could do about it.
Ours is a small city in south India and we found that the main reason students weren’t participating was a lack of IT infrastructure in schools. Less than 1% of high school students have access to computers and the internet. They get a chance to learn coding after high school in the 11th standard, but only if they’ve opted to study computer science. In rural India, the situation is even worse. I realized that students are willing to participate in programs like GCI, but most are unable to do so because they lack even basic computer skills.
With suggestions and guidance from Mario and Hong Phuc, we organized a series of workshops at my home for students on every Saturday, Sunday and holiday. The first workshop in the series was “An Introduction to Free and Open Source Software and Google Code-in”. More than 100 students turned out for the session. We also held a session on installing Gnu/Linux and software like Libre Office, Gimp, Inkscape, and more. I was happy to see students engaged with FOSS, learning ‘til late in the evening even though their final exams were approaching.

Our next few workshops focused on using FOSS for documentation, basic image processing, designing, blogging, and an introduction to Python. These interactive sessions helped develop confidence and motivation in our students. More than 70 students registered for GCI! Many said that it was the first time they’d been able to have hands-on experience with computers and that they enjoyed learning and creating.

Many of our friends helped us by providing laptops, internet dongles, a projector, and -- most importantly -- their valuable time. My best friend (and better half) Minal Patil provided snacks for students and helped us conduct the workshops. We even had a GCI session on Christmas Day and celebrated in a different and meaningful way.
It was amazing to see the happiness on the face of students when they completed their first GCI tasks. After starting with no previous hands-on experience with computers, many were able to complete beginner tasks related to documentation and outreach. Some could create blogs and write about themselves and their GCI experiences. And a few students were even able to contribute to our open source project ExpEYES (Experiments for Young Engineers and Scientists) which turns a $35 Raspberry Pi computer into a lab for conducting science experiments. Some students also worked on building a small website about our group intended to give the students an opportunity to experience open source development culture.
It was great fun to learn new things every day along with the students, and it was incredibly fulfilling when the GCI 2014 results were announced on Google’s Open Source Blog. FOSSASIA had more completed tasks than any other participating organization, with 587 tasks completed by 174 students. And our school, Govindram Seksaria Science P.U. College, Belgaum (GSS), ranked #2 among 397 schools worldwide for participation with 49 students completing tasks. The school’s management were happy to learn about our success with GCI, displaying a congratulatory banner on the campus, and they are exploring ways to work with FOSSASIA to continue helping students in our region learn to code and contribute to FOSS.

Participating in GCI with FOSSASIA was a great learning experience for myself also, and I’m very grateful to Hong Phuc, Mario Behling, and the Google Open Source Programs Office. You have inspired me to take up this task of helping kids from this region to learn to code as a lifelong mission. Thanks a billion to all the students who participated in the contest, and I wish them a great future ahead.

by Praveen Patil, GSoC alumnus and GCI mentor
Categories: Open Source

Red Hat JBoss Developer Studio (Mars)

Date Created: June 18, 2015 - 09:47Date Updated: June 22, 2015 - 13:21Submitted by: JBoss Tools

Red Hat JBoss Developer Studio 9 is available as both a fully bundled Eclipse distribution and a single installable feature on the Eclipse Marketplace.

Includes the majority of JBoss Tools 4.3, plus all its needed dependencies and 3rd party plugins, allowing for an easy one-click and no-fuss installation.

JBoss Developer Studio includes support for JBoss and related technologies, such as Hibernate, JBoss AS, CDI, Aerogear Hybrid Mobile, Apache Cordova, JSF, (X)HTML, Maven, and more.

For a quick overview, see JBoss Developer Studio: jQuery Mobile. More videos here: http://docs.jboss.org/tools/movies/

See also: http://www.redhat.com/products/jbossenterprisemiddleware/developer-studio/

This release was built with Eclipse 4.5 (Mars), but should also work with future Eclipse 4.5.x versions.

Mars JEE bundle recommended: http://www.eclipse.org/downloads/packages/eclipse-ide-java-ee-developers...

NOTE: Java 8 is required.

Categories: Open Source

JBoss Tools (Mars)

Date Created: June 18, 2015 - 09:29Date Updated: June 22, 2015 - 16:22Submitted by: JBoss Tools

JBoss Tools 4.3 is an umbrella project for a set of Eclipse Mars plugins that includes support for JBoss and related technologies, such as Hibernate, JBoss AS, CDI, Aerogear Hybrid Mobile, Apache Cordova, FeedHenry, JSF, (X)HTM5, Maven, and more.

NOTE: Eclipse 4.5 (Mars) and Java 8 are required.

This entry has the majority of JBoss Tools but does not include features that requires dependencies outside of what is common from Eclipse JEE and m2eclipse.

Mars JEE bundle recommended: http://www.eclipse.org/downloads/packages/eclipse-ide-java-ee-developers...

Categories: Open Source

RCPTT - Eclipse UI Testing Tool

Date Created: June 18, 2015 - 04:04Date Updated: June 19, 2015 - 03:48Submitted by: Ulyana Skorokhodova [Xored Inc.]

RCP Testing Tool is a project for GUI testing automation of Eclipse-based applications.
RCPTT is fully aware about Eclipse Platform's internals, hiding this complexity from end users and allowing QA engineers to create highly reliable UI tests at great pace.

  • Continuous IntegrationTest Runner runs tests locally and in integration with Jenkins, Hudson, or other CI tools.
  • Test case creation productivity – ability to record user actions at the same level of efficiency as manual script creation, ability to capture initial/final application state into reusable models for further state restoring/verification.
  • First class support of Eclipse technologies – testing tool should be aware about key concepts of Eclipse Platform, including but not limited to Workspace, Workbench, Preferences, Debug API, as well as understand the underlying UI structure, like parts of Eclipse Workbench (views, editors, toolbars) and structure of GEF/GMF/Graphiti diagrams.
  • Intelligent runtime – automatic wait of UI-triggered background asynchronous operations (including jobs, display async/timer execs, decorations, databindings, text reconcilers, text hovers, and so on)
  • Reliable results – elemination of false negatives and false positives by isolation of test cases from each other, independence on screen size/operating system, etc.
  • Maintainability – test case artifacts should be easily modifyable to reflect UI changes and be version control system friendly
  • Extensibility – provide APIs for extending tool in order to support custom widgets, contexts, reports and async primitives.
Categories: Open Source

Case Study: ApacheGUI

The Dojo Toolkit - Announcements - Wed, 06/17/2015 - 16:58

The large companies that use Dojo are widely known. This series features lesser known users of Dojo, and their stories. This time, we interview Jonathan Rossi of ApacheGUI, an open source, Java-based, Apache HTTP Server GUI.

ApacheGUI Control

Q: How did you first learn about Dojo?

A: I learned about Dojo from a co-worker who showed me a simple front end interface that was built to modify a data grid on the screen. The interface looked very professional and easy to use. It also had a lot of advanced components such as modifying the data on the grid and updating a back end database in real time without refreshing the page. My co-worker was not a front-end developer, however they managed to build a very professional front end widget with advanced front-end techniques. This got me interested in Dojo.

Q: Why did you choose Dojo?

A: I chose Dojo for two reasons:

  1. Dojo is built with an object oriented nature. All widgets are modelled as objects that can easily be extended to add custom functionality. I also like Dojo’s way of modelling classes over the vanilla JavaScript prototypical inheritance.
  2. Dojo supports a very vast set of widgets out of the box. Most of my day job is as a front-end developer, I understand how time consuming it can be to build UI widgets. Dojo is a toolkit with pre-built widgets that I can plug into my application. This saved me a lot of time in developing my application.
Q: Were you previously using another toolkit?

A: I have used jQuery UI in the past. I chose Dojo over jQuery UI due to the 2 reasons above.

Q: What does your application or service do?

A: My application provides a front end UI to manage the Apache HTTP server. The Apache HTTP server is still the most widely used http server on the internet. The application runs inside of a web browser with a desktop like interface.

Q: How does your application use Dojo?

A: Most of the front end UI is built with a set of Dojo Widgets. The code is also structured using the Dojo class declaration mechanism.

Q: Overall what is your experience with Dojo?

A: Dojo does have a steep learning curve. It is a toolkit that is really meant for seasoned developers that understand Object Oriented principles and how to simplify a large application into a collection of components. If you are this type of developer, then Dojo is a dream to use. In my opinion it is not meant for a new front-end developer who reads a set of simple online tutorials and would like to get a website up and running immediately.

Q: What are your future plans with Dojo?

A: I will continue to use Dojo in my application. There is nothing out there quite like Dojo so there is no reason to use another toolkit.

Screenshots of ApacheGUI

Additional screenshots are available via the ApacheGUI website.

Thanks!

Thanks Jonathan for telling us about your experience with Dojo. If you would like to share your experience with Dojo, please contact us.

Categories: Open Source, RIA