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Java

Info-Tech Vendor Landscape: Virtual Backup Software

Java Developer's Journal - 1 hour 35 min ago
This independent report from Info-Tech evaluates and scores 14 companies in the Virtual Machine Backup market. It can help you understand what's new in the virtual backup market, evaluate virtual backup vendors and products for your needs and determine which products are most appropriate for your organization. Find out why Symantec was named a “Champion” in virtual backup software.

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Categories: Java, Media

Why the Network Is Critical to Cloud Success

Java Developer's Journal - 6 hours 50 min ago
It’s certainly no secret that cloud solutions have become an important and increasingly necessary part of how companies do business today. For enterprises, implementing cloud-based services can help boost productivity, enhance efficiency and reduce costs. Private cloud solutions take the cloud concept one step further: A private cloud configuration looks and acts like the public cloud, giving enterprises the same levels of speed, agility and cost savings – but in a far more secure environment in which dedicated bandwidth and security are guaranteed.

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Categories: Java, Media

Internet of Things Power Panel @ThingsExpo

Java Developer's Journal - Sun, 07/27/2014 - 23:00
“At Cloud Expo in NYC last week I sat in on the Internet of Things power panel and then presented about how to monetize the Internet of Things. The room was packed, standing room only and I stuck around for a full 30 minutes afterwards answering questions before I had to tear myself away. Wow, I have to say I’ve never seen so much buzz about anything. And this isn’t my first rodeo. The interest in all things IoT is nothing short of amazing, and we’ve only just begun. Take a look!”

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Categories: Java, Media

DevOps and Cloud: Tips and Techniques to Revolutionize Your SDLC

Java Developer's Journal - Sun, 07/27/2014 - 20:00
Cloud computing started a technology revolution; now DevOps is driving that revolution forward. By enabling new approaches to service delivery, cloud and DevOps together are delivering even greater speed, agility, and efficiency. No wonder leading innovators are adopting DevOps and cloud together! In his session at DevOps Summit, Andi Mann, Vice President of Strategic Solutions at CA Technologies, will explore the synergies in these two approaches, with practical tips, techniques, research data, war stories, case studies, and recommendations.

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Categories: Java, Media

Big Data Needs a Thought Collective

Java Developer's Journal - Sun, 07/27/2014 - 20:00
Sharing data is a cornerstone of the scientific method because it makes it possible to replicate work. That foundation is mostly absent from data science, which makes obtaining and reusing knowledge more difficult than it should be. Job postings for data scientists increased 15,000 percent between 2011 and 2012, and Gartner predicted that 63% of organizations would invest in Big Data this year. The communications, consumer, education, financial, healthcare, government, manufacturing, and retail sectors are all adopting business practices that are using data science to inform their activities and improve operations.

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Categories: Java, Media

How Small Business Can Leverage the Internet of Things

Java Developer's Journal - Sun, 07/27/2014 - 18:00
In 1999, technology pioneer Kevin Ashton coined the phrase "Internet of Things" (IoT) to refer to the concept of "connecting any device with an on and off switch to the Internet (and/or to each other). This includes everything from cell phones, coffee makers, washing machines, headphones, wearable devices and almost anything else you can think of." The IoT can also encompass car and plane engines, gas and oil wells, fitness tracking devices, and thermostats. In a 2014 New York Times article, writer Jeremy Rifkin stated, "Today more than 11 billion sensors are attached to natural resources, production lines, the electricity grid, logistics networks and recycling flows, and implanted in homes, offices, stores and vehicles, feeding big data into the Internet of Things. By 2020, it is projected that at least 50 billion sensors will connect to it." Although large companies and startup tech companies are the primary users right now, McKinsey Global Institute estimates that the IoT business will deliver $6.2 trillion in revenue by 2025.

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Categories: Java, Media

IoT Manufacturing "Bigger" Opportunity

Java Developer's Journal - Sun, 07/27/2014 - 17:15
I had a fun conversation with Mark Van Rijmenam (@VanRijmenam) a couple of weeks ago about cloud computing, Big Data, and the IoT. Mark runs BigData-Startups.com in Den Haag, Netherlands. We were mutually amused that he had chosen the name Think Bigger for his new book just as I had chosen that name for a recent IoT piece. His book is now out, and can be found on Amazon. Mark sees as I do, an enormous opportunity for manufacturers with Big Data and IoT. He lives in a region of Europe known as the Randstad, encompassing 7 million people within 3,200 square miles across the cities and metro regions of Amsterdam, Den Haag, Rotterdam, and Utrecht. It's one of the great manufacturing centers of the world. Given my roots and current base within the US Industrial Heartland, it seems that Mark and I share a similar point of view about the challenges and opportunities facing manufacturing in the developed world. Despite the recent decades of the Information Age and increasing global emphasis on a service-oriented economy, I've long believe that you still have to make stuff to succeed. Carpe Diem The IoT shows a way for manufacturers to seize industrial leadership again or for the first time. Mark seems to agree. As he wrote recently, “for manufacturers, IoT will mean using sensor data to optimize manufacturing processes and improving products.” He quotes, Stefan Groschupf, CEO of Big Data Startup Datameer, who says that manufacturers need to “investigate and implement Big Data solutions to optimize processes, pull away from their competitors and ultimately save massive amounts of time and money.” “However,” Mark writes, “a 2013 survey by the American Society for Quality (ASQ) showed that currently only 13% of the manufacturers surveyed have made (parts of) their factories smart. Those organizations that did implement sensors, 82% said to have experienced increased efficiency, 49% noticed fewer product defects and 45% experienced higher customer satisfaction.” “Another survey by ARM Holdings among 779 business leaders showed that 23% believe that the IoT will change their business or strategy. In addition, 30% believe that the IoT will unlock new products and services from existing products and services.” “So, although the results are significant, still very few organizations making their organization smart.” He also notes that doing so “is probably just a matter of time, (as) the ARM survey also revealed that 95% believe their company will be using IoT in three years.” Very Real Mark thus believes “the connected world – the Internet of Things – is becoming a very real phenomenon, and some technology companies are trying to take the lead. The latest example is of course Google with its billion-dollar acquisition of Nest, the startup that produces intelligent thermostats capable of understanding and analyzing users’ behavior by analyzing light levels, activity, humidity and temperature among other things. Also Google’s self-driving, connected, car gives us an idea where we are heading. Or what about Apple’s new iBeacon technology that could significantly change our shopping experience?” Mark also writes about the potential of sensors to help cities innovate. He cites an example of Santander, Spain, “which has buried 12.000 sensors under the asphalt, affixed to street lamps and atop city buses. These sensors are a Proof of Concept by the European Commission to test how sensors can make European cities smart. Innovative solutions created with these sensors include street signs that display real-time parking information, up-to-the-minute information on road closures, parking availability, bus delays or the pollen count.” “Local shop owners have even joined the game and allow citizens to place orders when passing by, even when the shop is closed.” How Big Again? This is all great stuff, and also points to the difficulty in measuring “how big” the IoT really is. As I've written before, I don't care. “Walang pakialam,” as my friends in the Philippines say. Mark, in his writings, has addressed the money issue from the expense side. Answering his own question – “But how can organizations turn the data from these sensors in real money?” – he writes, “there are several important aspects that organizations need to take into account when joining the IoT movement. (For example,) the best results are achieved when sensors are installed throughout the supply chain and data is shared as much as possible within that vertical. This could result to more efficient and intelligent processes that benefit each player within the supply chain.” “When for example materials are equipped with sensors, they can be tracked throughout the supply chain and smart-machines can talk to each other to optimize processes.” He is clear that working such magic is “not an easy task, let alone cheap,” noting the upfront costs, maintenance and support costs, and need for highly skilled analysts for all of the new Big Data being generated.” I haven't had the chance yet to read his book, but I imagine he encourages people to think bigger as they meet and rise to these latter challenges, on their way to paving the 21st century information superhighway with the things they need.

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Categories: Java, Media

The Internet of Things, Code Halos and Enterprise Strategies | Part 1

Java Developer's Journal - Sun, 07/27/2014 - 17:00
If you believe as the authors of the new book Code Halos do, that data is the new competitive arena for businesses, then you will want to develop a strategy in order to compete. What might that strategy look like? It may be as simple as, "We believe the better we understand the needs and preferences of our individual prospects and customers, the more convenient and personalized we can make their experiences which leads to happier and more loyal customers that promote our business and help us grow."

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Categories: Java, Media

Internet of @ThingsExpo Silicon Valley Sponsorship Opportunities Available

Java Developer's Journal - Sun, 07/27/2014 - 14:00
Internet of @ThingsExpo, taking place Nov 4-6, 2014, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA, is co-located with 15th Cloud Expo and will feature technical sessions from a rock star conference faculty and the leading industry players in the world. The Internet of Things (IoT) is the most profound change in personal and enterprise IT since the creation of the Worldwide Web more than 20 years ago. All major researchers estimate there will be tens of billions devices – computers, smartphones, tablets, and sensors – connected to the Internet by 2020. This number will continue to grow at a rapid pace for the next several decades.

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Categories: Java, Media

Understanding Application Performance on the Network | Part 6

Java Developer's Journal - Sat, 07/26/2014 - 19:00
In Part V, we discussed processing delays caused by “slow” client and server nodes. In Part VI, we’ll discuss the Nagle algorithm, a behavior that can have a devastating impact on performance and, in many ways, appear to be a processing delay. Beyond being important for (reasonably) accurate packet flow diagrams, understanding “normal” TCP ACK timing can help in the effective diagnosis of certain types of performance problems. These include those introduced by the Nagle algorithm, which we will discuss here, and application windowing, to be discussed in Part VII.

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Categories: Java, Media

Iron Cloud IoT Shootout Announced at @CloudExpo @ThingsExpo Silicon Valley

Java Developer's Journal - Sat, 07/26/2014 - 16:00
Cloud Expo, Inc. has announced the first annual "Iron Cloud IoT Shootout" to be held on November 6, 2014 at Cloud Expo Silicon Valley at Santa Clara Convention Center in California. The "Iron Cloud IoT Shootout" will be a live competition among all the key Cloud Computing platforms, and will be held on Day 3 of the show, Thursday, November 6, at the Santa Clara Convention Center. So far five platforms, Amazon AWS, Google GCE, Microsoft Azure, IBM SoftLayer, and Rackspace have been named as part of the live competition. The "Iron Cloud IoT Shootout" will feature teams representing each platform. Team members may or may not be employees of the companies which represent the competing platforms. Each team will create an IoT app or service, and be judged by everyone in attendance.

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Categories: Java, Media

IBM Exec: "Big Data Is the Phenomenon of Our Time"

Java Developer's Journal - Sat, 07/26/2014 - 15:00
The agreement between IBM and Apple to collaborate on mobility and Big Data will certainly rank as one of the big stories of the year in global enterprise IT. In addition to Apple's devices and IBM's custom apps, an absolute key to this deal will be telecommunications. As we all know, what we call Information Technology (IT) in the US is generally referred to as Information and Communications Technology (ICT) throughout the world, demonstrating telco's importance to the whole enchilada. Thus, we were fortunate to speak about the IBM/Apple deal recently with Robert Fox, IBM's Global Industry Leader for Telecommunications Media & Entertainment. Here's what we asked, and what he had to say: Big Data Journal: Apple CEO Tim Cook mentioned "Big Data Analytics" as a key reason to do business with IBM. From your point of view and IBM's point of view, what strengths to you bring in this area? Bob Fox: The Apple and IBM partnership is all about combining IBM’s Big Data and Analytics capabilities with Apple’s legendary consumer experience, hardware and software integration and developer platform. IBM is the proven leader in Big Data and Analytics with more than 40,000 data and analytics client engagements that spans research and development, solutions, software and hardware. The analytics portfolio is made up of more than 15,000 analytics consultants, 4,000 analytics patents, 6,000 industry solution business partners, and 400 IBM mathematicians who are helping clients use Big Data to transform their business. Over the last ten years, we have been applying these resources to solve mission critical challenges in sales, marketing, operations, fraud, security, and many other functions across the 17 industries on which we focus. BDJ: Big Data is, obviously, nothing without strong telco to deliver it throughout enterprises and the world. What is IBM's vision and execution in the telco aspect of the IBM/Apple agreement? Bob: While communications service providers (CSPs) are rethinking how new networks will be provisioned and managed in order to meet new traffic demands, they are also faced with the need to radically change the way networks are maintained and customers are serviced. Some 76% of CSP enterprise customers report that they are not satisfied and are demanding faster and more efficient service. In the consumer segment, CSPs rank among the lowest in traditional measures of customer satisfaction, including NPS and advocacy. BDJ: So how do you improve this? Robert: Customer satisfaction can be drastically improved in this industry by giving mobile workers in the field access to real-time ticket management, service history or parts inventories in the palm of their hand. To help restore telco’s customer service reputation, IBM and Apple will develop more than 100 enterprise solutions, starting with apps for telecommunications field service personnel. These applications will allow CSPs to deliver the right services the first time, all at lower costs. BDJ: Do have an estimate/projection on the amounts of Big Data than an individual enterprise may be collecting and analyzing? Do you have a global estimate on the growth of Big Data over the next few years? Bob: Thanks to a proliferation of devices and the infusion of technology into all things and processes, the world is generating more than 2.5 billion gigabytes of data every day, and 80 percent of it is unstructured—everything from images, video and audio to social media and a blizzard of impulses from embedded sensors and distributed devices. It is not atypical for a single CSP to collect data on tens of billions of events, yielding a petabyte or more of data to store and analyze--every day! With the market for data and analytics estimated to reach $187 billion by 2015, organizations spanning many industries have become increasingly dependent on data—for recording their business transactions, managing their production lines and defining their growth strategies. The emergence of Big Data is the phenomenon of our time; it is a new natural resource. It is fueled by the proliferation of devices, the rise of social media and the infusion of technology into all things and processes.

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Categories: Java, Media

How to Spruce Up Your Evolved PHP Application

Java Developer's Journal - Sat, 07/26/2014 - 15:00
Do you have a PHP application running and have to deal with inconveniences like lack of scalability, complexity of debugging, and low performance? That’s bad enough! But trust me: you are not alone. I’ve been developing Spelix, a system for cave management, for more than 20 years. It originated from a single user DOS application, and has now emerged into a web application with hundreds of users, used nationwide as the official cave directory in Austria.

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Categories: Java, Media

Harnessing Big Data for Product Improvement

Java Developer's Journal - Sat, 07/26/2014 - 14:30
By adopting HP Vertica, Systems Mechanics improved how their products best deliver business intelligence, analytics streaming, and data analysis. Three years ago, Systems Mechanics Limited used relational databases to assemble and analyze some 20 different data sources in near real-time. But most relational database appliances used 1980s technical approaches, and the ability to connect more data and manage more events capped off. The runway for their business expansion just ended.

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Categories: Java, Media

Octoblu Execs: "Any Device, Any Protocol, Single IoT Platform"

Java Developer's Journal - Fri, 07/25/2014 - 20:15
With Octoblu emerging from stealth mode, it seemed like a good idea to talk to a couple of key people there. We were able to do just that with company co-founders Geir Ramleth and Chris Matthieu. Geir Ramleth serves as CEO. He was named to CIO Magazine's Hall of Fame in 2008, and served as SVP/CIO of the Bechtel Group for more than a decade during his career. Chris Matthieu serves as CTO and has a global reputation as an innovator in emerging technologies. Chris also serves as our Tech Chair at @ThingsExpo. Octoblu will utilize Meshblu (formerly code named SkyNetIM), an open source machine-to-machine (M2M) instant messaging platform that Chris created. Meshblu can be used for the discovery, control and management of any API-based software application, any hardware or appliance, or social media network. Here's what we asked Chris, and here's what he had to say: IOT Journal: This seems like a culmination of a lot of work you've previously done with SkyNet and other projects? How long have you had a vision for IoT connectivity? Chris Matthieu: I've been watching the IoT space evolve for several years now. Our open source SkyNet.im project, which is the basis for Octoblu Meshblu, came from an idea around M2M instant messaging. With a market full of smart devices, sensors, and proprietary protocols, Meshblu will enable any device using any protocol to connect to a single IoT platform capable of discovering and messaging any other device. Before creating SkyNet, I was building Twelephone, the WebRTC-powered Twitter telephone). This project was technically rewarding, but I soon realized that people seem to prefer messaging people throughout the day rather than actually "talking" to people as they work. This led me to the idea of people "chatting" with machines! After numerous strategy sessions with Geir, we realized that both of these ideas (SkyNet and Twelephone) were closely related. However, they are only half of the story. We founded Octoblu to connect, control, and manage the communications and automation across people, things, systems, and clouds. IoT Journal: What are your main technical priorities for the next year or so? Chris: At this point we see the key technology areas for development as being in the areas of security and rights management, building broad and deep connectivity services, and continued hardening and platform flexibility for scalability of deployments. IoT Journal: What key hurdles does the IoT industry face in achieving connectivity across platforms, apps, devices, and other "things”? Chris: Although we will see that cross platform, apps, devices, etc. integration will be simplified, the technical challenges will be how to keep this coordinated and orchestrated in such a manner that we don’t get “lost” in the details. The hurdles will be that we have to also get meaningful integrations in the layers of security, rights management, quality of service and assurance of performance. Geir also had some comments about the company and its relation to the IoT industry and environment: IoT Journal: The IoT does certainly open new universes of possibilities? How chaotic is the connectivity/protocol landscape, and how are you addressing it? Geir Ramleth: Consumer IoT is very fragmented, where each hardware manufacturer has its own applications, with no plan to bridge individual environments. Part of the problem is that today, there are no clear standards or leaders in the connectivity/protocol landscape. This will continue to evolve, and we might eventually see clear winners emerge, such as we did some years ago when we got TCP/IP for networking. However, until then, it will be important that we have services that can operate integration in a heterogeneous environment.We see this as a key role and core advantage for Octoblu, as our platform is built to connect any device using any protocol. IoT Journal: When do you expect to see tangible results of your work, ie, and will it be in M2M, enterprise IT connectivity, personal IoT, or all? Geir: It will be all of the above, as our vision is to connect, control and manage the communications and automation across people, things, systems and clouds. We can’t give too much information at this point on timing, but we expect that the broader based integration in this space will first be seen in the industrial space starting in the fall, and then later “backfill” into the personal environments. IoT Journal: How does your membership in the AllSeen Alliance drive your vision, and how are you contributing to this effort? Geir: The AllSeen Alliance is an important effort to standardize the connectivity/protocol challenges. We fully support that and plan to contribute with resources and free tools to help connect, manage and secure environments. At the same time, we will also assure that we continue supporting older and other emerging efforts.

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Categories: Java, Media

How to Approach Application Failures in Production

Java Developer's Journal - Fri, 07/25/2014 - 14:30
In my recent article, “Software Quality Metrics for your Continuous Delivery Pipeline – Part III – Logging,” I wrote about the good parts and the not-so-good parts of logging and concluded that logging usually fails to deliver what it is so often mistakenly used for: as a mechanism for analyzing application failures in production. In response to the heated debates on reddit.com/r/devops and reddit.com/r/programing, I want to demonstrate the wealth of out-of-the-box insights you could obtain from a single urgent, albeit unspecific log message if you only are equipped with the magic ingredient; full transaction context:

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Categories: Java, Media

Your Next Move During an IT Postmortem Review

Java Developer's Journal - Fri, 07/25/2014 - 14:00
Can a postmortem review help foster a curiosity for innovative possibilities to make application performance better? Blue-sky thinkers may not want to deal with the myriad of details on how to manage the events being generated operationally, but could learn something from this exercise. Consider the major system failures in your organization over the last 12 to 18 months. What if you had a system or process in place to capture those failures and mitigate them from a proactive standpoint preventing them from reoccurring? How much better off would you be if you could avoid the proverbial "Groundhog Day" with system outages?

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Categories: Java, Media

Setting the Stage for Cybersecurity with Threat Intelligence

Java Developer's Journal - Fri, 07/25/2014 - 13:00
Ransomware is the latest example of the increasingly sophisticated and damaging inventions of hackers. Individuals and organizations of all sizes are finding that their data has been locked down or encrypted until a ransom is paid. One program, CryptoLocker, infected more than 300,000 computers before the FBI and international law enforcement agencies disabled it. A few days later, Cryptowall showed up to take its place. Companies paid $1.3 billion last year in insurance to help offset the costs of combatting data attacks like these. Other examples include highly customized malware, advanced persistent threats and large-scale Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks. Security professionals must remain ever vigilant to both known and new threats on the rise. However, with proper visibility into the extended network and robust intelligence, an attack can often be detected and stopped before it causes significant damage. By using the network to gain intelligence, cyber defenders can gain greater visibility of adversary actions and quickly shut them down.

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Categories: Java, Media

Toward a More Confident Cloud Security Strategy

Java Developer's Journal - Fri, 07/25/2014 - 13:00
The cloud has hit the mainstream. Businesses in the United States currently spend more than $13 billion on cloud computing and managed hosting services, and Gartner projects that by 2015, end-user spending on cloud services could be more than $180 billion worldwide. It is estimated that 50 percent of organizations will require employees to use their own devices by 2017, which will depend on shared cloud storage. All of this requires encryption. Organizational deployment of encryption has increased significantly in recent years. Its use spans everything from encrypting data in databases and file systems, in storage networks, on back-up tapes, and while being transferred over a public and internal networks. Although this might seem that we are moving in the right direction when it comes to enterprise data protection, there’s a real risk of creating fragmentation and inconsistency – referred to as encryption sprawl – as different organizations deploy diverse technologies in different places to secure different types of data. Adding fuel to the fire, the cloud poses its own unique threats and challenges. With an undeniable value proposition, it seems clear that the cloud is inevitable and that protecting data within it will be a top priority.

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Categories: Java, Media

Mobile Apps, Code Halos, the Sharing Economy and Trustonomics

Java Developer's Journal - Fri, 07/25/2014 - 13:00
I love receiving gifts in the form of new insights! It doesn't matter if others received the same gift years ago and I am just getting it now. If it is new to me, I get excited. It is like waking up in the morning and discovering a new room in your house. I read an article by Thomas Friedman in the New York Times this weekend titled, "And Now for a Bit of Good News." The subject of the article was the new "sharing economy," think Uber, Lyft, Airbnb, etc. In the article, Friedman calls Airbnb a "Trust Platform." To me, this weekend, this term was a gift. He is so right. I have used Airbnb many times when traveling with my family, and to date have been very pleased with our experiences. Often the transactions are sizeable as I am reserving a home in a desirable location for a week. I am engaging in a transaction of some size with a person I don't know, in a home I have never visited, most often in a foreign country using different currency, involving different laws and customs. Why did I risk it? I trusted the platform.

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Categories: Java, Media